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Some Of Our Recent Training Programs From Saunders Mc Dermott Consulting

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Some recent examples of Saunders-McDermott Consulting training programs undertaken on behalf of local government and government clients

Some recent examples of Saunders-McDermott Consulting training programs undertaken on behalf of local government and government clients

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  • 1. OUR RECENT TRAINING WORKSHOPS
  • 2. MML Stakeholder Engagement & Communications Strategy
  • 3. Key Objectives • To engage stakeholders to: - build support for the Project - build credibility for the two Councils - generate confidence among the general community in the Project • To ensure relevant information is provided to the community - in a timely, accurate, constructive manner so they can make informed and logical decisions • To ensure Local, State and Federal Government support - for the Project • To ensure appropriate processes are in place - to effectively manage and streamline stakeholder engagement activities within Project Team
  • 4. Supporting Objectives • To reassure the community their issues are being taken into account - and resolved where possible and practicable • To ensure use of consistent messages - by all members of the Project Team • To achieve a balance between the broader benefits of the MML Project for the whole Central Coast community - and the concerns and issues of affected Valley residents • To position the MML Project in the wider context of WaterPlan 2050 - and the general water issues on the Central Coast • To help keep the Project on time and to budget - by achieving effective stakeholder engagement and communications
  • 5. Supporting Objectives (cont) • To manage expectations of all stakeholders - involved in the Project • To ensure honesty and integrity in what is said/ provided - to the community and all other stakeholders • To ensure appropriate processes are in place - to enable stakeholder engagement activities to be effectively documented, understood, followed through by Project Team • To reduce multiple handling of stakeholder engagement activities - to ensure timely and consistent outcomes • To measure and evaluate the success of this strategy - by tracking stakeholder attitudes and behaviour over time • To ensure this strategy is adaptive - to meet ongoing needs and changes as the Project progresses
  • 6. Top Line Key Messages • Pipeline route corridor decided for 8 of 9 Sectors - physical location of pipeline may vary to allow for on-ground features that may need to be avoided • Project Team continuing to work with all affected landholders - to resolve outstanding issues wherever possible and practicable. • Need to achieve a balance between landholder, community, environmental, constructability, cost impacts - important to get this balance right • MML key element of WaterPlan 2050 - the long-term strategy for Central Coast’s water supply system adopted in August 2007 after extensive consultation to help drought proof the region for next 45 years • Total dam storage levels for Central Coast are only at about 29% - pipeline still very much needed despite recent rains • Delivering MML is a complex task - must be done right to ensure maximum benefits and minimal impacts for all concerned
  • 7. Optimising Our Consultation Performance
  • 8. It’s Not Just What You Say • When you begin your community consultation, you can make or break your credibility - and that of the Project Team & two Councils in less than 30 seconds Role of Non-Verbal Communications • Audiences judge/interpret messages using different criteria*: - 7% based on the words - 55% non-verbal communication - 38% speaker’s vocal quality (pitch, volume and variation * UCLA Study - Professor Albert Mehrabian
  • 9. Body Language/Tone & Pitch of Your Voice • Be animated and enthusiastic - sit/stand without being tense • Look forward and show vitality - but don’t be calculated about it • Your hands control pitch, tone and speed of your voice - feel free to use them as normal in a way that you’re comfortable with • Gestures underline your key words - and can illustrate pauses in your delivery but use them minimally to add emphasis
  • 10. Using Non-Verbal Communications to Your Advantage • Dress expectations vary depending on who you are - people expect you to conform to stereotypes associated with your role, if you surprise them you add a new dimension for them to judge • Show you are interested in talking through eye contact, smiles, gestures - within 10 seconds it’s either going to be working for or against you • Always adopt a positive outlook - remember to be friendly, calm, collected at all times • Be firm, objective, credible - don’t be intimidated by stakeholders, try to build rapport and empathy where appropriate • Don’t lose your temper or get agitated - no matter how much may be baited
  • 11. Your Role in the Consultation Process • YOU are the message - you personify the two Councils, Project Team and project as a whole • Believability = honesty = trustworthy • Help protect/build the reputation - of the two Council’s and project as a whole • Help build community’s trust - in two Councils and Project Team • Effectively implement the MML Stakeholder Engagement Strategy - read it, understand it, fulfill your specific tasks/objectives
  • 12. Your Role in the Consultation Process • Know what you want to say, how to say it - use simple language, clear key messages • Convey your passion - know your stuff, deliver consistent key messages • Project your personality and voice - be likeable and persuasive • Be very practiced - be yourself, present the agreed key messages not your own views • ‘Sell’ your message - remember YOU are the message
  • 13. Effectively Dealing With Questions • Every stakeholder question is an opportunity - to deliver a key message • Use ‘stand-alone’ statements - supported by background facts and figures • Tight ‘single-thought’ responses are best - so people can understand and remember what you said, keep it simple ? and consistent • Never respond to hearsay or rumour - stick to the facts and agreed key messages • There’s no such thing as ‘off the record’ - everything you say is perceived as Council policy
  • 14. What’s at Risk if We Get it Wrong? • • • • Councils’ long-term reputation and credibility Blow out in Project timeframes and budgets Continuing fractious relationships with impacted landowners Loss of general Yarramalong Valley support X • Loss of general Central Coast community support • Negative/critical media coverage • Concerns/criticism/lack of support among elected Councillors, local MPs What Are the Benefits of Getting it Right? • • • Increased likelihood of meeting project timeframes and budgets Smoother approvals process Easier easement acquisition √ • Less challenging construction phase (from a community interaction perspective) • Support from general Central Coast community, impacted landowners (even if it’s grudging acceptance at best) • Support among elected Councillors, local MPs, media, other stakeholders
  • 15. Some Tools For Improving Your Performance
  • 16. Key Message Delivery: • Keep it simple - don’t try to deliver too many at one time • Use supporting documents - to help provide additional facts/figures • Deliver them in an appropriate manner - learn to style-flex to suit your audience • Avoid technical jargon or ‘Council’ speak - can lead to confusion and/or misinformation • Ensure you only use the agreed key messages - same words and phrases every time, reiteration is not repetition
  • 17. When & How to Share Information • Draft documents are NOT for public consumption - only when they’re approved by PCG and/or Councils should they be shared • Some documents will always be ‘commercial in confidence’ (therefore NOT for public consumption) - this classification will be decided by PCG, Project Director and/or Councils • Final documents must be publicly shared on an equitable basis - not given to just some stakeholders • Project Director/PCG will decide when documents are to be shared - not stakeholders who’ve requested them within a certain timeframe • Information provided by stakeholders must NOT be shared with other people (outside of the Project Team) - breaches their privacy, undermines their trust in Project Team
  • 18. What to Say When You Don’t Know If you should know: • Apologise for not having the required detail to hand (take question on notice) • Formally record request in an appropriate manner • Work with stakeholder engagement team to co-ordinate a response • Do not agree to a requested timeframe for a response (it may take longer to find the required information) If you shouldn’t know/are not authorised to comment: • Never bluff, guess or speculate • Explain you’re not an expert in a particular area/specific process • Formally record the request in an appropriate manner, • Work with stakeholder engagement team to co-ordinate a response
  • 19. Building Rapport & Empathy • Consultation is not just about listening - it’s about gathering, sharing and responding to information (creating a two-way process) • If you’re too empathetic - you risk creating expectations the Project Team/ Councils may not be able to fulfill • If you create too much rapport - you may put yourself in a difficult position when decisions are made which stakeholders may not agree with • The key is to create a win:win situation by: - Taking on board, listening to, acknowledging information stakeholders want to share - Providing stakeholders with the information they need to make an informed decision about how they will behave/think/respond
  • 20. How to Deal Equitably with All Stakeholders • Do not favour one stakeholder over another - you may visit or talk to some stakeholders more often but you must treat them all with the same degree of respect, integrity and courtesy • Do not provide information to some stakeholders and not others - everyone should have the chance to access/view the same information, it’s up to them if they read it or not • By providing some stakeholders with information and not others - you risk giving people more perceived power, a louder voice than others • If you’re seen as being unduly influenced by one stakeholder over another - you risk undermining the credibility/integrity of the Project Team and two Councils
  • 21. Issues Management • Efficient recording and sharing of information is vital - data cannot be accessed if it’s only in your head, make sure its recorded in TRIM and Consultation Manager, adhere to the protocols/processes for dealing with issues • If you’re concerned about something tell someone - don’t wait until it becomes an issue, the sooner it’s highlighted, the quicker it can be dealt with especially if it can have a significant impact on the Project • Provide as much detail as possible - we rely on people in the field to provide an accurate record of the behaviour, attitude, response of stakeholders and if these are changing/progressing/deteriorating • We’re currently developing an MML Issues Management Kit - will include record of contact sheet for use in the field and constantly updated Key Messages, Q&As etc
  • 22. Political Challenges • Council elections - tend to bring out ‘electioneering’ antics • Stakeholders lobbying local MPs/Councillors - can generate third party queries • Ongoing issues between Councils and NSW State Government - increases risk of Project getting caught in cross fire (Tillegra Dam, Central Coast Water Authority) • Provision of Federal Government Funding for the Project - means MML remains firmly on the national political radar • Required approval/ongoing liaison with Government agencies – means MML remains firmly on the State political radar
  • 23. Protocols & Processes Correspondence, Media, Government, Land Access
  • 24. Role of Stakeholder Engagement Team • We can provide expert stakeholder engagement and communications advice/ help - to make your lives easier • Because we write for a living - we can Plain English your technical, legal, statutory documents and position information in the most positive, effective manner to achieve the desired stakeholder engagement outcomes • We understand what makes people tick - we are experienced in helping change people’s attitudes and behaviour, we will work with you to produce effective responses (verbal and written) to stakeholder enquiries/to engage stakeholders • We can anticipate likely stakeholder questions - and help develop the right key messages to achieve our agreed stakeholder engagement and communications objectives
  • 25. Role of Stakeholder Engagement Team (cont) • We’re the guardians of ensuring all project documents are consistent - from a design and content consistency perspective • Because we’re former journalists - we can effectively manage and leverage the media • We have more than 5 years experience in water issues on the Central Coast - so have good insights into the broader ‘water picture’ • We have specific State/Federal Government relations experience - so can provide expert guidance during the approvals and liaison process • Because we’ve worked for the two Councils for more than 5 years - we understand their unique processes and protocols, we also know the latest Council policies and decisions
  • 26. Wyong Shire Council Half Day Media Training Slides
  • 27. Managing The Media Media Skills Coaching Workshop
  • 28. So What Do You Know Already? • How did the media get in touch with you? • What was the objective of the interviews you’ve done to date? • What did you tell the media during these interviews? • How did you prepare for these interviews? • Who did you go to for help before these interviews? • Did you meet the media’s deadlines for these interviews? • How did these media interviews go?
  • 29. Lets Start With the Basics
  • 30. Did You Know? When you begin your media interview, you can make or break your credibility and that of WSC in less than 30 seconds
  • 31. Did You Know? It’s not just what you say… but how you say it.
  • 32. Did You Know? • Audiences judge/interpret messages using different criteria: - 7% based on the words - 55% non-verbal communication - 38% speaker’s vocal quality (pitch, volume and variation UCLA Study – Professor Albert Mehrabian
  • 33. Your First Port of Call
  • 34. WSC Communications Team • Central point of contact for the media • Can help you prepare • Understand how the media operates • Have many years of experience • Know the individual journalists • Can anticipate the likely questions • Can develop the right key messages • Know the political environment • Know the latest council policies and decisions
  • 35. What You Need to Do
  • 36. Think Before You Speak • Read the newspapers/listen to local radio - to know what WSC is saying to gain some context for your interview • Don’t just talk to the media because they ask you - think about whether you’re the right person to comment • Don’t commit to doing an interview – until you’ve spoken to the Communications Team • Make sure you’re as fully informed as possible - on the topic you’re being interviewed about
  • 37. Think Before You Speak • Remember you’re representing WSC - in everything you say and do • Be believable - if you want people to perceive you as honest and trustworthy • Convey your passion - about the subject you’re commenting on • Know your stuff - by ensuring you’re fully informed and have read/understood all of the available background data
  • 38. What You Need to Do
  • 39. Know What You’re Going to Say • Deliver consistent messages - or risk being misunderstood/misquoted • Meet the media’s deadlines - failing to turn up/ring the media back is fatal • Present WSC’s views - not your own • Aim is to build WSC’s reputation/credibility - as well as increase the community’s trust in WSC as a professional, committed local government organisation And remember during the interview you personify WSC
  • 40. Know What You’re Going To Say • Use simple language - in particular clear key messages, examples that will resonate with the community • Project your personality - as well as your voice and passion for what you are talking about • Be likeable - as well as persuasive and professional at all times • ‘Sell’ your message - you must do this for both proactive and reactive stories
  • 41. And Remember… The consequences of what you say – a ripple of controversy started by you could end up being a tidal wave for WSC
  • 42. The Rules of Engagement: What to Say & How to Say It
  • 43. How Will You Know You’re Prepared? • Be clear what you’re being interviewed about - and why , make sure you’re the right person for he job • Read all supporting media releases - as well as FAQs, Council meeting minutes etc • Spend time preparing - with the WSC Communications Team and on your own • If you’re unsure - ask those burning Qs of the WSC Communications Team • If you’re still uncomfortable - tell the WSC Communications Team why as early as possible
  • 44. What Key Messages Should You Use? • Work with the WSC Communications Team - to identify the right key messages • These may have already been prepared - and included in a supporting media release • If not talk to the team and work together to agree what you should say - and understand why • Review what questions you may be asked - and test whether your key messages answer these questions
  • 45. Key Message Development Exercise
  • 46. What’s Your Interview Strategy? • You need an interview strategy: a credible methodology for effectively responding to difficult questions and communicating your key messages
  • 47. What’s Your Interview Strategy? The media is looking for a good story Make It a win- win encounter: CONFLICT! a good story that benefits you You want to get your message across
  • 48. What’s Your Interview Strategy? Pursue your Don’t just Be prepared ‘survive’ the own agenda interview Talk in Don’t be Never repeat audience intimidated by negatives benefit terms interviewer
  • 49. Dealing with Difficult Media Questions
  • 50. How Should You Handle Questions? • See every question as an opportunity - to deliver WSC’s key messages • View each question as an invitation - not a threat • Broaden the questions out - most media tend to ask very specific questions • Acknowledge the question - to help establish your credibility, reduce the risk of you appearing to be hiding something, the community’s trust in WSC being eroded
  • 51. Handling Difficult Questions Exercise
  • 52. Tools to Help You Perform Well as a Media Spokesperson
  • 53. How Do You Get Back on Track? • Use specific techniques to get back on track - when you get put under pressure, asked questions you’re not able to answer • These are simple expressions to enable you to change tack - and get back to where you want to be • They allow you to take control - of the interview and the questions you’re being asked
  • 54. So What Are Transition Statements? ‘But the key point here is…’ ‘yet on the other hand…’
  • 55. So What Are Transition Statements? ‘let me just remind you…’ ‘but let’s just look at the facts…’
  • 56. So What Are Transition Statements? ‘the real issue however is the question of…’ ‘on the contrary, I would say…’
  • 57. So What Are Transition Statements? ‘despite your comments, the facts remain…’ ‘in reply, I would point out…’
  • 58. How Do You Get Your Point Across? • You need to keep reiterating - your key messages • Don’t assume by stating your key messages once - they’ll be printed or broadcast • Reiteration is not repetition - it’s about making your point in a variety of different ways • It’s up to you to sell your message - the media have their own agenda • And remember don’t try and deliver more than 3 key messages – during an interview
  • 59. How Do You Avoid Red Herrings? • Never fall for ‘Red Herring’ questions - these are anything that’s not relevant to the interview • Side-step them - and ‘transition’ the interview back to your key messages/your agenda • Keep the interview ‘on track’ - by remaining focused and concentrating on your interview strategy
  • 60. Why Use Stand-Alone Statements? • You need to speak in ‘stand-alone’ statements - don’t just give responses to questions! • Your statements must ‘stand’ on their own - so they’re easier for the media to edit/use • A 30-second reply is often too long - that’s why tight ‘single-thought’ responses are best • Aim for the quick ‘7 second grab - every time
  • 61. And Remember… • Never repeat negatives • Never respond to hearsay or rumour • Avoid industry/technical jargon • When you don’t know and shouldn’t know – say so, don’t bluff • When you don’t know and should know - commit to getting the information to them as a follow-up action • Remember there is no such thing as ‘off the record’ - if you say it, they’ll run it
  • 62. So How Does it All Work Together? Question/Invitation Acknowledge/Answe r CREDIBLE LINK Topic Transition Message Reiteration
  • 63. How You Know if You’ve Done Well? Remember: a successful interview is when you have said what you wanted to say – many times over!
  • 64. Dealing with Different Types of Media
  • 65. Different Media Types - Radio • Face-to-face or down-the-line • Enunciate/diction - be understood • Use bullet-pointed key messages - no more than 3 per interview • Keep your answers succinct - tight thought responses, stand alone statements • Avoid making aural distractions • Most interviews will be minutes in length • Radio interviews are all about informative, newsy ‘grabs’
  • 66. Different Media Types- Newspapers  Face-to-face or down-the-line  Use bullet-pointed key messages - no more than 3 per interview  Think about your quotes - what will they ‘look like in print’  Plan for the headline you want - avoid the headline you don’t want  Remember print interviews can be much longer - and more tricky
  • 67. Different Media Types- Newspapers  Print media means there’s a permanent record of what you said - for everyone to see  Use other tools to help put your input in context - such as media releases, background briefing by WSC Communication Team  If you can’t answer their questions or don’t have the information to hand – get the WSC Communications Team to follow up after the interview  Talk to the WSC Communications Team about photos - if you think it would help put the story in context
  • 68. Summary
  • 69. Presentation Skills Workshop Your Trainer Today: Janet Saunders
  • 70. What today is all about…. To change how you feel about presenting To dissolve those fears you may have about interacting with your audience To provide you with a strategy to achieve a win-win situation
  • 71. Lets Start With How You Influence People
  • 72. So lets get started…. When you begin your presentation, you can make or break your credibility and that of the Project / RTA in less than 30 seconds
  • 73. The reason for this is….. It’s not just what you say, but how you say it…..
  • 74. How your audience will respond…. • Audiences judge/interpret messages using different criteria:* - 7% based on the words - 55% non-verbal communication - 38% speaker’s vocal quality (pitch, volume and variation * UCLA Study – Professor Albert Mehrabian
  • 75. How your audience processes information... • Audiences receive / process information in different ways: - some prefer ‘visual’ – such as pictures and diagrams - some prefer ‘words’ – such as letters, websites, newspaper articles - some prefer ‘verbal’ – such as presentations at meetings, during 1-on-1 briefings - some prefer a mixture of all three • It all depends on their ‘personality profile’
  • 76. So how do you shape up?....(1) Do you: • Look like fish out of water • Are robotic, corporate and scripted • Fail to ‘connect’ with the audience • Move in a stiff, wooden manner • Present intellectually, not emotionally • Lack passion and humanity Then maybe you are a mediocre speaker!
  • 77. So how do you shape up?....(2) Do you: • Know the content, inside out • Earnestly acknowledge questions • Use your key messages to answer questions • Use simple words and memorable phrases • Tell interesting and relevant anecdotes • Speak naturally and passionately Then maybe you are a good speaker, or….
  • 78. So how do you shape up?....(3) Do you do all of those things naturally as well as: • Convey your passion • Know your stuff Are you: • Very practiced • Act yourself If so then you are truly a great speaker!
  • 79. How to share information – your role! (1) • During your presentation you personify the Project / RTA • It’s also vital that you are believable - which will translate into honesty and trustworthiness • You must also be yourself – be an original • Know what you want to say – and how to say it, use simple language • Project your personality – and voice • Be likeable - and persuasive, ‘sell’ your message Remember YOU are the message
  • 80. How to share information – your role! (2) It’s vital: • You deliver consistent messages • Provide information that resonates with the audience - or they’ll fill the information vacuum themselves • Present the RTA’s views - not your own • You’re focused on building the Project / RTA’s reputation, as well as • Building the audience’s trust in the Project / RTA
  • 81. Simulated Presentation 1
  • 82. Preparation Is The Key
  • 83. Understand why you’re presenting….. Work with your Community Liaison Advisers to understand: • What’s the objective of the presentation? • What are the current attitudes / likely reaction of the audience? • How do you want to change these and why? • Is the first time you have presented to this audience? • If not, what has changed since you last presented to this audience?
  • 84. Know what you want to say…. Work with your Community Liaison Advisers to: • Select your key messages - choose 3 as a maximum • Ensure they are clear and easy to understand – ensure they will resonate with the audience • Anticipate the ‘worst’ possible questions - the audience are likely to ask • Ensure your key messages are able to answer these questions - effectively, honestly and succinctly
  • 85. Key Message Development Anticipating Questions
  • 86. The Rules of Engagement: What to Say & How to Say It
  • 87. Knowing if you’re ready….. • You’ve agreed to give the presentation • You know your key messages • You understand the audience • You’ve anticipated the likely questions • You’ve worked out your answers • You’ve rehearsed your key messages • You’re dressed for the part • You’re ready!
  • 88. Your presentation strategy…. • You need a credible methodology for effectively responding to difficult questions and communicating your key messages
  • 89. Overcoming a fundamental conflict…. The audience wants to hear the key messages they desire Your role is to deliver a ‘win- CONFLICT! win’ encounter for everyone You want to get across the Project / RTA’s agreed key messages
  • 90. Ensuring you take control…. Pursue your Don’t just Be prepared ‘survive’ the own agenda presentation Talk in Don’t be Never repeat audience intimidated by negatives benefit terms the audience
  • 91. Dealing with questions….(1) • Every question is an opportunity - to deliver the Project / RTA’s key messages • View each question as an invitation - not a threat • Most ‘difficult’ stakeholder questions are quite specific – try to broaden the content of your response if you can’t provide a detailed answer
  • 92. Dealing with questions….(2) • To be credible - you must acknowledge the question first • Otherwise you will come across as avoiding the question • People who avoid questions look as if they’re hiding something • This risks eroding the community’s trust in the Project / RTA
  • 93. Transitioning out of difficulties….(1) • You need a technique to get you back on your track – back to your agenda • The best way is to use simple expressions that enable you to change tack – to get you back to where you want to be • This type of transitioning allows you to take directional control – of your presentation and Q&A session
  • 94. Transitioning out of difficulties….(2) ‘But the key point here is…’ ‘yet on the other hand…’
  • 95. Transitioning out of difficulties….(3) ‘let me just remind you…’ ‘but let’s just look at the facts…’
  • 96. Transitioning out of difficulties….(4) ‘the real issue however is the question of…’ ‘on the contrary, I would say…’
  • 97. Transitioning out of difficulties….(5) ‘despite your comments, the facts remain…’ ‘in reply, I would point out…’
  • 98. Why you need to reiterate.... • Reiteration is not repetition • Reiteration is making your point - in a variety of different ways • Don’t assume by stating your key messages once they’ll be heard – or understood • Remember, reiteration is not repetition
  • 99. Making your presentation work….(1) Question/Invitation Acknowledge/Answer CREDIBLE LINK Topic Transition Message Reiteration
  • 100. Making your presentation work…(2) A successful presentation is when you’ve said what you wanted to say – many times over!
  • 101. Why you must avoid ‘Red Herrings’…. • Ensure you never fall for ‘Red Herring’ questions • These are anything that’s not relevant to your presentation - or the Project • You can side-step these and ‘transition’ your presentation / Q&A session - back to your key messages • This will ensure your presentation / Q&A session remains ‘on track’
  • 102. Importance of ‘Stand-Alone’ statements’…. • Try to speak in ‘stand-alone’ statements • Be careful not to waffle - when responding to questions • Where possible provide ‘statements’ that can be easily remember • Remember a 30-second reply is often too long • Focus on responding with tight ‘single-thought’ answer and phrases
  • 103. How to deal with negatives…. • Never repeat negatives • Never respond to hearsay or rumour • Avoid industry/technical jargon • When you don’t know, say so - don’t try to bluff • Remember there’s no such thing as ‘off the record’
  • 104. The Rules of Engagement: How to Project
  • 105. Effective impression management….(1) • First impressions are always right • Dress expectations vary - depending on who you are and what your perceived role is • People expect you to conform to the stereotypes - associated with your role and title • If you surprise an audience – you’ll be adding a new dimension for them to judge you by
  • 106. Effective impression management….(2) • Non-verbal communication is critical • By achieving effective impression management - you’ll give yourself an advantage • That’s why you must show you are interested in talking to people - through you eye contact, smiles and gestures • Within 10 seconds – you’ll know if it’s going to work for or against you
  • 107. Leveraging your body language….(1) • Be animated and enthusiastic – which means standing or sitting without being tense • Look forward, show vitality - but don’t be calculated about it • Your hands control pitch and tone – as well as the speed of your voice • Gestures underline your key words – they can also help illustrate pauses in your delivery • But use them minimally - to add emphasis • If you need to, practice in front of the mirror!
  • 108. Leveraging your body language….(2) • Shaky nerves can be a problem • Some people fear speaking more than dying! • Nerves can be controlled with practice – and a positive mindset • Preparation can overcome a lack of confidence • Be confident – maintain good eye contact, have a strong voice with resounding tones • Be sincere - smile, have your palms open and facing upwards • Show enthusiasm and interest – through your tone of voice, by leaning your head forward, by the way you stand
  • 109. Dealing with the unexpected…. • Challenges you may face include: - technology not working - difficult stakeholders such as the media turn-up - audience is more hostile than expected - audience is much smaller an anticipated • Important to remain calm no matter what happens • Demonstrate your leadership skills - and take charge of the situation • Remember to keep your audience fully informed – as to what is happening • Never let things get out of control
  • 110. Ensuring you have a positive attitude….(1) • Always adopt a positive outlook • Be friendly – as well as calm and collected • Be firm and forceful – as well as objective and credible • Don’t be intimidated by the audience – or the environment /atmosphere • Never lose your temper - or get agitated • Never say ‘I can’t comment/answer that’
  • 111. Ensuring you have a positive attitude….(2) • It’s okay to feel empathy - but not to the point of appearing weak or under pressure • Demonstrating leadership is not aggressive – it’s assertive • Don’t be afraid to remind people that personal attacks on you – are not acceptable • Always be courteous – but not to the point where people are able to bully or intimidate you
  • 112. Working with your colleagues…. • If you have to work as a ‘tag team’- ensure you have an effective partnership plan • Agree your specific roles – prior to commencing your presentation • Agree beforehand - who’s going to answer which questions • Ensure you have a Plan B - for handling the unexpected
  • 113. All That’s Left is One Final Check
  • 114. If you’re ready, you will…. • Know your presentation • Remember not to bluff • Know your facts • Ensure you take control • Be focused on the agreed • Ensure you don’t miss opportunities objectives to reiterate your key messages • Understand the audience • Challenge untruths • Have identified your key • Avoid buzzwords messages • Be concise • Remember that If you don’t • Be yourself know – say so • Avoid personal opinion • Have anticipated the questions • Avoid emotional responses • Rehearsed your presentation • Handle the unexpected, AND • Look the part • Assume you’re the star, because you • Be ready to turn negatives into ARE! positives
  • 115. Your Questions Answered
  • 116. Simulated Presentations 2&3