Your SlideShare is downloading. ×
160 09 Oct19
Upcoming SlideShare
Loading in...5
×

Thanks for flagging this SlideShare!

Oops! An error has occurred.

×

Introducing the official SlideShare app

Stunning, full-screen experience for iPhone and Android

Text the download link to your phone

Standard text messaging rates apply

160 09 Oct19

336
views

Published on

Published in: Education

0 Comments
0 Likes
Statistics
Notes
  • Be the first to comment

  • Be the first to like this

No Downloads
Views
Total Views
336
On Slideshare
0
From Embeds
0
Number of Embeds
0
Actions
Shares
0
Downloads
3
Comments
0
Likes
0
Embeds 0
No embeds

Report content
Flagged as inappropriate Flag as inappropriate
Flag as inappropriate

Select your reason for flagging this presentation as inappropriate.

Cancel
No notes for slide

Transcript

  • 1. Hamlet October 19, 2009
  • 2. Today
    • Drama Introduction
    • Hamlet: Act 1
    • Essay Tips
  • 3. Elements of Drama
    • Plot
    • Story
    • Dialogue
    • Represented Action
    • Audience Expectations
    • Structural Divisions
  • 4. Characterization
    • Stock characters
    • Flat and round characters
  • 5. Character
  • 6. Character
    • Round
      • Well-developed
      • Closely involved in/responsive to action
    • Flat
      • Barely developed
      • Stereotypical
  • 7. Character
    • Foil
      • Supporting character who contrasts major character
    • Stock
    • Dynamic
      • Grow and change
    • Static
      • Remain unchanged
  • 8. Drama: Setting
    • Setting
    • Dialogue
    • Sets
    • Audience’s knowledge
    • Sets as symbolic
  • 9. Drama: Theme
    • Repetitions
    • Symbolism
    • Contrast
  • 10. Drama: Irony
    • Presence of an audience
    • Dramatic irony
    • Cassio did top her. Ask thy husband [Iago] else.
    • O, I were damned beneath all depth in hell
    • But that I did proceed upon just grounds
    • To this extremity. Thy husband knew it all.
  • 11. Hamlet Questions
    • Why does Hamlet delay avenging his father’s death?
    • Is Gertrude guilty?
    • Who is the ghost? Is it real?
    • Is vengeance moral?
    • Is Hamlet really mad?
    • Is Ophelia’s death really suicide?
    • What does Hamlet mean to say at the end of the play?
  • 12. Hamlet Publication History
    • Written in 1600 (?)
    • Based on twelfth-century Danish History
    • Screen history
  • 13. Hamlet Criticism
    • Nineteenth Century: soul of a poet
    • Twentieth Century: Oedipus complex
    • Political: hiding the fix to corruption
    • Feminist: Gertrude and Ophelia
  • 14. Hamlet’s Soliloquies
    • Formal rhetoric
    • Academic debate
    • Mimic the mind at work
    • Revealing “moral complexity, psychological depth, philosophical power”—never done before
    • Subjectivity
    • Innovation
  • 15. Act 1, Scene 2 Soliloquy
    • http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=-q0qmjEWEPU
    • http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=OCBVmiVkzTM
  • 16. Act 1: Hamlet
    • 1.1: Barnardo, Francisco, Horatio, Ghost
    • 1.2: Claudius, Valtemand, Laertes, Polonius, Gertrude, Hamlet
    • 1.3: Laertes, Ophelia, Polonius
    • 1.4: Hamlet, Horatio, Marcellus
    • 1.5 Hamlet, Ghost, Horatio, Marcellus
  • 17. Essay Tips From Short Story Papers
    • Quote Integration
    • Present literary tense
    • Introduction/Conclusion
    • Topic Sentences
  • 18. Present Literary Tense
    • Always always always use present tense in literary essays when discussing the literature.
  • 19. Present Literary Tense
    • When the mother dies, the speaker responds by discussing the financial decisions.
    • Although the family lives in Ontario, the morals learned can apply to other provinces as well.
    • Sample: 1444
  • 20. Essay Tips From Short Story Papers
    • Quote Integration
    • Present literary tense
    • Introduction/Conclusion
    • Topic Sentences
  • 21. Introduction
    • Start with a grabbing first sentence
    • Don’t be general—dive directly into the text
    • Don’t try to apply this paper to the rest of the world
  • 22. Attention-Grabber
    • Significance of your subject
    • Well-phrased quotation
    • Startling statement
    • Ask a question
    • Begin with a generalization (be careful!)
    • Challenge a common opinion
    • Begin with a definition
    • Describe an interesting incident/anecdote
  • 23. Conclusion/Topic Sentences
    • Still stay on point with the text
  • 24. Example
  • 25. Two Biggest Tips
    • Write your own paper.
    • Look at your comments from the last paper.
  • 26. Works Cited
    • Norton Shakespeare , ed. Cohen, Howard, Maus.