160 09 Oct19
Upcoming SlideShare
Loading in...5
×
 

160 09 Oct19

on

  • 583 views

 

Statistics

Views

Total Views
583
Views on SlideShare
583
Embed Views
0

Actions

Likes
0
Downloads
3
Comments
0

0 Embeds 0

No embeds

Accessibility

Categories

Upload Details

Uploaded via as Microsoft PowerPoint

Usage Rights

© All Rights Reserved

Report content

Flagged as inappropriate Flag as inappropriate
Flag as inappropriate

Select your reason for flagging this presentation as inappropriate.

Cancel
  • Full Name Full Name Comment goes here.
    Are you sure you want to
    Your message goes here
    Processing…
Post Comment
Edit your comment

    160 09 Oct19 160 09 Oct19 Presentation Transcript

    • Hamlet October 19, 2009
    • Today
      • Drama Introduction
      • Hamlet: Act 1
      • Essay Tips
    • Elements of Drama
      • Plot
      • Story
      • Dialogue
      • Represented Action
      • Audience Expectations
      • Structural Divisions
    • Characterization
      • Stock characters
      • Flat and round characters
    • Character
    • Character
      • Round
        • Well-developed
        • Closely involved in/responsive to action
      • Flat
        • Barely developed
        • Stereotypical
    • Character
      • Foil
        • Supporting character who contrasts major character
      • Stock
      • Dynamic
        • Grow and change
      • Static
        • Remain unchanged
    • Drama: Setting
      • Setting
      • Dialogue
      • Sets
      • Audience’s knowledge
      • Sets as symbolic
    • Drama: Theme
      • Repetitions
      • Symbolism
      • Contrast
    • Drama: Irony
      • Presence of an audience
      • Dramatic irony
      • Cassio did top her. Ask thy husband [Iago] else.
      • O, I were damned beneath all depth in hell
      • But that I did proceed upon just grounds
      • To this extremity. Thy husband knew it all.
    • Hamlet Questions
      • Why does Hamlet delay avenging his father’s death?
      • Is Gertrude guilty?
      • Who is the ghost? Is it real?
      • Is vengeance moral?
      • Is Hamlet really mad?
      • Is Ophelia’s death really suicide?
      • What does Hamlet mean to say at the end of the play?
    • Hamlet Publication History
      • Written in 1600 (?)
      • Based on twelfth-century Danish History
      • Screen history
    • Hamlet Criticism
      • Nineteenth Century: soul of a poet
      • Twentieth Century: Oedipus complex
      • Political: hiding the fix to corruption
      • Feminist: Gertrude and Ophelia
    • Hamlet’s Soliloquies
      • Formal rhetoric
      • Academic debate
      • Mimic the mind at work
      • Revealing “moral complexity, psychological depth, philosophical power”—never done before
      • Subjectivity
      • Innovation
    • Act 1, Scene 2 Soliloquy
      • http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=-q0qmjEWEPU
      • http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=OCBVmiVkzTM
    • Act 1: Hamlet
      • 1.1: Barnardo, Francisco, Horatio, Ghost
      • 1.2: Claudius, Valtemand, Laertes, Polonius, Gertrude, Hamlet
      • 1.3: Laertes, Ophelia, Polonius
      • 1.4: Hamlet, Horatio, Marcellus
      • 1.5 Hamlet, Ghost, Horatio, Marcellus
    • Essay Tips From Short Story Papers
      • Quote Integration
      • Present literary tense
      • Introduction/Conclusion
      • Topic Sentences
    • Present Literary Tense
      • Always always always use present tense in literary essays when discussing the literature.
    • Present Literary Tense
      • When the mother dies, the speaker responds by discussing the financial decisions.
      • Although the family lives in Ontario, the morals learned can apply to other provinces as well.
      • Sample: 1444
    • Essay Tips From Short Story Papers
      • Quote Integration
      • Present literary tense
      • Introduction/Conclusion
      • Topic Sentences
    • Introduction
      • Start with a grabbing first sentence
      • Don’t be general—dive directly into the text
      • Don’t try to apply this paper to the rest of the world
    • Attention-Grabber
      • Significance of your subject
      • Well-phrased quotation
      • Startling statement
      • Ask a question
      • Begin with a generalization (be careful!)
      • Challenge a common opinion
      • Begin with a definition
      • Describe an interesting incident/anecdote
    • Conclusion/Topic Sentences
      • Still stay on point with the text
    • Example
    • Two Biggest Tips
      • Write your own paper.
      • Look at your comments from the last paper.
    • Works Cited
      • Norton Shakespeare , ed. Cohen, Howard, Maus.