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    160 09 Nov12 160 09 Nov12 Presentation Transcript

    • Part 1: How to Nail Your Essay November 12, 2009
    • Today
      • Essay Workshop: Part 1
      • Jeopardy Quotation Selection
    • 1: Read Comments from Earlier
    • 1: Read Comments from Earlier
      • Format
      • Structure
      • Content
      • Sentence-level
      • Documentation
    • 2. Talk to Your Instructor
    • 3. Start Early
      • Topic
      • Brainstorming
      • Thesis
      • Outline
      • Research
      • Draft
      • Revision
      • Final
    • 4. Brainstorming
      • Start with every example that strikes your topic
      • List them all
      • Start grouping in logical categories
    • 4. Brainstorming/Outlining Is Gertrude a good mother? Topic
      • Wants him to get out of his funk (1.2.68)
      • Unaware of Hamlet’s digs (1.2.75)
      • Wants him to stay at Elsinore (1.2.119)
      • More interested in R&G as Hamlet’s friends, not using him (2.2.19)
      • Diminishes “ov’r hasty marriage 2.2.56)
      • Wants to cut to the chase (2.2.97)
      • Want the extant reading (2.2.114)
      • Aware that he walks (2.2.161)
      • Wants the cause to be Ophelia (3.1.39)
      • Unaware of mirror in the play (3.2.210)
      • Polonius recognizes Gertrude as a buffer (3.4.1)
      • Gertrude unaware of Hamlet’s accusations (3.4.38)
      • Oblivious (3.4.50)
      • Understanding through her son (3.4.69)
      • Bothered by accusations (3.4.84; 181)
      • Looking for excuses (3.4.96; 127; 4.1.6))
      • Looks for advice (3.4.164)
      • Runs to Claudius (4.4)
      • Rats out Hamlet in favour of Claudius (4.5.124)
      • Helpful to other children: wants to listen to Ophelia to relieve her madness
      • Delivers news to Laertes that Ophelia is dead (4.7.134)
      • In the sword fight, Gertrude is on Hamlet’s side (5.2.230)
    • 4. Brainstorming/Outlining Is Gertrude a good mother? Topic
      • Wants him to get out of his funk (1.2.68)
      • Unaware of Hamlet’s digs (1.2.75)
      • Wants him to stay at Elsinore (1.2.119)
      • More interested in R&G as Hamlet’s friends, not using him (2.2.19)
      • Diminishes “ov’r hasty marriage 2.2.56)
      • Wants to cut to the chase (2.2.97)
      • Want the extant reading (2.2.114)
      • Aware that he walks (2.2.161)
      • Wants the cause to be Ophelia (3.1.39)
      • Unaware of mirror in the play (3.2.210)
      • Polonius recognizes Gertrude as a buffer (3.4.1)
      • Gertrude unaware of Hamlet’s accusations (3.4.38)
      • Oblivious (3.4.50)
      • Understanding through her son (3.4.69)
      • Bothered by accusations (3.4.84; 181)
      • Looking for excuses (3.4.96; 127; 4.1.6))
      • Looks for advice (3.4.164)
      • Runs to Claudius (4.4)
      • Rats out Hamlet in favour of Claudius (4.5.124)
      • Helpful to other children: wants to listen to Ophelia to relieve her madness
      • Delivers news to Laertes that Ophelia is dead (4.7.134)
      • In the sword fight, Gertrude is on Hamlet’s side (5.2.230)
    • 5. Outline
    • 6. Thesis
      • Concession-refutation
      • Example: Although experts say that eating burnt food can cause cancer, a child who refuses to eat a burnt marshmallow at summer camp could face more immediate consequences of social alienation.
      • Example: While Harlen may appear as a liar, he actually distinguishes between harmful lies and untruths that help people, justifying his transgressions of sincerity.
    • 6. Thesis (cont’d)
      • Has to be an argument
      • Cannot just be a restatement or summary of plot
      • Can begin as a “working thesis” that changes as you write the paper
      • Comes as the last sentence of the first paragraph (the introduction)
      • Can include a path (the main major points you will be making)
    • 6. Thesis: Example
    • 7. Paragraph Mechanics
        • Is 6-12 sentences long—easy reading.
        • Begins with a topic sentence
        • Is indented
        • Expresses ONE idea
        • Includes a transition
        • Get away from the strictly five paragraphs!
    • 7. The Perfect Paragraph Topic Sentence Point #3 Point #2 Point #1 Concluding Sentence to Summarize and Transition
    • 7. 4-F Test
        • Focus
          • Topic Sentence
        • Fine Points
          • Details
        • Flow
          • Transitions
        • Finality
          • Concluding Sentence
    • 8. Quote Integration
      • Frame all quotes with your own writing
      • Spend as much time or more explaining each quote as the quote is long
      • Change tense or pronouns from original that do not mesh with your own framing text
      • Only put a comma before the quote if it could be replaced with the word “that”
      • Commas and periods belong inside quotation marks
      • Page number comes after the quote
    • 8. Quote Integration
      • Use present tense when discussing any type of text or author.
      • Herrmann displays the statistics from her ethnographic survey she conducted in 1995.
      • She highlights a study that concludes “working women, even managers and professionals, perform 79% of the housework.”
    • 8. Tense
      • The article was about the gender differences in garage sale sellers and buyers.
      • The author discussed how female buyers differ from male buyers.
    • 8. Number
      • The article begins with a quote from Lisa McFarren who states that “I’ve known many men to have a garage sale.”
      • The author explicitly states that “my field research indicates there is indeed a division of labour.”
    • 8. Quote Integration
      • Spend as much space discussing the direct quotation as is the length of the quote.
      • Quote too long?
      • Summarise
      • Paraphrase, or
      • Use ellipses.
    • 8. Block Quotations
      • Remember: spend the same space on the quote as the discussion
      • No quotations around a block quote
      • Use a block quote if format of original is important (eg poetry and stanza breaks)
      • Use a block quote if quoting more than three lines in your own writing
    • 8. Other Direct Quotation Rules
      • Never drop a quote without discussion of it
      • Too much altering (with brackets and ellipses)? Summarize or paraphrase
      • Use “sic” to denote any errors in the original quote
    • 9. Introduction
      • Gripping first sentence
      • Background
      • Narrow thesis
      • Path
      • No low-content spots
      • No diving into details yet
      • Write this last
    • 10. Conclusion
      • Restate topic sentences (using new wording)
      • Remind the reader of how great your paper was
      • Write this second to last
    •  
    • Taking Stock