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160 09 Nov12

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  • 1. Part 1: How to Nail Your Essay November 12, 2009
  • 2. Today
    • Essay Workshop: Part 1
    • Jeopardy Quotation Selection
  • 3. 1: Read Comments from Earlier
  • 4. 1: Read Comments from Earlier
    • Format
    • Structure
    • Content
    • Sentence-level
    • Documentation
  • 5. 2. Talk to Your Instructor
  • 6. 3. Start Early
    • Topic
    • Brainstorming
    • Thesis
    • Outline
    • Research
    • Draft
    • Revision
    • Final
  • 7. 4. Brainstorming
    • Start with every example that strikes your topic
    • List them all
    • Start grouping in logical categories
  • 8. 4. Brainstorming/Outlining Is Gertrude a good mother? Topic
    • Wants him to get out of his funk (1.2.68)
    • Unaware of Hamlet’s digs (1.2.75)
    • Wants him to stay at Elsinore (1.2.119)
    • More interested in R&G as Hamlet’s friends, not using him (2.2.19)
    • Diminishes “ov’r hasty marriage 2.2.56)
    • Wants to cut to the chase (2.2.97)
    • Want the extant reading (2.2.114)
    • Aware that he walks (2.2.161)
    • Wants the cause to be Ophelia (3.1.39)
    • Unaware of mirror in the play (3.2.210)
    • Polonius recognizes Gertrude as a buffer (3.4.1)
    • Gertrude unaware of Hamlet’s accusations (3.4.38)
    • Oblivious (3.4.50)
    • Understanding through her son (3.4.69)
    • Bothered by accusations (3.4.84; 181)
    • Looking for excuses (3.4.96; 127; 4.1.6))
    • Looks for advice (3.4.164)
    • Runs to Claudius (4.4)
    • Rats out Hamlet in favour of Claudius (4.5.124)
    • Helpful to other children: wants to listen to Ophelia to relieve her madness
    • Delivers news to Laertes that Ophelia is dead (4.7.134)
    • In the sword fight, Gertrude is on Hamlet’s side (5.2.230)
  • 9. 4. Brainstorming/Outlining Is Gertrude a good mother? Topic
    • Wants him to get out of his funk (1.2.68)
    • Unaware of Hamlet’s digs (1.2.75)
    • Wants him to stay at Elsinore (1.2.119)
    • More interested in R&G as Hamlet’s friends, not using him (2.2.19)
    • Diminishes “ov’r hasty marriage 2.2.56)
    • Wants to cut to the chase (2.2.97)
    • Want the extant reading (2.2.114)
    • Aware that he walks (2.2.161)
    • Wants the cause to be Ophelia (3.1.39)
    • Unaware of mirror in the play (3.2.210)
    • Polonius recognizes Gertrude as a buffer (3.4.1)
    • Gertrude unaware of Hamlet’s accusations (3.4.38)
    • Oblivious (3.4.50)
    • Understanding through her son (3.4.69)
    • Bothered by accusations (3.4.84; 181)
    • Looking for excuses (3.4.96; 127; 4.1.6))
    • Looks for advice (3.4.164)
    • Runs to Claudius (4.4)
    • Rats out Hamlet in favour of Claudius (4.5.124)
    • Helpful to other children: wants to listen to Ophelia to relieve her madness
    • Delivers news to Laertes that Ophelia is dead (4.7.134)
    • In the sword fight, Gertrude is on Hamlet’s side (5.2.230)
  • 10. 5. Outline
  • 11. 6. Thesis
    • Concession-refutation
    • Example: Although experts say that eating burnt food can cause cancer, a child who refuses to eat a burnt marshmallow at summer camp could face more immediate consequences of social alienation.
    • Example: While Harlen may appear as a liar, he actually distinguishes between harmful lies and untruths that help people, justifying his transgressions of sincerity.
  • 12. 6. Thesis (cont’d)
    • Has to be an argument
    • Cannot just be a restatement or summary of plot
    • Can begin as a “working thesis” that changes as you write the paper
    • Comes as the last sentence of the first paragraph (the introduction)
    • Can include a path (the main major points you will be making)
  • 13. 6. Thesis: Example
  • 14. 7. Paragraph Mechanics
      • Is 6-12 sentences long—easy reading.
      • Begins with a topic sentence
      • Is indented
      • Expresses ONE idea
      • Includes a transition
      • Get away from the strictly five paragraphs!
  • 15. 7. The Perfect Paragraph Topic Sentence Point #3 Point #2 Point #1 Concluding Sentence to Summarize and Transition
  • 16. 7. 4-F Test
      • Focus
        • Topic Sentence
      • Fine Points
        • Details
      • Flow
        • Transitions
      • Finality
        • Concluding Sentence
  • 17. 8. Quote Integration
    • Frame all quotes with your own writing
    • Spend as much time or more explaining each quote as the quote is long
    • Change tense or pronouns from original that do not mesh with your own framing text
    • Only put a comma before the quote if it could be replaced with the word “that”
    • Commas and periods belong inside quotation marks
    • Page number comes after the quote
  • 18. 8. Quote Integration
    • Use present tense when discussing any type of text or author.
    • Herrmann displays the statistics from her ethnographic survey she conducted in 1995.
    • She highlights a study that concludes “working women, even managers and professionals, perform 79% of the housework.”
  • 19. 8. Tense
    • The article was about the gender differences in garage sale sellers and buyers.
    • The author discussed how female buyers differ from male buyers.
  • 20. 8. Number
    • The article begins with a quote from Lisa McFarren who states that “I’ve known many men to have a garage sale.”
    • The author explicitly states that “my field research indicates there is indeed a division of labour.”
  • 21. 8. Quote Integration
    • Spend as much space discussing the direct quotation as is the length of the quote.
    • Quote too long?
    • Summarise
    • Paraphrase, or
    • Use ellipses.
  • 22. 8. Block Quotations
    • Remember: spend the same space on the quote as the discussion
    • No quotations around a block quote
    • Use a block quote if format of original is important (eg poetry and stanza breaks)
    • Use a block quote if quoting more than three lines in your own writing
  • 23. 8. Other Direct Quotation Rules
    • Never drop a quote without discussion of it
    • Too much altering (with brackets and ellipses)? Summarize or paraphrase
    • Use “sic” to denote any errors in the original quote
  • 24. 9. Introduction
    • Gripping first sentence
    • Background
    • Narrow thesis
    • Path
    • No low-content spots
    • No diving into details yet
    • Write this last
  • 25. 10. Conclusion
    • Restate topic sentences (using new wording)
    • Remind the reader of how great your paper was
    • Write this second to last
  • 26.  
  • 27. Taking Stock