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English150  Week2 Part1 Kate
English150  Week2 Part1 Kate
English150  Week2 Part1 Kate
English150  Week2 Part1 Kate
English150  Week2 Part1 Kate
English150  Week2 Part1 Kate
English150  Week2 Part1 Kate
English150  Week2 Part1 Kate
English150  Week2 Part1 Kate
English150  Week2 Part1 Kate
English150  Week2 Part1 Kate
English150  Week2 Part1 Kate
English150  Week2 Part1 Kate
English150  Week2 Part1 Kate
English150  Week2 Part1 Kate
English150  Week2 Part1 Kate
English150  Week2 Part1 Kate
English150  Week2 Part1 Kate
English150  Week2 Part1 Kate
English150  Week2 Part1 Kate
English150  Week2 Part1 Kate
English150  Week2 Part1 Kate
English150  Week2 Part1 Kate
English150  Week2 Part1 Kate
English150  Week2 Part1 Kate
English150  Week2 Part1 Kate
English150  Week2 Part1 Kate
English150  Week2 Part1 Kate
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English150 Week2 Part1 Kate

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  • 1. Writing Effective Summaries Week 2, Part 1
  • 2. Today
    • Learn about summaries
    • Go over summary assignment (5%)
  • 3. Classes
    • Word-of-the-day
    • Grammar-rama
  • 4. Word-of-the-day
    • Furtive: secretive, covert, underhanded (usually in a bad way)
    • “ marked by quiet and caution and secrecy; taking pains to avoid being observed”
    • Examples:
      • Chelsea’s furtive manner at dinner made her husband suspicious.
      • His furtive glance at the clock did not go unnoticed.
  • 5. Grammar-Rama
    • Contractions make writing informal.
    • Examples:
    • Don’t
    • Can’t
    • Won’t
    • Isn’t
    • Hadn’t
    • Shouldn’t
    • She’s
    • I’m
  • 6. Grammar-Rama
    • Don’t use contractions in academic writing
    • Avoid if possible—easy way to make writing formal
  • 7. Summary
    • A skill within essays
    • An assignment in this class
  • 8. When do you summarize?
  • 9. Real-life Summaries
    • Note-taking
    • Article abstract
    • Executive summary
    • Legal decisions
    • Research findings
    • Records of meetings (minutes)
    • ?
  • 10. Group Work
    • Choose a movie you have all seen
    • Take individual time to note the main points of the movie.
    • Share your main points.
  • 11. Summary vs Paraphrase
    • Summary: encapsulates central idea/ideas; shorter (20% of original)
    • Paraphrase: captures essential meaning of something; longer (same length as source); sums up meaning of a source
  • 12. What is a summary?
    • Summing up the central ideas in a concise way.
  • 13. An Example
  • 14. The Original (Alexander Leggatt, Shakespeare’s Face )
    • Pictures can help us organize our ideas, and a picture of a writer can help us organize our ideas about the writer. The tight-drawn line of TS Eliot’s mouth, the broad bare chest of Ernest Hemingway, the Druid-tweeds look of Robertson Davies—all of these are with you in your imagination as you read. Is this a face we can take into our reading of Shakespeare? In particular, how does it relate to what we know of the man and his work in 1603? In particular, how does it relate to what we know of the man and his work in 1603? I stress 1603 because while the Droeshout portrait in the Folio is Shakespeare in black and white, dead and collected, setting his stamp on a posthumous anthology or his work, the Sanders portrait is Shakespeare alive, in colour, in mid-career. The Droeshout face is for book buyers; the Sanders face is the one you might have encountered if you were hanging around the Globe Theatre.
  • 15. Summary
    • We imagine a writer from his or her picture. The new colour portrait of Shakespeare fits his vibrant image more than the former black and white one.
  • 16. Paraphrase
    • Since pictures can be organizational tools, a writer’s portrait can assist us in thinking about a writer by helping us construct notions about him or her. We imagine the look of TS Eliot, Ernest Hemingway, or Robertson Davies from their photos as we read their work. Is the new portrait of Shakespeare in 1603 more fitting with what we know about him? While the earlier Droeshout black and white portrait seems to have marked the image and work of Shakespeare for all time, the new colour Sanders portrait seems more in keeping with the lively figure we conjure up from Shakespeare’s work. One image seems lifeless, while the other represents someone who was very much alive.
  • 17. Summary Skills
    • Separate the thesis, related ideas, rhetorical methods away from the details
    • Express ideas in your own words but don’t alter the meaning
  • 18. Ten Steps
    • Identify reader and title
    • State the complete thesis (controlling idea and supporting reasons).
    • Include significant points
    • Maintain the order (except for the thesis)
    • Maintain the proportion
    • Be neutral
    • Exclude your own response
    • Be brief
    • No quotations except for key words
    • Use present tense
  • 19. Steps to Completing a Summary
    • Read through piece carefully
    • Read piece again and again, until you have main ideas
    • Look at the title, subtitle, and headings (if any)
    • Write an outline with controlling idea and main points (in the same order as the article)
    • Write your summary from the outline
    • Use the present tense
  • 20. Details—exclude these
    • Authorities cited or quoted
    • Research findings, data
    • Examples (brief or extended)
    • Literary devices (eg metaphors, imagery)
  • 21. Active Reading
    • ^ Read with a tool in hand
    • ^ Read the text several times
  • 22. Summary Practice
    • Same groups as movie practice
    • Have one person read the article
    • Listeners: jot down every time you hear a main point
    • When finished reading, decide together on:
      • The first sentence
      • The thesis of the article
      • The major points
  • 23. Summary: Answers (May Vary)
    • First sentence:
      • In the article “Our Environmental Shame” by David Suzuki . . .
    • Thesis:
      • Article emphasizes that Canada must do more to protect species in our country.
  • 24. Summary: Answers (May Vary)
    • Major Points
      • Unlike US/Mexico, no federal legislation to protect
      • Scientists today recognize importance of biodiversity
      • When habitats disappear, animals left without shelter
      • Canada: hosted conferences, but needs to do more
      • Species at Risk Act: policies do not do enough
      • Species cannot continue to disappear/will affect humans
      • Public awareness will help legislation
  • 25. Plagarised Summary
    • Original:
    • The language of guilt and innocence can be misleading since it brings to mind an unqualified contrast between being culpable or not.
    • According to the writer, language connected to guilt and innocence is deceptive because it seems to make us think in terms of being culpable or not.
  • 26. Good Summary
    • Original:
    • The language of guilt and innocence can be misleading since it brings to mind an unqualified contrast between being culpable or not.
    • Lionel K. McPherson believes that how we talk about guilt and innocence can be confusing because it seems to make us judge in an unexamined way who is responsible and who is not.
  • 27. Assignment Expectations
    • Free of grammatical errors
    • Follows guidelines
    • Uses original language (nothing borrowed from the original article)
    • Includes the controlling idea/thesis of the text
    • Does not include small details
    • Does not include your response to the article
    • Follows the ten steps
  • 28. Assignment Details
    • Due: One week today, during class (last 45 minutes)
    • Worth: 5%
    • What to do: write a summary of an article provided in class

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