Your SlideShare is downloading. ×
2010 English150 Week4 Part1
Upcoming SlideShare
Loading in...5
×

Thanks for flagging this SlideShare!

Oops! An error has occurred.

×
Saving this for later? Get the SlideShare app to save on your phone or tablet. Read anywhere, anytime – even offline.
Text the download link to your phone
Standard text messaging rates apply

2010 English150 Week4 Part1

275
views

Published on

Published in: Education

0 Comments
0 Likes
Statistics
Notes
  • Be the first to comment

  • Be the first to like this

No Downloads
Views
Total Views
275
On Slideshare
0
From Embeds
0
Number of Embeds
0
Actions
Shares
0
Downloads
10
Comments
0
Likes
0
Embeds 0
No embeds

Report content
Flagged as inappropriate Flag as inappropriate
Flag as inappropriate

Select your reason for flagging this presentation as inappropriate.

Cancel
No notes for slide

Transcript

  • 1. PARTS OF A PARAGRAPH: REVIEW Week 2, Part 2
  • 2. Today
      • Quiz preparation
      • Parts of the paragraph: the 4-Fs
      • Really really fun group exercise
  • 3. Word of the Day
    • Inchoate
    • Something that is in the beginning stages/disorganized
    • “ The inchoate essay was actually only a draft.”
  • 4. Punctuation
    • Commas
    • Colons
    • Semi-colons
    • Hyphens
    • Brackets
    • Quotations
  • 5. Semi-Colon
    • Treated as a period (full-stop power)
    • Treated as a spice
    • Don’t be fooled by its wink ;
  • 6. Semi-Colon
    • Separates closely related independent clauses that are not joined by a co-con.
    • Examples
      • Injustice is relatively easy to bear; what stings is justice.
      • When I was a boy, I was told that anybody could become president; I’m beginning to believe it.
  • 7. Semi-colon
    • Used for lists in which each item already has punctuation attached.
    • Example
      • Classic science fiction sagas are Star Trek , with Mr. Spock and his large pointed ears; Battlestar Gallactica, with its Cylon Raiders ; and Star Wars , with Han Solo, Luke Skywalker, and Darth Vader.
  • 8. Colon
    • Use before a list or a quote ONLY if what begins is a full sentence.
      • Examples
      • A good rice pudding should include the following: cardamom, cinnamon, and basmati rice.
      • My roommate is guilty of two of the seven sins: gluttony and sloth.
      • Consider the words of 50 cent: “If they hate, then let them hate, and watch the money pile up.”
  • 9. Colon
    • Used to separate two independent clauses if one explains the first.
    • Examples:
      • Faith is like love: It cannot be forced.
  • 10. When not to use a colon
    • Before a list with a dependent clause before it.
    • Examples:
      • My favourite desserts are: pies, cakes, and waffles.
      • The play consists of: drama, suspense, and comedy.
  • 11. Quiz: Next Class
    • Comma splices
    • Semi-colons
    • Colons
    • Commas
  • 12. Paragraph: Mechanics
      • Is 6-12 sentences long—easy reading.
      • Begins with a topic sentence
      • Is indented
      • Expresses ONE idea
      • Includes a transition
      • Is packed with vivid detail
  • 13. The Perfect Paragraph Topic Sentence Point #3 Point #2 Point #1 Concluding Sentence to Summarize and Transition
  • 14. Frank D’Angelo: Topic Sentence Scholar
      • “ Readers will recall more of what they have read and will read more efficiently (i.e. read faster) than they would if writers presented the same information in a less organized and random fashion.”
  • 15. 4-F Test
      • Focus
      • Fine Points
      • Flow
      • Finality
  • 16. Focus: The Topic Sentence
      • Is like a sequel in a movie.
      • Looks in two directions: backwards (to the thesis) and forwards (to the body of the paragraph).
  • 17. Focus: Topic Sentence
      • States not just a fact, but makes a claim.
      • Is a promise to the reader: test that each sentence holds that promise.
      • Has a danger of being too broad or too narrow.
  • 18. Dangerous Topic Sentences
      • Broad
      • Government should be investing in alternative energy sources.
      • Narrow
      • Switchgrass on the Canadian prairies is a useful source of ethanol.
  • 19. Topic Becomes a Topic Sentence
    • Television programming
      • Commercial TV programming for children is more interested in selling products than entertaining or educating young viewers.
  • 20. Fine Points—Details!
      • Supporting details
      • Evidence
      • Examples
      • Justifications
      • Proof
      • Anecdotes
      • Examples
      • Illustrations
      • Analogies
      • First-hand studies (stats and facts)
      • Second-hand studies (journal articles)
  • 21. Linking Focus and Finer Points
    • Three reasons why having a sibling is important.
    • Three reasons why you should get an A in this course.
    • Jon and Kate Plus 8 is exploitative for these three reasons .
  • 22. Flow
      • Comes from how your ideas are arranged:
      • pages 90-93
        • Topic sentence-to-details
        • Details-to-topic sentence
        • Topic-sentence-surrounded by details
  • 23. Flow: Transitions: Adding ideas
      • Also
      • Finally
      • As well as
      • Too
      • In addition
      • Moreover
      • Furthermore
      • Another
      • Again
      • Further
      • First, second …
  • 24. Transitions: Showing Time
      • Later
      • As soon as
      • Until
      • First, last
      • Until
      • While
      • Soon
      • Now
      • Eventually
      • To begin with
      • Afterwards
      • Meanwhile
      • During
  • 25. Transitions: Showing Contrast
      • But
      • In contrast
      • However
      • Yet
      • Despite
      • Although
      • On the other hand
      • Even though
      • Otherwise
      • Conversely
  • 26. Transitions: Showing Similarity
      • Both
      • Each
      • Likewise
      • Like
      • Similarly
      • Also
      • Compared to
  • 27. Transitions: Showing Cause and Effect
      • As a result
      • Consequently
      • Therefore
      • Thus
      • Accordingly
      • So
      • To conclude
      • Hence
      • For this reason
      • Then
  • 28. List of Transitions
    • http://maclife.mcmaster.ca/CSD/accesstomac/images/common.pdf
  • 29. Finality
      • Is the concluding sentence
      • Restates the main point of the paragraph
      • Transitions into the next paragraph.
  • 30. Example of 4-F Paragraph
    • Watching the news before going to sleep can cause sleep disturbance or insomnia. The late-news is often filled with depressing events. As a result, an individual is put into a kind of stage of alert. Images, sounds, or phrases may remain in a person’s immediate consciousness, and therefore may plague the person as he or she tries to settle down and relax. Consequently, overstimulation and restlessness follow. Thus, a person becomes centred on worry and stress. Accordingly, the person becomes aroused rather than calmed into a state of sleep, so late-night news watching is not recommended.
  • 31. Example of a 0-F Paragraph
    • Sports and fitness trends are related to what John Kelly, a University of Illinois sociologist, calls “the Olympic effect.” Since the Olympic Games get such an abundance of media coverage and promotion, adult viewers tend to participate more just before, during, and immediately after the Olympics. The Olympics occur every four years. After the Olympic flurry is over, participation in sports and fitness activities tends to spiral downward again, according to Dr. Kelly. However, casino gambling have increased since 2004.
  • 32. Summaries
    • Present tense
    • Article name/author/ thesis
    • Main points (eg subheadings)
    • Main points even at end of article
    • Editing
    • Ideas/details
    • “ According to the article . . . ”
  • 33. Lottery Time!
  • 34. Blogged Exercise
    • Part 1: generate a list of topics
  • 35. Blogged Exercise
    • Part 2: pick one topic and narrow it
  • 36. Blogged Exercise
    • Part 4: turn this narrow topic into a topic sentence
  • 37. Blogged Exercise
    • Part 5: list 3-4 vivid details that support the topic sentence
  • 38. Blogged Exercise
    • Part 6: choose the best order:
      • Topic sentence-to-details
      • Details-to-topic sentence
      • Topic-sentence-surrounded by details

×