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English170 Week7 Part2
 

English170 Week7 Part2

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    English170 Week7 Part2 English170 Week7 Part2 Presentation Transcript

    • Email Cont’d Week 7, Part 2
    • Reminder
      • Slideshare.net/janegriffith
    • Today
      • Email: Continued
      • Proofreading Quiz
      • Job Search Stuff Back
    • Grammar-rama
      • Bullets (again)
      • Bullets need to be parallel
      • If the lead-in sentence is complete, use a colon
      • If the lead-in sentence is incomplete, use nothing
    • Grammar-rama
      • Practice bullets: page 96
    • Email
      • Most common way to communicate
      • Email replaces memos (in some ways)
      • Quick and easy (blessing and a curse!)
      • Page 81
    • Email Rules
      • Use a salutation (like the letters)
      • Choose a clear subject line
      • Avoid follow-up with complete information
      • Delete emoticons, lower-case letters for personal pronouns, and “net-speak.”
      • End with your complete name and a footer.
    • Email Assignment
      • Choose a scenario from page 86 (different than one you have done before)
      • Create an email that is 500 words long
      • Follow the email rules discussed today
      • Include one bulleted list—make sure it is parallel
      • Pay careful attention to the 7Cs
    • Proofreading
      • Quiz: February 17
      • Will be a sample memo with 10 errors on it in:
        • Comma splices
        • Fragments
        • Memo format
        • Wrong word, right sound (pages 160-161)
    • 3. Fragments
      • Missing a subject, a verb, or includes a subordinating word.
    • Fragments/Incomplete Sentences
        • Easy to recognize apart from other sentences.
        • Difficult to recognize next to related sentences.
    • Fragments/Incomplete Sentences
        • Example: On the old wooden stool in the corner of my grandma’s kitchen.
        • Example: And immediately popped their flares and life vests.
      • On that morning I sat in my usual spot. On the wooden stool in the corner of my grandma’s kitchen.
      • The pilots ejected from the burning plane, landing in the water. And immediately popped their flares and life vests.
    • Test Your Sentence!
            • YES!
              • YES!
              • No!
      Is there a verb? Is there a subject? Is there just a subordinate clause or phrase? Complete Sentence ! No Fragment No Fragment YES. Fragment
    • How to Fix a Fragment
      • Attach the fragment to a nearby sentence.
      • Turn the fragment into a sentence.
    • Try It!
      • At the same time, owners of sports franchises growing fantastically rich.
      • Everyone valued the contract. A fair deal for everyone.
      • I always was nervous in English. Because I am a poor speller.
      • Her piano recital went poorly although she practiced constantly.