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Youth collective identity
 

Youth collective identity

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Presentation - Overview of Everthing you need to know!

Presentation - Overview of Everthing you need to know!

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    Youth collective identity Youth collective identity Presentation Transcript

    • Teenage Riot! Youth, Media and Collective Identity
    • Starter Activity
      • Who is your favourite young person in the media? (real or fictional)
      • Why do you like them?
    • Macro Questions
      • How are teenagers and young people in the media portrayed?
      • Are these portrayals accurate?
      • How does the intended audience influence the messages sent about youth in the media?
      • How do young people create their own representations? How are these different to those created and aimed at adults?
    • Collective Identity What is it? How does the media influence it?
    • Who are you?
      • What makes you different to everyone else?
      • What similarities do you have with others?
      • What social groups do you consider yourself part of?
      • These groups have a ‘collective identity’.
    • Identity and the Media
      • Jacques Lacan – psychoanalyst
      • Mirror stage – child begins to develop their identity.
      • What is our relationship with images on the screen?
      • What pleasures do they offer?
      • Identification
      • Aspiration
    • Influence of the Media
      • How could they affect us?
      • Accurate representations
      • Inaccurate or distorted portrayals
    • Identification/ Aspiration
      • Activity:
      • Look at the example from earlier.
      • Do you identify with this character? Why?
      • Do you aspire to be like this character? Why?
      • Is it a mixture of the two?
    • Richard Jenkins
      • We need to interact in order to form our identity…
      • With other people – or with the media
      • Partaking in an event (in reality, or virtually) with people with whom we feel affinity helps us to form collective identity .
      • Identification
      • Aspiration
      • Solidarity (around media texts)
    • Constructing the Teenager Creating and targeting a youth audience – and what the youth did next….
    • ‘ Youth Culture’ emerges
      • 19 th century ‘Bowery Boys’ or ‘Soaplocks’
      • Recognisable youth culture: own slang, dress code, musical taste etc.
      • First time entertainment and fashion industries targeted a youth group
    • 1900-1940
      • 400% rise in school in high school enrolment in USA
      • ‘ Peer culture’
      • Magazines (and fashion, beauty) industries targeting insecurities of adolescent girls
      • 1940s – WWII = demand for labour = young people with disposable income
    •  
    • 1945-60: Birth of the Teen
      • Economic potential is obvious – market of the future
      • But also the first negative stereotypes
      • Youth simultaneously represented “a prosperous and liberated future” and “a culture of moral decline”
      • First sign of adult culture’s dichotomous image of teenagers
      • Film example: ‘The Wild One’
    • 1950s – Rock’n’Roll Culture
      • Not trying to ‘fit in’ to adult mainstream
      • Happy to rebel against it – first indication of a ‘Generation Gap’
      • In values and lifestyles
    • Adult Hegemony?
      • Hegemony = a dominant social group keeps an oppressed group in their subservient position by making them feel this position is ‘normal’ or desirable.
      • Adult mainstream exploited the image of the ‘rebel teen’
      • Sold to teenagers as aspiration
      • Sold to adults as a fear
    • James Dean – an accurate portrayal of youth?
      • First celebrity to capture the dissonance of youth;
      • ‘ Rebel Without A Cause’ – lots of delinquent behaviour. Conforms to adult fears.
      • But: Dean’s character isn’t a ‘bad boy’ – confused, sensitive, frustrated… and very handsome.
    • James Dean
      • Adults and teenagers could empathise with (and desire) him.
      • ‘ Live fast, die young’ = the start of adults fetishising youth?
    • 1960s and 70s – subculture to counter-culture
      • Next generation of teens very cynical about commercial exploitation of youth.
      • Rebellion chimes with social upheaval
      • Young people support Civil Rights, feminism, anti-Vietnam… the rebels now have a cause.
      • Resistant to marketing and consumerism, wanted to make the world better
      • Film example: ‘Easy Rider’
    • Punk and Hip-Hop
      • Punk = reaction against optimism of ‘hippies’ – even more cynical of mainstream.
      • Not just rebellious or anti-consumerist. Punk was anti-establishment
      • Punk = aesthetic and political rebellion
      • Hip Hop = dealing with reality of poverty and racist oppression
      • Film example: ‘Scratch’
    • Recent article
      • Excellent comparison of current youth subcultures (or ‘tribes’) with those of the past.
      • http://www.guardian.co.uk/music/2010/feb/25/emo-pop-tribes-mods-punks
    • Adult Fetishisation of Youth
    • Who is the intended audience?
      • Adult obsession with youth – why?
      • Recurring pattern:
      • Symbol of a bright future
      • Vs
      • Symbol of world going to hell
    • Women in Journalism Reports
      • ‘“ Am I bovvered?” How is the media shaping the ambitions and aspirations of young women?’
      • “ Hoodies or Altar Boys?” What is media stereotyping doing to our British boys?
    • ‘ Am I bovvered?’
      • Researched images in media and surveyed real teenage girls.
      • Concern over sexualised images in all media – encouraged a morbid preoccupation with beauty and appearance.
    • ‘ Hoodies or Altar Boys’
      • 4,374 out of 8,629 stories in national and regional papers were about youth crime.
      • "yobs" (591 times)
      • "thugs" (254 times )
      • "sick" (119 times)
      • "feral" (96 times)
    • ‘ Hoodies or Altar Boys’
      • Positive phrases: ‘angel’, ‘high-achiever’, ‘model student’, ‘talented sportsman’…
      • … but only used to describe dead boys, and usually the victims of violent crime!
      • 85% of boys surveyed said negative images in media had made them afraid of other teenage boys.
    • Internalised Stereotypes
      • Youthful search for collective identity could result in these representations being internalised and accepted: a self-fulfilling prophecy?
      • ‘ Kidulthood’
      • ‘ Harry Brown’
      • ‘ Anti-youth’ films? Accurate to actual experiences of teenagers?
      • Or conforming to stereotypes circulated by news media?
    • Alternatively…
      • 9-14 year olds spend $300 billion per year in US
      • Companies very keen to target youth: indication of what tastes of the future will be.
      • Morgan Stanley: youth are the “vanguard of the digital revolution”
      • Matthew Parker, intern… opinions made cover of Financial Times!
    • Adult Fetishisation of Youth
      • Film example: ‘American Beauty’
      • What can this tell us about how adults idealise youth?
    • Why do adults idealise youth?
      • Nostalgia – never appreciated youth when they were that age
      • Empathy – adults frustrated with their lives want to be rebels again
      • Envy – teenagers don’t have career, relationship and financial burdens
      • Envious of adolescent sexual drive (in a sexualised culture)
    • Accurate or Idealised?
      • ‘ Juno’ – do kids really talk like this?
      • ‘ Misfits’ / ‘Skins’ – do kids really have these lifestyles?
      • Aimed at teenagers?
      • Or at adults?
      • Film example: ‘Ferris Bueller’s Day Off’
    • Further Study
      • Use similar chart to analyse range of other films/TV featuring teenagers… who are they aimed at? How do the representations appeal to this audience?
      • How teenagers respond to these representations?
      • How do adults respond?
    • Digital Youth How new technology has affected collective identity
    • How do youth trends spread?
      • Traditional Model
      • Global youth was ‘atomised’
      • Trend begins, usually led by a celebrity, in one country (usually USA or UK).
      • Media would then spread this trend
      • Other nations’ youth would spot the trend, adopt it as an easy route to solidarity with other teens,
      • Popularity (and media coverage) would increase in intensity and get a wider spread of distribution.
    • How has digital technology changed this?
      • Young people have grown up taking internet, mobiles, mp3s for granted.
      • Interactivity – opportunity to manipulate the media experience.
      • Instantaneity – ability to access (and experience) media texts ‘on-demand’.
      • ‘ Cloud Culture’ – information (including media texts and experiences) ‘float’ above us, we can ‘reach up’ and ‘grab’ it whenever we want.
    • How do youth trends spread?
      • 21 st Century Model
      • Youths create their own style, their own media;
      • They tell others about it using social networking sites, blogs etc; quality content downloaded and spread by viral.
      • Global reach of the internet means newly invented trends are ‘instantaneously’ spread across the world where they develop or decline according to how many people decide to follow them.
      • Then mainstream media may become involved.
    • Who controls the future of youth culture?