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This is part of a larger workshop that I present with Kathy Catoe on "Using Social Media in Your Job Search"

This is part of a larger workshop that I present with Kathy Catoe on "Using Social Media in Your Job Search"


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  • Get the word out. Tell your network that you’re looking for a new position because a job search these days requires the “law of big numbers” There is no stigma that you’re looking right now, so the more people who know you’re looking, the more likely you’ll find a job. Recently, LinkedIn added “status updates” which you can use to let your network know about your newly emancipated status. Get LinkedIn recommendations from your colleagues. A strong recommendation from your manager highlights your strengths and shows that you were a valued employee. This is especially helpful if you were recently laid off, and there is no better time to ask for this than when your manager is feeling bad because she laid you off. If you were a manager yourself, recommendations from your employees can also highlight leadership qualities. Find out where people with your backgrounds are working. Find companies that employ people like you by doing an advanced search for people in your area who have your skills. For example, if you’re a web developer in Seattle, search profiles in your zip code using keywords with your skills (for example, JavaScript, XHTML, Ruby on Rails) to see which companies employ people like you. Find out where people at a company came from. LinkedIn “Company Profiles” show the career path of people before they began work there. This is very useful data to figure out what a company is looking for in new hires. For example, Microsoft employees worked at Hewlett-Packard and Oracle . Find out where people from a company go next. LinkedIn’s “Company Profiles” also tell you where people go after leaving the company. You can use this to track where people go after leaving your company as well as employees of other companies in your sector. (You could make the case that this feature also enables to figure out which companies to avoid, but I digress.) Check if a company is still hiring. Company pages on LinkedIn include a section called “New Hires” that lists people who have recently joined the company. If you have real chutzpah, you can ask these new hires how they got their new job. At the very least you can examine their backgrounds to surmise what made them attractive to the new employer. Get to the hiring manager. LinkedIn’s job search engine allows you to search for any kind of job you want. However, when you view the results, pay close attention to the ones that you’re no more than two degrees away from. This means that you know someone who knows the person that posted the job—it can’t get much better than that. (Power tip: two degrees is about the limit for getting to hiring managers. I never help friends of friends of friends.) Another way to find companies that you have ties to is by looking at the “Companies in Your Network” section on LinkedIn’s Job Search page. Get to the right HR person. The best case is getting to the hiring manager via someone who knows him, but if that isn’t possible you can still use LinkedIn to find someone inside the company to walk your resume to the hiring manager or HR department. When someone receives a resume from a coworker even if she doesn’t know the coworker, she almost always pays attention to it. Find out the secret job requirements. Job listings rarely spell out entirely or exactly what a hiring manager is seeking. Find a connection at the company who can get the inside scoop on what really matters for the job. You can do this by searching for the company name; the results will show you who in your network connects you to the company. If you don’t have an inside connection, look at profiles of the people who work at the company to get an idea of their backgrounds and important skills. Find startups to join. Maybe this recession is God telling you it’s time to try a startup. But great startups are hard to find. Play around with LinkedIn’s advanced search engine using “startup” or “stealth” in the keyword or company field. You can also narrow by industry (for example, startups in the Web 2.0, wireless, or biotech sectors). If large companies can’t offer “job security,” open up your search to include startups. Build your network before you need it. As a last tip, no matter how the economy or your career is doing, having a strong network is a good form of job security. Don’t wait until times are tough to nurture your network. The key to networking (or “schmozing”), however, is filled with counter-intuitiveness. First, it’s not who you know—it’s who knows of you. Second, Great schmoozers are not thinking “What can this person do for me?” To the contrary, they are thinking, “What can I do for this person?” Read more: http://blog.guykawasaki.com/2009/02/10-ways-to-use.html#ixzz0fR9q38qp
  • Get the word out. Tell your network that you’re looking for a new position because a job search these days requires the “law of big numbers” There is no stigma that you’re looking right now, so the more people who know you’re looking, the more likely you’ll find a job. Recently, LinkedIn added “status updates” which you can use to let your network know about your newly emancipated status. Get LinkedIn recommendations from your colleagues. A strong recommendation from your manager highlights your strengths and shows that you were a valued employee. This is especially helpful if you were recently laid off, and there is no better time to ask for this than when your manager is feeling bad because she laid you off. If you were a manager yourself, recommendations from your employees can also highlight leadership qualities. Find out where people with your backgrounds are working. Find companies that employ people like you by doing an advanced search for people in your area who have your skills. For example, if you’re a web developer in Seattle, search profiles in your zip code using keywords with your skills (for example, JavaScript, XHTML, Ruby on Rails) to see which companies employ people like you. Find out where people at a company came from. LinkedIn “Company Profiles” show the career path of people before they began work there. This is very useful data to figure out what a company is looking for in new hires. For example, Microsoft employees worked at Hewlett-Packard and Oracle . Find out where people from a company go next. LinkedIn’s “Company Profiles” also tell you where people go after leaving the company. You can use this to track where people go after leaving your company as well as employees of other companies in your sector. (You could make the case that this feature also enables to figure out which companies to avoid, but I digress.) Check if a company is still hiring. Company pages on LinkedIn include a section called “New Hires” that lists people who have recently joined the company. If you have real chutzpah, you can ask these new hires how they got their new job. At the very least you can examine their backgrounds to surmise what made them attractive to the new employer. Get to the hiring manager. LinkedIn’s job search engine allows you to search for any kind of job you want. However, when you view the results, pay close attention to the ones that you’re no more than two degrees away from. This means that you know someone who knows the person that posted the job—it can’t get much better than that. (Power tip: two degrees is about the limit for getting to hiring managers. I never help friends of friends of friends.) Another way to find companies that you have ties to is by looking at the “Companies in Your Network” section on LinkedIn’s Job Search page. Get to the right HR person. The best case is getting to the hiring manager via someone who knows him, but if that isn’t possible you can still use LinkedIn to find someone inside the company to walk your resume to the hiring manager or HR department. When someone receives a resume from a coworker even if she doesn’t know the coworker, she almost always pays attention to it. Find out the secret job requirements. Job listings rarely spell out entirely or exactly what a hiring manager is seeking. Find a connection at the company who can get the inside scoop on what really matters for the job. You can do this by searching for the company name; the results will show you who in your network connects you to the company. If you don’t have an inside connection, look at profiles of the people who work at the company to get an idea of their backgrounds and important skills. Find startups to join. Maybe this recession is God telling you it’s time to try a startup. But great startups are hard to find. Play around with LinkedIn’s advanced search engine using “startup” or “stealth” in the keyword or company field. You can also narrow by industry (for example, startups in the Web 2.0, wireless, or biotech sectors). If large companies can’t offer “job security,” open up your search to include startups. Build your network before you need it. As a last tip, no matter how the economy or your career is doing, having a strong network is a good form of job security. Don’t wait until times are tough to nurture your network. The key to networking (or “schmozing”), however, is filled with counter-intuitiveness. First, it’s not who you know—it’s who knows of you. Second, Great schmoozers are not thinking “What can this person do for me?” To the contrary, they are thinking, “What can I do for this person?” Read more: http://blog.guykawasaki.com/2009/02/10-ways-to-use.html#ixzz0fR9q38qp
  • Get the word
  • Keep your profile current! When you are job searching you have to keep your resume current on job boards weekly. That may mean adding period or comma or changing the date at the bottom weekly. Google likes fresh content. Make your Linkedin profile search-friendly by telling your network what you are doing! Link to articles you have written or in which you were quoted. Update the status of your latest blog posts. If you are looking for a job, tell your network what you are looking for. Update your profile when you land!
  • 1. Groups . What better way to keep professional members of the online community informed about products and company information than a group? LinkedIn groups function as a forum for members to have real-world conversations about products, issues, opportunities, events, and referrals of information. For virtually every segment of technology, there is a corresponding group available. One group that I have recently joined for a hot area of technology is the VMware virtualization group . Here, discussions on real-world scenarios offer good information to members on topics ranging from problem-solving to company news and job opportunities. 2. Events . LinkedIn event creation is a newer offering that allows you to create events. LinkedIn Events correspond to real events, such as tradeshows, conferences, and training events. This emerging segment will become a mechanism for events to be accessible to networks of members where professional interests align. Check out this blog post and video by LinkedIn product manager Christina Wodtke on LinkedIn Events. 3. Company profiles. LinkedIn offers company profiles that can be modified by members. Companies are making it a priority to see that these descriptions, information, and company logos are used correctly on LinkedIn. Social media and marketing groups try to ensure not only that the information is accurate but also that it is the kind of information that best promotes the company. While LinkedIn requires a company e-mail address for contributors to be able to edit a company profile, that doesn’t necessarily ensure that it is a company-authorized individual making them. 4. Jobs. LinkedIn has job information through partnerships with Dice and SimplyHired. Ensuring that your advertised positions go beyond Monster.com and into LinkedIn is an extra step that can use the leverage of the LinkedIn network. The beauty is that if one person is not interested in the position, the position can be referred to someone who might be a good fit for the role. This extra link can assist in finding the right candidates in a tough hiring market. 5. The price is right. Most of LinkedIn services are free, so why not take advantage of the extra placement? While the risk of not embracing social media for organizations is not quantified, the cost of embracing it is low. Rick Vanover is an IT Infrastructure
  • Transcript

    • 1. An Overview of LinkedIn ® and Case Studies Part 3 and 4 of the overall presentation: “Using Social Media to Enhance Your Career Opportunities” Jane Bixler M: 940.206.6524 [email_address] www.linkedin.com/in/janebixler www.twitter.com/janebixler (@janebixler) Note: This presentation is best viewed in “Slide Show” mode
    • 2. What is LinkedIn?
      • Social network
        • 60 MM registered users (February 2010)
        • 200 countries and territories / 3 languages
      • Network of business professionals (Connections: 1 st , 2 nd , or 3 rd level)
      • Find experts and ideas
      • Explore opportunities (job, business)
    • 3. What Will LinkedIn Do For Me?
    • 4. Major Parts of a Profile
    • 5. What Makes Profile 100% Complete? (I want to be more searchable)
      • Post current position
      • List two past positions
      • Show education
      • Include
        • Profile summary (heavy on keywords)
        • Specialties (heavy on keywords)
        • Profile photo
        • Need at least 3 recommendations
    • 6.
      • Title
      • Headline
      • Specialties
      • Experience
      • Job titles / name of companies
      • Education
        • School name
        • Field of study
        • Activities and Societies
      What Makes My Profile Rank Higher in a LinkedIn Search? * ** David Lanners 8/11/09
      • Additional information
        • Interests
        • Groups and Associations - Honors and Awards
      • Recommendations
    • 7. Review Visitors & Reading List
    • 8.
      • Research for a specific person or company
      • Get sales opportunities
      • Search in ‘Answers’ section for experts
      • Research by job title for experts or ideas
      Find Opportunities, Experts, and Ideas
    • 9. Events
    • 10. Company Profiles
    • 11.
      • Look up specific person info
      • Look up company bio
      • Look at corporate officer information and job titles
      • Look and join specific Groups
      • Look for people in field
      • Watch for names/companies in ‘People You May Know’ section
      How to Research for Specific Person or Company
    • 12. Research Specific Person
    • 13. Research Specific Person (continued)
    • 14. Research Specific Company
    • 15. Research Specific Company (continued)
    • 16. Research Specific Company (continued)
    • 17. Research Specific Company (continued)
    • 18.
      • Get the word out
      • Get LinkedIn recommendations from your colleagues
      • Find previous employers of target individuals
      • Find out where people from a company go next in their careers
      How to Research for a Job
    • 19.
      • Is the company hiring?
      • Get to the hiring manager
      • Get to the right HR person / recruiter
      • Find out the secret job requirements
      • Find startups to join
      • Build your network before you need it
      How to Research for a Job (continued)
    • 20. Job Search
    • 21. Job Search (continued)
    • 22. Job Search (continued)
    • 23. Job Search (continued)
    • 24. Job Search (continued)
    • 25. Job Search (continued)
    • 26.
      • Update frequently
      • Link to articles you’ve read
      • Update your blog entries (or your company’s blog) to your network
      • List books you’ve read or recommend
      • Upload via Slideshare your presentations to show you as subject matter expert
      Tip: Update and Add
    • 27. Tip: Write a Summary
    • 28. Tip: Make Your Summary Real
    • 29. Tip: Add a Blog
    • 30. Tip: Make a Goal to Complete
    • 31. Tip: Add Old/New Positions
    • 32. Tip: Get Recommended
    • 33. Tip: Add Groups
    • 34.
      • Your personal profile
      • Groups
      • Events
      • Company profiles
      • Jobs
      • And, the price is right
      In Conclusion
    • 35. Case Studies
    • 36. Case Study 1
    • 37. Case Study 2
    • 38. Case Study 3
    • 39. Case Study 4
    • 40. Reference Materials
    • 41. Books   Groundswell by Charlene Li and Josh Bernoff Trust Agents: Using the Web to Build Influence, Improve Reputation, and Earn Trust by Chris Brogan The New Influencers by Paul Gillin I’m on LinkedIn…Now What? by Jason Alba Twitter Power by Joel Comm The Power of WHO by Bob Beaudine Additional Resources
    • 42. Additional Resources Mashable ( www.mashable.com) What’s new on the web and offering social media resources and guides Hubspot Blog (h ttp://blog.hubspot.com) Inbound Marketing -SEO, Blogging, Social Media, Landing Pages, Lead Generation and Analytics Marketing Profs (www.marketingprofs.com ) Marketing statistics and research Marketing Sherpa (www.marketingsherpa.com) Practical marketing case studies and know-how Social Media Today (www.socialmediatoday.com) A social media community for the web’s best thinkers and web 2.0 Personal Branding Blog (www.personalbrandingblog.com) Dan Schawbel’s blog for personal branding online iMEDIA Connection (www.imediaconnection.com) Marketing strategies and connections Sociable Blog (www.sociableblog.com) Social networking and social media news Social Networking Weblog (www.socialnetworking-weblog.com) Social side of the net - social software and social networking Search Engine Weblog (www.searchengine-weblog.com) Guide to search engine optimization, usage and online marketing Career Solutions (www.careersolutionsworkshop.org) Not-for-profit organization dedicated to equipping individuals with job and career skills Websites
    • 43. Additional Resources search.twitter.com Search users’ tweets www.tweepsearch.com Profile and bio search www.tweetmyjobs.com Job board for recruiters, hiring managers, and job seekers www.twellow.com Twitter yellow pages/name, location, bio and category http://tweepml.org/Employers-Recruiting-on-Twitter A list of employers and recruitment consultants using Twitter www.careerrocketeer.com/2009/09/top-100-job-search-hashtags-on-twitter.html Top 100 job search #Hashtags Twitter Tools for Job Search
    • 44. Additional Resources www.hootsuite.com www.tweetdeck.com www.socialoomph.com www.pingfm.com www.nomee.com Management Tools
    • 45. Glossary of Terms Aggregation is the process of gathering and remixing content from blogs and other websites that provide RSS feeds. The results may be displayed in an aggregator website like Bloglines, or directly on your desktop using software often also called a newsreader. Authenticity is the sense that something or someone is “real”. Blogs enable people to publish content, and engage in conversations, that show their interests and values, and so help develop an authentic voice online. Blogs are websites with dated items of content in reverse chronological order, self-published by bloggers. Items – sometimes called posts - may have keyword tags associated with them, are usually available as feeds, and often allow commenting. Bookmarking is saving the address of a website or item of content, either in your browser or on a social bookmarking site like del.icio.us. If you add tags, others can easily use your research too A browser is the tool used to view websites, and access all the content available there onscreen or by downloading. Browsers may also be used to upload or otherwise contribute content to a blog or other website. Bulletin boards were the early vehicles for online collaboration, where users connected with a central computer to post and read email-like messages. They were the electronic equivalent of public notice boards. The term is still used for forums. Chat is interaction on a web site, with a number of people adding text items one after the other into the same space at (almost) the same time. A place for chat – chat room – differs from a forum because conversations happen in “real time”, rather as they do face to face.
    • 46. Glossary of Terms (continued) Collaboration : social media tools from email lists to virtual worlds offer enormous scope for collaboration. Low-risk activities like commenting, social bookmarking, chatting and blogging help develop the trust necessary for collaboration. Commitment : the “social” aspect of social media means that tools are most useful when other people commit to using them too. Commitment will depend on people’s degree of interest in a subject, capability online, preparedness to share with others, degree of comfort in a new place, as well as the usability of the site or tool. Online communities are groups of people communicating mainly through the Internet. They may simply have a shared interest to talk about ... or more formally learn from each other and find solutions as a Community of Practice. Online communities may use email lists or forums, where content is centralized. Communities may also emerge from conversations around or between bloggers. Content is used here to describe text, pictures, video and any other meaningful material that is on the Internet. Control : social networking is difficult to control because if people can't say something in one place they can blog or comment elsewhere. That can be challenging for hierarchical organizations used to centrally-managed websites. Conversation through blogging, commenting or contributing to forums is the currency of social networking. Copyright : sharing through social media is enhanced by attaching a Creative Commons license specifying, for example, that content may be re-used with attribution, provided that a similar license is then attached by the new author.
    • 47. Glossary of Terms (continued) Crowdsourcing refers to harnessing the skills and enthusiasm of those outside an organization who are prepared to volunteer their time contributing content and solving problems. Culture : social media only works well in a culture of openness, where people are prepared to share. For that reason, commitment and attitude are as important as tools. To download is to retrieve a file or other content from an Internet site to your computer or other device. See Upload. Email lists , or groups, are important networking tools offering the facility to “starburst” a message from a central postbox to any number of subscribers, and for them to respond. Lists usually also offer a facility for reading and replying through a web page - so they can also operate like forums. Face-to-face (f2) is used to describe people meeting offline. While social media may reduce the need to meet, direct contact gives far more clues, quickly, about a person than you can get online. Online interaction is likely to be richer after f2f meetings. Feeds are the means by which you can read, view or listen to items from blogs and other RSS-enabled sites without visiting the site, by subscribing and using an aggregator or newsreader. Feeds contain the content of an item and any associated tags without the design or structure of a web page. Forums are discussion areas on websites, where people can post messages or comment on existing messages asynchronously – that is, independently of time or place time. Chat is the synchronous equivalent.
    • 48. Glossary of Terms (continued) Groups are collections of individuals with some sense of unity through their activities, interests or values. They are bounded: you are in a group, or not. They differ in this from networks, which are dispersed, and defined by nodes and connections. Instant messaging (IM) is chat with one other person. Links are the highlighted text or images that, when clicked, jump you from one web page or item of content to another. Bloggers use links a lot when writing, to reference their own or other content. Lurkers are people who read but don't contribute or add comments to forums. The one per cent rule-of-thumb suggests about one per cent of people contribute new content to an online community, another nine percent comment, and the rest lurk. However, this may not be a passive role because content read on forums may spark interaction elsewhere. Membership involves belonging to a group. Networking can offer some of the benefits of group membership, without the need for as much central co-ordination. A rise in networking may present challenges for organizations who depend on membership for funds or to demonstrate their credibility. Networks are structures defined by nodes and the connections between them. In social networks the nodes are people, and the connections are the relationships that they have. Networking is the process by which you develop and strengthen those relationships. Newsreader See aggregator.
    • 49. Glossary of Terms (continued) Online means being connected to the Internet, and also being there in the sense of reading or producing content. Offline means not online, that is, not connected to the Internet. It may refer to an unconnected computer, or activities taking place without the benefit (or perhaps distraction) of a connection. Openness is being prepared to share and collaborate – something aided by social media. Open source software - developed collaboratively with few constraints on its use - is a technical example. In order to be open online you may offer share-alike copyright licenses, and you may tag content and link generously to other people's content. This demonstrates open source thinking. Peer to peer refers to direct interaction between two people in a network. In that network, each peer will be connected to other peers, opening the opportunity for further sharing and learning. A platform is the framework or system within which tools work. That platform may be as broad as mobile telephony, or as narrow as a piece of software that has different modules like blogs, forums, and wikis in a suite of tools. As more and more tools operate "out there" on the web, rather than on your desktop, people refer to "the Internet as the platform. A podcast is audio or video content that can be downloaded automatically through a subscription to a website so you can view or listen offline. Profiles are the information that you provide about yourself when signing up for a social networking site. As well as a picture and basic information, this may include your personal and business interests, a "blurb" about yourself, and tags to help people search for like-minded people.
    • 50. Glossary of Terms (continued) Remixing : social media offers the possibility of taking different items of content, identified by tags and published through feeds, and combining them in different ways. You can do this with other people's content if they add an appropriate copyright license. Roles : parties need hosting, committees need chairing, working groups may need facilitation. Online networks and communities need support from people who may be called, for example, technology stewards or network weavers. Champions are the core group of enthusiasts you need to start a community. RSS is short for Really Simple Syndication. This allows you to subscribe to content on blogs and other social media and have it delivered to you through a feed. Searching for information on the Net is done using a search engine, of which Google is the best known. Specialist search engines like Technorati concentrate on blogs. As well as searching by word or phrase you can search on tags, and so find content others have keyworded. Sharing is offering other people the use of your text, images, video, bookmarks or other content by adding tags, and applying copyright licenses that encourage use of content. Social media is a terms for the tools and platforms people use to publish, converse and share content online. The tools include blogs, wikis, podcasts, and sites to share photos and bookmarks. Social networking sites are online places where users can create a profile for themselves, and then socialize with others using a range of social media tools including blogs, video, images, tagging, lists of friends, forums and messaging.
    • 51. Glossary of Terms (continued) Stories, as well as conversations, are a strong theme in blogging. Anecdotes, bits of gossip and longer narratives work particularly well on blogs if they have a personal angle. It helps others get to know the blogger - and helps the blogger find and extend their voice. Subscribing is the process of adding an RSS feed to your aggregator or newsreader. It's the online equivalent of signing up for a magazine, but usually free. Tags are keywords attached to a blog post, bookmark, photo or other item of content so you and others can find them easily through searches and aggregation. Terms of services are the basis on which you agree to use a forum or other web-based place for creating or sharing content. Check before agreeing what rights the site owners may claim over your content. Threads are strands of conversation. On an email list or web forum they will be defined by messages that use the use the same subject. On blogs they are less clearly defined, but emerge through comments and trackbacks. Tool is used here as shorthand for a software applications on your computer, and also for applications that are Web-based. Trackback : some blogs provide a facility for other bloggers to leave a calling card automatically, instead of commenting. Blogger A may write on blog A about an item on blogger B's site, and through the trackback facility leave a link on B's site back to A. The collection of comments and trackbacks on a site facilitates conversations.
    • 52. Glossary of Terms (continued) Transparency : Enhancing searching, sharing, self-publish and commenting across networks makes it easier to find out what's going on in any situation where there is online activity. To upload is to transfer a file or other content from your computer to an Internet site. User generated content is text, photos and other material produced by people who previously just consumed. See content. Virtual worlds are online places like Second Life, where you can create a representation of yourself (an avatar) and socialize with other residents. Basic activity is free, but you can buy currency (using real money) in order to purchase land and trade with other residents. Second Life is being used by some voluntary organizations to run discussions, virtual events and fundraising Voice over Internet Protocol (VOIP) enables you to use a computer or other Internet device for phone calls without additional charge. Web 2.0 is a term coined by O'Reilly Media in 2004 to describe blogs, wikis, social networking sites and other Internet-based services that emphasize collaboration and sharing, rather than less interactive publishing (Web 1.0). It is associated with the idea of the Internet as platform. A wiki is a web page - or set of pages - that can be edited collaboratively. The best known example is wikipedia, an encyclopedia created by thousands of contributors across the world. Once people have appropriate permissions - set by the wiki owner - they can create pages and/or add to and alter existing pages.

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