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Fiberglass Insulation

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  • 1. Fiberglass Insulation
    By: James Bailey &Danielle Ballard
    http://www.flickr.com/photos/juniorvelo/3463629589
  • 2. What is Fiberglass Insulation?
    Leading insulation material
    Blanket or loose-fill
    Used in buildings, pipes, roofs, walls
    Controls temperature and sound
    Reduces transmission of moisture
    Helps resist moisture vapor
    Yearly business revenue is $8.5 million
    Expected to grow with renewed growth
  • 3. Manufacturing Fiberglass Insulation
    Glass is melted & liquid is spun to create fibers
    Binder is added to fiberglass to hold it together
    Most common binder is phenol-formaldehyde
    Alternative binders with lower VOC are available
    Alternative binders: Acrylic (JM) and renewable bio-based (Knauf)
    Minimum of 30% recycled glass
  • 4. Regulatory VOC Limits
    No determined standard for formaldehyde in residential settings
    OSHA and NIOSH have set up occupational limits
    OSHA sets PEL/TWA at 750 ppb
    OSHA sets PEL/STEL at 2000 ppb
    NIOSH sets TWA at 16 ppb
  • 5. Volatile Organic Compounds (VOCs)
    Most fiberglass insulation contains VOCs
    A VOC of major concern is formaldehyde
    Irritates eyes, nose, throat, and lungs; can be a carcinogen
    Just one of many VOCs
    Formaldehyde free brands are available
  • 6. www.appropedia.org/VOCs_in_fiberglass_insulation
  • 7. Manufacturers of Fiberglass Insulation
    GreenguardIndoor Air Quality Certified
    Environmental institute that
    protects human health
    Researches product emissions
    Determines appropriate levels of emissions
    Certifies products with low emissions
    Certified companies: CertainTeed, Guardian Fiberglass, Johns Manville, Knauf, Owens Corning
  • 8. Alternatives to Fiberglass Insulation
    Cotton batts (denim): Ultra touch, low energy manufacture, no VOCs
    Mineral wool: 75% post-industrial recycled content
    Cellulose loose fill: sprayed, settles
    Sprayed polyurethane foam: expands, high R-value
    Recycled newspapers: superior insulator
    Soy-based foam: healthier, benefits of spray foam
    Rigid foam board: expensive, used at edges of concrete
    Perlite: light weight, enhances fire ratings, rot resistant
    http://www.instructables.com/id/istalling-Ultra-touch-recycled-cotton-demin-ins/
    http://www.flickr.com/photos/kathyastone/3030049468
  • 9. Do Fumes Get Into Indoor Air?
    2 types: petroleum & excess binder
    Petroleum smell is from recently manufactured fiberglass
    Goes away in a few days
    Residual binder causes another type of odor
    Smells fishy or urine-like
    Dissipates slower than petroleum smell, depends on amount of binder left
    To speed the removal, ventilate area