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Exploring student and teacher engagement in learning activities with e-textbooks

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Researchers and educators progressively acknowledge literacy as plural and varied in nature, a process which encompasses the production and understanding of multiple forms of representation, deeply …

Researchers and educators progressively acknowledge literacy as plural and varied in nature, a process which encompasses the production and understanding of multiple forms of representation, deeply rooted in the social contexts and practices of a given society. The technologies of the digital society offer different potentials for learning. E-books are one of such new technologies. This article presents an exploratory study on the use of e-textbooks in a primary education classroom. It examines student’s meaning making practices and the perceptions that teachers and students have towards their engagement in learning activities in this context. In the analysis of the data generated, the classroom is considered as a multimodal learning space, where virtual, physical and cognitive environments overlap. Students negotiate meaning across multiple contexts and reflect upon it. Our results show that however e-textbooks favour a communicative active style of learning, there still are real challenges to be overcome by e-textbook editorials so that it does not become the next forgotten fad.

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  • 1. EXPLORINGSTUDENT AND TEACHERENGAGEMENT IN LEARNINGACTIVITIES WITH E-TEXTBOOKS
  • 2. INFINITE VARIETY OF RESOURCESEducatorsuse toolsthatenhancesocialnetworkingandknowledgesharingon a globalscale.
  • 3. WHAT ABOUT TEXTBOOKS?Textbookshave beenacknowledgedas having arole as adriver of theclassroomexperience.
  • 4. NEW KINDS OF READING EXPERIENCESAccording tothe2011 HorizonReport,electronicbooks aremovingcloser tomainstreamadoption foreducationalinstitutions.
  • 5. TEXTBOOKS DON’T PRECISELY BOOST POPULARITYTextbookchoice is  Still image ofsaid to knowledge .often bemade in  Restricted source ofhaste, information.based onpersonal  Theoretical-onlypreference approaches toandaffected by learning.factorsunrelated topedagogy .
  • 6. E-TEXTBOOKS DO!E-textbooksaddress ageneration ofstudents thatvalues rapidinformationexchange,instantgratification,and atendencytowardsreduced or notextbookreading.
  • 7. OR DON’T THEY?Many nowbelievecreativeeducators donot neede-textbooks.Sucheducatorscan find inthe Internetall they needto developthecurriculum.
  • 8. A MULTIMODAL LENS ON LITERACY AND LEARNINGPedagogicalpractices andlearningprocesses areseen as adesignprocess: weare constantlymakingconditionedby manycircumstances.
  • 9. A CASE STUDYHow are e- The datatextbooksbeing used in  Video recording and class observational notes.classroom andhow is their  In-depth focus group interviews.use perceivedby teachers  E-textbook online platform.and studentsengaging inlearningactivities withthem?
  • 10. SOME RESULTS 1/3Hardly any timeof all studentsconcentratingin the teacher.
  • 11. SOME RESULTS 2/3Plentyreciprocalinteraction andsupportbetweenstudents.
  • 12. SOME RESULTS 3/3Coexistenceof traditionaland digitalliteracytechnologiesin thepedagogicalpractice.
  • 13. A SHARED VIEW, DIFFERENT PERCEPTIONS. ‘I like it because you have everything at hand, then it isBoth the easier to use the digital textbook than other things.’teacher and (Student)the studentsthink the e- ‘I like very much to use this (e-textbooks) because it is new. Itextbook like to use these things that are new and besides, when youused in class have doubts you can search in Wikipedia and things likepresentsvery specific, that…’ (Student)concreteinformation. One of the bad things about this digital text (e- textbook) is that it is too concrete. I mean, it gives you little opportunity to make a more comprehensive reading. I don’t know, it is too literal, like, I read it here, I write it there.’ (Teacher)
  • 14. THE ECONOMIC ASPECT ‘You can find it all on the Internet, and here (e-Not textbooks) you have to pay. You have to pay forreally the platform and for the educational resources. Ifa you have it well structured, you can find it all ontransition the net.’ (Teacher)
  • 15. THE TECNICHAL ASPECT Many of the students complained about theThe need to Internet being too slow, which can make thehave flash presentations, animations and videos of theenough new desired generation of e-textbooks morebroadband difficult to access.width to beable toaccess thee-textbook.
  • 16. CONCLUSIONS E-textbooks favour a rich supportive distributed learning environment. The students seemed to have a more positive perception of e-textbooks than the teacher. E-textbook users’ perceptions greatly depend on the institutional culture in which they are embedded.
  • 17. IN SUMMARY Although e-textbooks favour a communicative active style of learning, there still are real challenges to be overcome by e-textbook editorials so that it does not become the next forgotten fad...
  • 18. janaina.oliveira@urv.cat mar.camacho@urv.cat merce.gisbert@urv.cat UNIVERSITAT ROVIRA I VIRGILI FACULTAT DE CIÈNCIES DE L’EDUCACIÓ I PSICOLOGIAAPPLIED RESEARCH GROUP IN EDUCATIONAL TECHNOLOGY ARGET