The effect of tension and wavelength on frequency

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Ms. Parker's notes on April 18,2011

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The effect of tension and wavelength on frequency

  1. 1. Good Afternoon!<br />Today we will:<br />Complete Investigation 5.3<br />Take notes<br />Complete a Success Criteria Check<br />Please do before the bell:<br />get your lab notebook<br />get out something to write with<br />open your textbook to pg 508<br />
  2. 2. Investigation 5.3<br />Read pg 508 – 510. Pay special attention to the two different lab set-ups we will be using.<br />5 min<br />
  3. 3. Investigation 5.3<br />Groups of 4<br />Materials:<br />clamp<br />cup<br />pulley<br />fishing line<br />mass<br />goggles<br />SAFETY:<br />Do not stand with your foot under the hanging mass<br />Goggles must be worn when string is under tension<br />
  4. 4. Wavelength, Wave Speed, and Frequency<br />Read pg 510 – 512<br />As you read, be on the look-out for:<br />the effect of wavelength on frequency & pitch<br />the effect of wave speed on frequency & pitch<br />8 min<br />
  5. 5. Wavelength, Wave Speed, and Frequency<br />Standing Wave: also known as a stationary wave: a wave that remains in a constant position.<br />The length of the vibrating string in the lab determined the length of your standing wave.<br />
  6. 6. Wavelength, Wave Speed, and Frequency<br />If your string was 40 cm, then the wavelength of the lowest frequency standing wave was 80 cm.<br />The length of the string is always ½ the wavelength of the lowest frequency standing wave<br />
  7. 7. Lowest Frequency Standing Wave<br />
  8. 8. Wavelength v Frequency<br />What were the two ways you could get a higher frequency in today’s lab?<br />shorten the string<br />add tension<br />v = fλ<br />rearrange this formula in your notes to isolate for frequency<br />
  9. 9. Wavelength v Frequency<br />f = v/λ<br />Look at your lab data for steps 4 & 5. Does your data reflect this relationship between wavelength and frequency?<br />
  10. 10. Wavelength v Frequency<br />f = v/λ<br />The relationship between wavelength and frequency is inverse.<br />In an inverse relationship, decreasing one variable (such as wavelength)increases the other (in this case, frequency)<br />
  11. 11. Tension v Frequency<br />Think back to the first lab we did with the string, pulley, clamp, and mass.<br />What effect did tension have on pitch?<br />increasing the tension increased the pitch<br />
  12. 12. Tension v Frequency<br />Increasing tension did not change the wavelength!<br />So how does increased tension result in an increased pitch?<br />increased tension on the string increases the wave speed<br />
  13. 13. Wave Speed v Frequency<br />f = v/λ<br />Looking at the formula, what happens if λ is held constant while velocity is increased?<br />frequency is increased<br />
  14. 14. Wave Speed v Frequency<br />f = v/λ<br />The relationship between wave speed and frequency is a direct relationship.<br />In a direct relationship, when one variable is increased, the other variable increases as well.<br />

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