GARDENWORMERY  GUIDEHow To Start Your  Own Garden   Wormery     http://www.gardenwormeryguide.com  Copyright gardenwormery...
LEGAL NOTICEThe Publisher has strived to be as accurate and complete as possible in the creation of this report,notwithsta...
CONTENTSHOW TO START YOUR OWN GARDEN WORMERY   Introduction To Wormeries   All About Wormeries – Understanding Vermicult...
Introduction to WormeriesWhen most people think of worms, their first reaction is one of disgust. Theyre creepy. Theyrecra...
All About Wormeries: Understanding VermicultureVermiculture is the process by which worms break down food and plant waste ...
BENEFITS OF WORMERIESThe biggest benefit of a wormery is the vermicompost, or worm manure. Vermicompost is anexcellent fer...
 Helping Kids LearnPerhaps one of the most important aspects of a wormery, however, is how it can benefit kids. Notonly d...
Building a WormeryBuilding a wormery doesnt have to complicated or costly. Although there are many high-qualitywormeries t...
In addition to these concerns, there is also a matter of smell. Many people find that the completesystems you purchase oft...
THE WORMERY ENVIRONMENTA wormery is also known as a home vermiculture system or a worm box. No matter what you call it,how...
 pH LevelspH is what is used to measure the acidity or basicity of an organism. In humans, a good pH level isaround 7.4, ...
Did You Know?Worms are hermaphroditic, which means they have both male and female sex organs. This makesreproduction easy,...
6. When youre placing the worms inside the wormery, put them on top of the bedding.        Theres no need to worry – theyl...
Maintaining Your WormeryOne of the greatest things about a wormery is that it requires little work on your part. The one t...
   Garlic       Spicy foods       Anything with insecticides or pesticides       Salt       Oil       Soap or other ...
With all this eating, digesting, and breeding taking place, its only natural that some of your wormswill die, as well. The...
taken up in the fresh side. You can simply scoop up the vermicompost on the now abandoned sideand start all over again.   ...
generation of responsible global citizens who understand the delicate balance between the food weeat and the animals and p...
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Garden wormery-guide

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A guide dedicated to helping you set up your own wormery in the comfort of your garden. This eBook coves vital topics such as The Benefits of Wormeries and How To Build a Wormery.

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  • Hi there, if anyone needs a practical guide on how to build a wormery / vermicompost here is one http://www.kompostherstellung.de/
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Garden wormery-guide

  1. 1. GARDENWORMERY GUIDEHow To Start Your Own Garden Wormery http://www.gardenwormeryguide.com Copyright gardenwormeryguide.com – all rights reserved.
  2. 2. LEGAL NOTICEThe Publisher has strived to be as accurate and complete as possible in the creation of this report,notwithstanding the fact that he does not warrant or represent at any time that the contents withinare accurate due to the rapidly changing nature of the Internet.The Publisher will not be responsible for any losses or damages of any kind incurred by the readerwhether directly or indirectly arising from the use of the information found in this report.This report is intended for use as informational purposes only.No guarantees are made. Reader assumes responsibility for use of information contained herein.The author reserves the right to make changes without notice. The Publisher assumes noresponsibility or liability whatsoever on the behalf of the reader of this report.YOU HAVE GIVEAWAY RIGHTS TO THIS EBOOK:Gardenwormeryguide.com grants you a giveaway license to this ebook. This means that you can giveaway it away any legal method as long as you do not alter or change the ebook content in any waywhatsoever.[YES] Can be given away[YES] Can be added to free membership sites[YES] Can be added to paid membership sites[YES] Can be packaged with other products[YES] Can be bundled with other products[NO] Can alter the content[NO] Can be sold[NO] Can sell Resale Rights[NO] Can sell Master Resale Rights[NO] Can be offered through auction sites[NO] Can sell Private Label Rights Copyright gardenwormeryguide.com – all rights reserved.
  3. 3. CONTENTSHOW TO START YOUR OWN GARDEN WORMERY  Introduction To Wormeries  All About Wormeries – Understanding Vermiculture o What Is A wormery o Benefits Of wormeries  Building A Wormery o Wormery Containers o Wormery Bedding o The Wormery Environment o What Worms To Use o Building Your Wormery  Maintaining Your Wormery o Feeding The Worms o Keeping The Worms Happy o Harvesting The Vermicompost o How To Use The Vermicompost Copyright gardenwormeryguide.com – all rights reserved.
  4. 4. Introduction to WormeriesWhen most people think of worms, their first reaction is one of disgust. Theyre creepy. Theyrecrawly. They belong on the end of a fishing pole.However, worms are an integral part of our ecosystem, and one whose value has never been moreimportant. In the face of global warming, more and more individuals are taking responsibility fortheir own recycling and food production efforts. From neighborhood gardens to backyard compostpiles, people everywhere are finding that getting out of doors and into the dirt is the first great wayto start giving back to the planet. And theres simply no way to get into the dirt without payinghomage to the worm.Despite their bad reputation, worms are one of the healthiest parts of any thriving garden. Theyburrow through the dirt, which not only provides a way for oxygen to reach the soil, but it alsomeans they leave a trail behind them. By burrowing, worms are really eating the food and plantmatter in the dirt, processing it in their bodies and excreting it out the other side. Although thissounds rather disgusting, the reality is that what the worms leave behind is a nutrient-rich material,called vermicompost, we need to grow plants.Wormeries are our way of tapping into the power of the worm and harvesting that vermicompostfor our own use. Copyright gardenwormeryguide.com – all rights reserved.
  5. 5. All About Wormeries: Understanding VermicultureVermiculture is the process by which worms break down food and plant waste and turn it into a richcompost used to fertilize gardens and grow plants.The use of worms for farming and human benefit has been around for thousands of years. Wormshave always been believed to be an important part of the earths life cycles, taking a place in ancientChinese medicine and even appearing in Aristotles writings about the soil. However, as late as thelate 1800s, people assumed worms were bad for farming. Because they burrowed in the earth, itwas believed that they were eating the roots of the plant and destroying crops.Fortunately, scientist Charles Darwin found that earthworms, instead of damaging crops, wereactually helping them to grow faster and stronger. In 1881, he published his findings in “TheFormation of Vegetable Mould Through the Action of Worms with Observations on their Habits,”and the science of vermiculture was born.WHAT IS A WORMERY?A wormery is basically a “worm farm.” Also known as a worm composting system, it is essentially abox or other self-contained system in which worms live and reproduce. Although this makes it soundlike a wormery is built to breed worms, its actually used to break down food and plant matter intovermicompost. Like a compost pile or other composting system, its a way to recycle your kitchenscraps to make a rich, completely natural fertilizer – right in your own backyard.Wormeries take on a variety of formats, ranging from quick-and-easy science projects to more well-kept factories for commercial production. In fact, there are some farms that specialize in wormeries,producing vermicompost for sale and use in agriculture. In most cases, however, wormeries arefound in individual backyards or by use in restaurants or other commercial kitchens. Wormeries canbe purchased from stores or made from materials you have around the house (or ones you canpurchase for less than youll spend on a bag of fertilizer).Wormeries are built inside a box or other contained structure. They are composed of several layersin which the worms live and work. The bottom is made of a thin layer of soil or other dirt-likematerial, on top of which is placed a layer of “bedding” usually made of paper scraps. Kitchen andplant waste is placed on top of this bedding, followed by a lid that keeps light (and other critters) out– and keeps the moisture in.Most of the time, the worms live just below the bedding. They feed on the kitchen waste,transforming the food into vermicompost, which you then harvest for use in your garden. Dependingon the size of the system, you can house thousands of worms at a time, transforming almost all thewaste from your house into one of the most beneficial, organic fertilizers known to mankind. Copyright gardenwormeryguide.com – all rights reserved.
  6. 6. BENEFITS OF WORMERIESThe biggest benefit of a wormery is the vermicompost, or worm manure. Vermicompost is anexcellent fertilizer for plants and gardens, and research suggests that there is no alternative quitelike it. Unlike animal manure, it has almost no scent, and it can be used on almost any type of plant.Some of its key characteristics include:  Improving the soil (making it more fertile and aerated)  Increasing the level of moisture retention (which means it takes less water to grow the plants)  Promoting healthy roots  Adding important enzymes and microorganisms to the soil  Increasing the yield of the garden or plant  Producing larger, tastier fruits and vegetables  Helping to keep diseases and pests at bay  Attracting natural earthworms already present in the soilThe benefits of a wormery arent all about the plants, however. While the primary purpose is toincrease the quality and yield of plant life, wormeries are also a great way to save money, improvethe environment, and help kids to learn about the ecosystem.  Saving MoneyOne of the most important aspects of any composting system is the amount of garbage reduction itoffers. Kitchen scraps and other biowastes take up a large portion of the average family garbageoutput – in fact, experts estimate that 20 million tonnes of food is thrown away every year in the UKalone! With a wormery, you should be able to reduce your annual garbage output and make use ofthat waste.Because you can make a wormery out of many materials you already have at home (an old plasticbin, shredded newspaper, etc.), you can also access rich fertilizer for almost no money. When usedfor personal or community gardens, the benefits mean more produce for your kitchen table at afraction of the cost.  Improving the EnvironmentAt an individual level, creating and maintaining a wormery means that your garbage output isreduced. When done at a larger level (such as for agriculture), the results have a much moreimportant impact. The amount of energy necessary to run a wormery is fairly low, and thegreenhouse gas emissions are greatly reduced.Vermicompost is also incredibly good at replacing harmful insecticides and pesticides. It is a naturalalternative to chemical plant fertilizers, which could, if applied on a world-wide level, play a majorrole in reducing the impact of farming on the environment. It is also becoming increasingly popularin third world countries, where soil quality has a negative impact on the viability of farming. Copyright gardenwormeryguide.com – all rights reserved.
  7. 7.  Helping Kids LearnPerhaps one of the most important aspects of a wormery, however, is how it can benefit kids. Notonly do children learn about the importance of recycling food waste and giving back to the earth, butthe science of composting and vermiculture offers countless opportunities for education. Fromanimal life cycles to the minerals in soil, kids get a hands-on learning approach to science.Some of the learning opportunities in a wormery include:  How worms eat and break down plant matter  Worm life cycles and reproduction  Caring for living organisms  Building and construction of the wormery  The role of bacteria fungi in decomposition  Temperature and volume regulation  The chemicals and minerals that remain after the decomposition is complete  How these chemicals and minerals benefit new growth  Planting and growing a gardenThis is a learning opportunity for many parents, too. Although wormeries tend to be easy to buildand run, you may discover just how important it is to be mindful of your waste products as yourworms set about the task of decomposing it all for you! Discover The Secrets To Building Your Own Solar and Wind Power Generators For Less Than You Think and Save 80% On Your Electric Bill PLEASE CLICK HERE FOR MORE INFO Copyright gardenwormeryguide.com – all rights reserved.
  8. 8. Building a WormeryBuilding a wormery doesnt have to complicated or costly. Although there are many high-qualitywormeries that you can purchase online or in organic gardening shops, most people already have allthe materials they need to get started.WORMERY CONTAINERSThe size of your wormery depends entirely upon you. If you purchase one from a vendor, thereshould be several size options, ranging from large, elaborate systems to smaller, family-orientedones. The larger ones tend to look like (and in fact, often are) plastic garbage cans. Smaller, simplerones can be constructed in a plastic bottle or even in a shallow plastic bin.The most important thing to take into account when choosing a wormery size is how much kitchenand plant waste youll be feeding into it. A family of four to six people typically produces two tothree kilograms of kitchen waste per week, and is best served by a smaller box (30 by 60 cm) aboutone meter deep. Two people can usually use a box of the same height and width, but only half ameter deep.If youll be building a larger wormery for use in a school or restaurant kitchen, you may need toconsider purchasing a ready-made system, using several smaller ones, or upgrading to a larger box.Youll also need to keep location in mind. There is no reason why a wormery cant flourish insideyour home or apartment, but many people find that its much easier to keep the wormery out of theday-to-day process of living.The great thing about wormery boxes is that they dont have to be fancy – the worms dont carewhether theyre living in a small wooden box or an elaborate poroous plastic vermiculture system. Ifyoull be making one of your own, you can use:  Wooden pallets  Plastic containers  Converted garbage pails  Large jars with a spout at the bottom  Styrofoam coolersWormery Tip:If you use a container that cannot be converted to include a spout at the bottom, your wormerywont last forever. You need a way to drain the excess fluid that builds up as the worms do theirwork. Otherwise, they run the risk of drowning in their own “juices.”Although you can use any of the above materials in making your wormery, some will do better thanothers. Plastic containers have the least amount of toxicity, but they dont absorb any of the liquids,so they have to be drained more often. Styrofoam may release toxins into the worms environmentover time, and metal containers left in the sun can increase the wormery temperature to dangerouslevels. (They also tend to rust over time.) Many woods, including some types cedar and redwood,might release dangerous oils into the worms environment. Inexpensive and rot-resistant woods (likehemlock) tend to do fairly well, but they will eventually need to be replaced. Copyright gardenwormeryguide.com – all rights reserved.
  9. 9. In addition to these concerns, there is also a matter of smell. Many people find that the completesystems you purchase often work best to control smell and keep the worms in the most healthyenvironment. Depending on your intent for the wormery, it may be worth the investment to buy agood system that wont need to be replaced or upgraded over time.WORMERY BEDDINGThe area where your worm lives and works in is known as the “bedding.” Its called this because innature, the worms youll be dealing with live only in the top layers of the dirt – much more like theblankets on top of the earth than the deep soil underneath.Wormery bedding can be made of a number of substances: corrugated cardboard, black-inknewspaper, peat moss, wood chips, leaf matter, coir, or pre-packaged wormery bedding.Did You Know?Coir is a fiber that comes from the outside of a coconut. Although it can be difficult to collect yourown coir, it is fairly inexpensive to order online. Its a great way to “recycle” the waste that comesfrom manufacturing plants in the tropics that process coconuts for human consumption.No matter what material you use, it needs to be broken down and dampened. You can tear thecardboard or newspaper into small strips to get it ready. The bedding material should then bemoistened and wrung out until it resembles a damp sponge.Manure may also be used to supplement the bedding (though this isnt recommended if thewormery will be kept in or nearby the house!). Never use dog, cat, pig, or human droppings, sincethey can carry disease. Cow or horse manure works just fine, and can actually really help the wormsto thrive. Rodent droppings from pet rabbits or guinea pigs also work rather well.Wormery Tip:If youll be using manure to enrich your wormery, be prepared for other critters to call it home.Mites, centipedes, and grubs love manure, too, and theyll find a way in! Most organisms wontharm the wormery, but you should remove centipedes, since they might try to eat the babyworms and worm eggs. Copyright gardenwormeryguide.com – all rights reserved.
  10. 10. THE WORMERY ENVIRONMENTA wormery is also known as a home vermiculture system or a worm box. No matter what you call it,however, the idea remains the same – youre building a self-contained environment in which wormscan create rich soil out of your everyday kitchen waste.Despite what they may seem, wormeries are not completely self-contained ecosystems. Worms, likeany other creature or household pet, have to be taken care of properly and be regularly monitoredin order to survive. Although much of the work is done by the worms and nature, its your job to takeinto account issues of temperature, moisture, oxygen, light, and even pH.  TemperatureAlthough worms can survive in a variety of climates and temperatures, the ones most often found ina wormery thrive between 13 and 25 degrees Celsius (note: this means the temperature of the soil –not the air). Anything too warm or above 29 degrees Celsius could be fatal, and anything too cold orbelow 10 degrees might slow the worms down too much to make them effective. If you liveanywhere where outside temperatures are extreme, you may need to consider indoor placement foryour wormery.  MoistureWorms are notorious for coming out when it rains, coating the pavement and providing a buffet forbirds. Thats because worms breathe through their skin, and that skin must be moist in order forrespiration to occur effectively. The soil and bedding in your wormery has to maintain a high level ofmoisture in order to allow the worms to thrive – usually about 75 to 90 percent.Although the food and plant waste particles will provide some moisture, it may be necessary tomonitor levels to be sure the worms arent drying out. You can add water if the wormery gets toodry.  OxygenAs mentioned above, worms breathe through their skin. Other than that, however, their needs aresimilar to that of any other organism – they need adequate access to oxygen and a way for thecarbon dioxide they release to circulate. For a wormery to be effective over the long term, aircirculation must play a role in the construction.Air circulation plays another role, too. A wormery that doesnt get proper ventilation could quicklybecome a smelly system.  LightWorms are not fans of the light. In fact, if they get too much exposure, their bodies will dry out andthey could die. Thats why they live underground – and why you need to build a wormery that keepsout the light or that is kept in place where too much light wont get in the way. Copyright gardenwormeryguide.com – all rights reserved.
  11. 11.  pH LevelspH is what is used to measure the acidity or basicity of an organism. In humans, a good pH level isaround 7.4, and it is maintained almost entirely by the body. That means we have to do little tocontrol our own pH. Worms, however, are more sensitive to pH. They thrive best with a level of 7.0,although that number can vary by as much as 4.2 to 8.0.Although this is a fairly large range, food and plant matter can drastically alter the pH of yourwormery. For example, citrus fruits can drastically alter the pH to make it too acidic. You can test pHby using a pH meter for soil, which is typically available at most gardening stores.Wormery Tip:Ground up egg shells provide a quick and easy way to regulate the acidity in your wormery.WHAT WORMS TO USEThe types of worms you use in your wormery does matter – especially if you want to get the kind ofresults that have practical use in your garden. Thats because you need worms that not only feed onfood and plant matter in the soil, but ones that can survive the shallow dirt environment of thetypical backyard wormery.The recommended type of worm is a red worm, known as red wigglers or Eisenia foetida. Anothercommon worm is Lumbricus rubellus, which is very similar in makeup to the red wigglers.Nightcrawlers (Lumbricus terrestris), which are the types of worms most people associate withfishing or backyard worms, should not be used for wormeries. They prefer to live in deeper soil, andwont be able to thrive in the shallow bedding of your wormery.Unfortunately, finding the right worms isnt as easy as waiting for a rainy day and heading out to thesidewalk to see what you can scoop up; in most cases, youll need to specially order compostingworms. You can usually find them at mail-order companies, online vendors, and many fishing stores(which sell the worms as bait). If you have access to a nutrient-rich compost or manure pile, you canalso collect worms there, but there are no guarantees that youll find what youre looking for.Did You Know?Eisenia foetida gets its name from a foul-smelling liquid they emit when handled too roughly.Foetida is Latin for “fetid” or “stinky.”The cost of the worms will vary depending on where you purchase them. In most cases, youll buythem by weight. 500g of worms typically yields around 1,000 of the little critters, which can handleroughly 250g to 500g of kitchen waste per day. One of the greatest things about worms, though, istheir ability to reproduce, so you should be able to let the little guys procreate on their own to keepyour wormery well-stocked. Copyright gardenwormeryguide.com – all rights reserved.
  12. 12. Did You Know?Worms are hermaphroditic, which means they have both male and female sex organs. This makesreproduction easy, since every worm they come across is a potential mate. Baby worms hatchfrom eggs that are laid inside a cocoon – but only if the conditions in the wormery are just right.BUILDING YOUR WORMERYThere is no single method for building a wormery. As weve outlined before, all thats reallynecessary is the right combination of elements, and your worms should be able to thrive and do thework they do best. Whether you purchase a self-contained system to be stored under your sink oryou pull together a few supplies to build a wormery for your backyard, the results are almost alwaysthe same – as long as you are careful about maintaining your wormery.If youre building a wormery from scratch, however, there are a few important steps to follow. 1. Choose a container that works best for your family and your lifestyle. This can be anything from a plastic Tupperware container to an old wooden crate. Keep in mind that wood will eventually rot and may leak, so its not meant for indoor use. Make sure your container is clean and dry before you start. 2. Be sure to bore holes in the container for aeration, about 5 cm from the top and bottom. If you will be keeping this as a self-contained wormery (not buried in the ground), make sure the holes are too small for the worms to escape. Youll also need to bore a hole to create a spout in the bottom for drainage issues. You can either buy a small spigot with an on/off switch, or you can plug it with a cork and drain it manually. This drainage can later be used as its own type of fertilizer. 3. Your container should also have a lid or other cover (a piece of wood or burlap sack can work). This will be used to keep the moisture level correct and to keep larger critters from getting in.Wormery Tip:The bigger the container, the more worms you can have, and the greater the amount of kitchenwaste you can place in it. However, theres also more work and monitoring involved in a biggercontainer – especially since you cant let the wormery get too deep, or you risk not getting enoughoxygen to allow decomposition to occur properly. Never let your wormery get deeper than about60 cm. 4. The bottom of your wormery should be filled with a thin layer (8 to 10 cm) of sand or topsoil. Worms dont have teeth, which means that they need some sort of grinding material (found in the sand or topsoil) to help them digest. 5. The bedding comes next. Place a layer of your chosen type of pre-moistened bedding, leaving plenty of room for the kitchen scraps youll be adding over time. The bedding should never exceed 30 cm in depth. A damp piece of cardboard placed on top should keep the wormery moist while also keeping light away from the worms. Copyright gardenwormeryguide.com – all rights reserved.
  13. 13. 6. When youre placing the worms inside the wormery, put them on top of the bedding. Theres no need to worry – theyll make their way to the bottom as quickly as they can. After all, they prefer the dark, moist area underneath the bedding to the bright, hot air above. Any worms that do linger at the top are probably either dead or too sick to be a productive part of your wormery, so you should remove them, as needed. 7. As soon as you place the worms, you will place your kitchen scraps on top of the bedding, but below the damp cardboard.Your wormery is now ready to start working!Wormery Tip:One of the simplest ways to build a wormery in the backyard is to drill a garbage can with holes inthe side. If you bury it about half a meter in the ground, the worms can come and go as theyplease. As long as you dont fill it too full or forget to put the lid on tightly, you should be able tosimply toss the kitchen waste on top and occasionally add some bedding to keep the system going.Although this meas the worms are free to come and go, the kitchen waste should keep themcoming back for more! Break-Through Organic Gardening Secret Grows You Up To 10 Times The Plants, In Half The Time, With Healthier Plants, While the "Fish" Do All the Work... PLEASE CLICK HERE FOR MORE INFO Copyright gardenwormeryguide.com – all rights reserved.
  14. 14. Maintaining Your WormeryOne of the greatest things about a wormery is that it requires little work on your part. The one thingyou do have to provide regularly, however, is food.FEEDING THE WORMSThe worms in your wormery cant eat just anything. While most people use a wormery as analternative or as a complement to a compost pile, there are certain foods that do well and certainfoods that can harm the worms. In most cases, you can simply keep a bucket in your kitchen tocollect all the food scraps to take to the worms either daily or on a more reasonable schedule foryour lifestyle.Wormery Tip:Although you can feed your worms a little extra to get them through a few weeks if youre goingaway on vacation, its a good idea to plan for someone to come feed them if youll be gone longerthan 15 days.Things to feed the worms include:  Vegetables and peels  Potato peels (in moderation)  Citrus fruits (in moderation)  Non-citrus fruits  Coffee grounds  Tea bags  Egg shells  Bread/bread products  Rice  Pasta  Flowers  Cereal  Sugar  Human hair (in moderation)  Leaves  Grass clippings (in moderation)  Paper productsWormery Tip:Grinding your kitchen waste is time-consuming (and often a little gross), but it will speed up thedecomposition process.Foods to avoid include:  Meat products  Dairy products  Pet litter  Anything with bones Copyright gardenwormeryguide.com – all rights reserved.
  15. 15.  Garlic  Spicy foods  Anything with insecticides or pesticides  Salt  Oil  Soap or other cosmetics  WeedsAlthough small bits of dairy products (like cheese) wont hurt the worms, it tends to produce a muchstronger smell and may attract unwanted rodents into the wormery. Not only will that createcompetition for the worms food, but the rodents could also destroy the wormery. Also, if you usetea bags or paper waste from junk mail, be sure to remove non-organic structures like staples andthe plastic windows from envelopes. They dont break down, and it will be time-consuming to pickthem out of the vermicompost later.Wormery Tip:Dont be surprised if your worms have favorite foods. While they wont avoid the newest foodproducts in the wormery, they tend to prefer the wastes that have had a few days to be brokendown by the natural bacteria and fungi in the system.How you add the food to the wormery depends on your system. Some of the ready-made wormerieshave complex systems in which you can bury the kitchen waste in up to twenty different locations,which can help keep smells down and make it easier for you to care for the wormery. One of themost important things to remember, though, is that you cant put in more food waste than theworms can handle. If you pack the waste materials in there too tightly, there wont be enoughoxygen for the worms, and you could cause the entire system to come to a halt.Wormery Tip:If you find that your system has too much waste, simply let it rest for a few days. As long as yourworms are still healthy, they should be able to catch up.KEEPING THE WORMS HAPPYWorms make very self-sufficient pets. Unlike your resident dog or cat, they dont want to be handledor even watched very often. They prefer to be left alone in their dark, moist little containers, doingthe work they do best.Of course, that doesnt mean you can assume all is well. After all, its your job to monitor theirenvironment to make sure they have the right temperature, moisture level, and acidity to thrive.Most people find that a quick check during feeding time is all thats needed to keep things runningsmoothly.Wormery Tip:If youll be observing the worms for longer than a few minutes per day (for children or forscientific observation), its best to use a red light similar to those in dark rooms. You can place apiece of red plastic over a flashlight for quick and easy use. Copyright gardenwormeryguide.com – all rights reserved.
  16. 16. With all this eating, digesting, and breeding taking place, its only natural that some of your wormswill die, as well. The good news is that you rarely have to worry about dead worms. Because they aremade of so much water, they decompose quickly and might even add to the richness of thevermicompost.Did You Know?The worms used in wormeries can live for as long as four years, though most of them never reachtheir first birthday.If you are actually able to see worm carcasses, chances are there are too many dying too quickly.This could mean a problem with temperature, moisture, salt, or acidity in the wormery. Changingthe bedding and monitoring levels should help to keep worm deaths low.If you see mold, fungus, or other growths in your wormery, try not to worry. These things are anatural part of the decomposition process. However, maggots and flies can be damaging (anddisgusting!). If you have a buildup of these types of insects, you may need to replace or clean the lidand find a more ventilated outdoor space to store it.HARVESTING THE VERMICOMPOSTAlthough vermicompost is wonderful stuff for the garden, its not good for the worms. In fact, oneworms vermicompost is another worms poison! Its important to regularly harvest thevermicompost for your own use and to keep the worms healthy. Most wormeries will need to be“harvested” every three to six months.There are three primary ways of harvesting the vermicompost: dumping and sorting, wormeryrotation, or divide and dump.  Dumping and SortingThis method is messy, but it gets the job done. If you have a smaller wormery, you can simply emptyout the contents onto a table, gently scooping it into a cone shape. This will put the bedding at thebottom and all the rich vermicompost at the top. If you work in a well-lit area, the worms shouldnaturally burrow out of the vermicompost and down to the darker bedding. This allows you togather mounds of the vermicompost that is now free of worms. You can then gather up the wormsto be returned to the wormery along with fresh bedding.Wormery Tip:When harvesting the vermicompost, be sure to look for small green or yellow drops. These are the“cocoons” of worm eggs. They should be gently returned to the bedding – far from the light – andwith plenty of good food to eat to ensure they can hatch and provide more worms for yoursystem. These baby worms especially love apple cores and melon rinds.  Wormery RotationIn this method, you have to do less work, but it reduces the amount of space in your wormery byhalf. As soon as youve allowed your wormery to run for a few months, you can simply pusheverything to one side. Add fresh bedding to the empty side and start putting your food waste overthere. In a few more months, the worms should have abandoned the older vermicompost side and Copyright gardenwormeryguide.com – all rights reserved.
  17. 17. taken up in the fresh side. You can simply scoop up the vermicompost on the now abandoned sideand start all over again.  Divide and DumpThis method is less work overall, but more wasteful in terms of the worms. You can remove betweenhalf and two-thirds of the contents of the wormery and place them directly in your garden. Youll beremoving the nutrient-rich vermicompost as well as the worms, but the worms should be able to livein the garden and continue a small portion of their work.Those worms left behind should be offered new bedding. You can repopulate the wormery byadding more worms or by waiting for the existing ones to procreate. If you are waiting for them torepopulate themselves, however, remember that they wont be able to handle as much kitchenwaste until theyve had a few months to hatch and grow.When you harvest the vermicompost, its also time to replace the bedding. You should not reusebedding that is dark, too smelly, or unrecognizable from its original form.Wormery Tip:A well-maintained wormery should have little to no smell (if anything, it should just smell earthy).If your wormery smells like rotting food or ammonia, you may need to provide better oxygenationby stirring the contents, or you may need to reduce the amount of food waste you put in. Youshould also avoid meat or dairy products.How to Use VermicompostThe whole purpose of your wormery is to get vermicompost, that rich fertilizer considered by manyto the be the “black gold” of gardening. A small amount (about 60 ml) of vermicompost in oneplanting hole should make a considerable difference in plant health. You can also mix it in with theexisting topsoil of houseplants and in gardens once or twice a year to boost growth. It can be usedfor yards, rosebushes, and other landscaping growth, as well, though it does best when placed closeto the roots.Many people also choose to make “vermicompost tea” for use as a spray or liquid application. This isa watered down version of vermicompost, and it can be easily applied over large areas with asprayer. Companies sell compost tea makers, which can be used with vermicompost, or you canmake your own.In most cases, making tea means you simply “steep” the vermicompost in water for up to two weeksto yield a rich, liquid fertilizer. The traditional formula calls for a 3:9 ratio of vermicompost to waterkept at room temperature. It must be stirred at least once a day, and you may want to add approvedminerals or bubbling oxygen to enhance the richness of the tea. It is then sieved through a finescreen or cheesecloth and used as needed.No matter what you do with the vermicompost, however, you should be proud of yourself formaking such a difference in your life – and in your planet. By tapping into the power of the wormery,you are not only contributing to the environment in a positive way, but youre also creating a Copyright gardenwormeryguide.com – all rights reserved.
  18. 18. generation of responsible global citizens who understand the delicate balance between the food weeat and the animals and plants that make it all possible.This is the end of the Garden Wormery Guide. I hope you havefound it an interesting and informative read – and that you willderive plenty of fun, education savings from your adventures inworm land. Absolutely everything you need to know to grow healthy, fresh organic food, without all the problems. PLEASE CLICK HERE FOR MORE INFO Discover The Secrets To Building Your Own Solar and Wind Power Generators For Less Than You Think and Save 80% On Your Electric Bill PLEASE CLICK HERE FOR MORE INFO Copyright gardenwormeryguide.com – all rights reserved.

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