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Universal design for learning
Universal design for learning
Universal design for learning
Universal design for learning
Universal design for learning
Universal design for learning
Universal design for learning
Universal design for learning
Universal design for learning
Universal design for learning
Universal design for learning
Universal design for learning
Universal design for learning
Universal design for learning
Universal design for learning
Universal design for learning
Universal design for learning
Universal design for learning
Universal design for learning
Universal design for learning
Universal design for learning
Universal design for learning
Universal design for learning
Universal design for learning
Universal design for learning
Universal design for learning
Universal design for learning
Universal design for learning
Universal design for learning
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Universal design for learning

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  • Providing alternatives to everyday issues. Making things accessible to all. Closed captioning for the deaf or hard of hearing, large print for the visually impaired, wheelchair ramps and elevators for those with physical disabilities.
  • Let’s watch a short video on the Universal Design for Learning and the implications for the everyday classroom
  • The recognition networks also enables learners to recognize complex patterns, such as literary style or abstract concepts such as justice. Each individuals’ recognition networks is different, therefore the more ways in which a teacher presents information, the more likely that teacher is to reach all learners (Rose & Meyer, 2002).
  • The functions of the strategic networks are located primarily in the frontal lobes, enabling learners to plan, execute and monitor progress in virtually everything that is being done. These networks are so efficient that these processes take place without the learner being aware of the planning, organization, and monitoring of actions that are taking place.
  • There are many differences in the strategic networks of students, which can be demonstrated in variety of ways. Some students may experience difficulties in tasks such as spelling, reading, or writing, while another student may experience difficulties in areas such as multiplying, oral expression, or artistic expression. The more tools that students are allowed to use, and the more ways in which students are allowed and encouraged to demonstrate what they have learned, the more likely it is that they will be successful in achieving curriculum goals. By keeping these differences in mind, teachers will be able to plan strategic learning opportunities for all types of learners(Rose & Meyer, 2002).
  • The functions of the affective network occur in the core of the brain, allowing learners to become engaged and interested in learning. It also allows learners to evaluate patterns in content and assign emotional significance to them.
  • As many teachers know, the affective aspect of learning is perhaps the most important. Students’ emotional responses to learning can have a profound effect on their success. By getting to know students and paying attention to affective issues, teachers can help students to connect to the subject matter and enjoy learning (Rose & Meyer, 2002).
  • Technology and digital media have a central role in UDL. Traditional instruction has relied on speech and print text, creating a barrier for many students. Technology allows for teachers to create individualized, flexible instruction for all learners
  • CAST (The Center for Applied Special Technology), founded in 1984, is a nonprofit organization devoted to research and development to expand educational opportunities for all, especially those with disabilities, through Universal Design for Learning. Through their website, CAST offers a number of resources and tools to help teachers learn more about and implement UDL. (CAST.org) CAST has earned international recognition for its innovative contributions to educational products, classroom practices, and policies. Its staff includes specialists in education research and policy, neuropsychology, clinical/school psychology, technology, engineering, curriculum development, K-12 professional development, and more. (CAST.org)
  • This resource can help to ensure that when planning a lesson careful thought is given to the differences in our students and the help to ensure that they are being accounted for in the classroom
  • This resource provides a collection of ideas and further information for educators (and parents) to review in order to keep on top of the importance of UDL for our students
  • This resource provides a method for teachers to analyze their current practices and be able to then make adjustments as needed to provide a UDL learning experience for all students
  • Transcript

    • 1. Universal Design for Learning:
      A framework for access and equity
      Jamie Washington
      Walden University
      EDUC 7109
      Dr. Timothy Green
      October 16, 2011
    • 2. Universal Design: What is it?
    • 3.
    • 4. Inspiration for UDL
      “Consider the needs of the broadest possible range of users from the beginning.”
      – Ron Mace, architect.
    • 5. Inspiration for UDL
      “We can whenever and wherever we choose, successfully teach all children... we already know more than we need to know in order to do that.”
      Ron Edmonds, educator
    • 6. Principles of Universal Design
      Not a one size fits all approach
      Design includes accommodations in the beginning, not added on after design is complete
      Increase access opportunities for all
    • 7. Understanding UDL
    • 8. UDL and the 3 Neural Networks
    • 9. Recognition Network
      The functions of the recognition networks occur in the back of the brain enabling learners to identify and interpret patterns of light, sound, taste, smell, and touch. This network allows learners to be able to recognize faces, voices, letters, words, songs, etc.
    • 10. To reach children effectively in the recognition network you must use multiple ways of presenting information such as:
      The more ways in which information is presented, the more opportunities you have to reach all learners.Click the link to explore more ideas: http://differentiationcentral.com/resources.html
    • 14. Strategic Networks
      The functions of the strategic networks are located primarily in the frontal lobes, enabling learners to plan, execute and monitor progress in virtually everything that is being done. These networks are so efficient that these processes take place without the learner being aware of the planning, organization, and monitoring of actions that are taking place.
    • 15. To reach children effectively in the strategic network you must allow students choice and flexibility to demonstrate what they have learned. Ways to do this include:
      Click the link to explore more ideas: http://differentiationcentral.com/resources.html
    • 22. Affective Networks
      The functions of the affective network occur in the core of the brain, allowing learners to become engaged and interested in learning. It also allows learners to evaluate patterns in content and assign emotional significance to them.
    • 23. To reach children effectively in the affective network you must provide multiple, flexible methods of engagement based on their learning styles, interests, and motivation levels. Some ways to do this include:
      • Offering choices of content and tools based on students’ interests.
      • 24. Providing varying levels of challenge so all students are working at their appropriately challenging skill level.
      • 25. Offer various rewards for meeting learning goals based on students interest
      • 26. Offer choice in the structure of assignments (independent or collaborative.
    • Technology and UDL
      Technology and digital media have a central role in UDL.
    • 27. Technology and UDL
      Traditional instruction has relied on speech and print text, creating a barrier for many students. Technology allows for teachers to create individualized, flexible instruction for all learners
    • 28. Who benefits from UDL
      All Learners!
      “From pre-kindergarten to graduate school, classrooms usually include learners with diverse abilities and backgrounds, including students with physical, sensory, and learning disabilities, differing cultural and linguistic backgrounds, varied preferences and motivations for learning, students who are unusually gifted, and many others… A universally designed curriculum is designed from the outset to meet the needs of the greatest number of users, making costly, time-consuming, and after-the-fact changes to curriculum unnecessary” (http://www.cast.org/udl/faq/index.html).
    • 29. Who benefits from UDL
      EBD
      ADD
      ADHD
      Gifted
      English Language Learners
      SLD
      Culturally diverse learners
      Universal Design for Learning is a benefit to all learners
    • 30. Why UDL?
      “UDL provides a blueprint for creating instructional goals, methods, materials, and assessments that work for everyone--not a single, one-size-fits-all solution but rather flexible approaches that can be customized and adjusted for individual needs” (CAST.org).
    • 31. Principle One: Multiple Means of Representation
      Powerpoint
      Podcasts
      iPads
      eBooks
      Oral lectures
      Interactive White Boards
      Interactive tables
      Kindergarten students using a Smart interactive table.
      Westbury Schools. (March17, 2011)
      http://www.westburyschools.org/page.aspx?name=news&newsid=54
    • 32. Principle Two:Multiple Means of Action and Expression
      Wikis
      Blogs
      www.glogster.com
      iMovies
      Microsoft Photo story
      Sample glogster
      Minnesota State University. (2006) Glogster Tutorial. http://appserv.mnstate.edu/instrtech/its/main.php?id=1&menu=1&show=web20&page=tut4
    • 33. Principle Three:Multiple Means of Engagement
      Online Collaboration
      Skype
      Google Docs
      Webquests
      Virtual Field trips
      Students skyping with native American students in a neighboring city.
      Stratford Community School District. www.stratford.k12.ia.us/mainpage.htm
    • 34. Technology and Student Learning
      Digital media offers many benefits
      • Versatility: Material can be presented in multiple formats, i.e. pictures, audio, text, video or a combination of some or all. Students can then access information in their preferred medium.
      • 35. Transformation: Students can access the same content in a variety of ways, with larger text size, higher volume, adjusting the contrast on video, and content can be translated into a students primary language.
      • 36. Networkability: Teachers can link content to other digital media and give students access to other digital tools such as thesauruses, dictionaries, videos, or glogsters.
    • CAST
      CAST (The Center for Applied Special Technology), founded in 1984, is a nonprofit organization devoted to research and development to expand educational opportunities for all, especially those with disabilities, through Universal Design for Learning. Through their website, CAST offers a number of resources and tools to help teachers learn more about and implement UDL. (CAST.org)
      CAST has earned international recognition for its innovative contributions to educational products, classroom practices, and policies. Its staff includes specialists in education research and policy, neuropsychology, clinical/school psychology, technology, engineering, curriculum development, K-12 professional development, and more. (CAST.org)
    • 37. CAST Tools
      CAST UDL lesson plan archives (http://lessonbuilder.cast.org/explore.php)
    • 38. CAST Tools
      CAST Ideas and Information (http://www.cast.org/teachingeverystudent/ideas/)
    • 39. CAST Tools
      AST Classroom profile (http://www.cast.org/teachingeverystudent/tools/classprofile.cfm)
    • 40. UDL links
      View tools, resources and sample lessons for implementing UDL in the language arts classroom: https://sites.google.com/site/udllanguagearts/useful-links
      Use the Class Profile Maker to better understand and reach your students: http://www.cast.org/teachingeverystudent/tools/classprofile.cfm
      A website for science teachers on how to enhance access to the general curriculum for students with disabilities: http://www.k8accesscenter.org/index.php
      View sample UDL lesson plans in all subject areas: http://macombschools.org/UDL-E3T/index.cfm
      Visit the CAST website for UDL information, resources and tools: http://cast.org/
      For more information on brain research and UDL , read Teaching Every Student in the Digital Age: Universal Design for Learning: http://www.cast.org/teachingeverystudent/ideas/tes/
    • 41. References
      Rose, D., & Meyer, A. (2002). Teaching every student in the digital age: Universal design for learning. Retrieved from http://www.cast.org/teachingeverystudent/ideas/tes/

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