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Passively Cooled Data Centers (Weec 2009)
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Passively Cooled Data Centers (Weec 2009)

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Presented to the World Energy Engineering Conference on November 5th, 2009.

Presented to the World Energy Engineering Conference on November 5th, 2009.

Published in: Technology, Business

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  • Transcript

    • 1. Passively Cooled Data Centers
      Jamil Scott
    • 2. Data Center
      Data Center
      Key Cause & Effect RelationshipsData Center
      Data Processing
      Profits
      Energy Consumption
    • 3. Key Cause & Effect RelationshipsData Center (Beneficial Effects Only)
      Electricity
      Power Supply
      Ease of Manufacturing
      Lower Cost Servers
      Processor Power
      Processors
      Data Processing
      Data
      Profits
    • 4. Key Cause & Effect RelationshipsData Center (With Harmful Effects)
      Electricity
      Power Supply
      Ease of Manufacturing
      Lower Cost Servers
      Close Proximity
      Processor Power
      Excessive Heat Near Processors
      Processor Damage
      Processors
      Data Processing
      Excessive Heat In Processors
      Data
      Profits
    • 5. Key Cause & Effect RelationshipsData Center (With Harmful Effects & Counteractions)
      Electricity
      Power Supply
      Ease of Manufacturing
      Lower Cost Servers
      Close Proximity
      Processor Power
      Excessive Heat Near Processors
      Processor Damage
      Processors
      Data Processing
      Excessive Heat In Processors
      Cooling
      Cooled Air
      Data
      Low Density Cooling
      Profits
      Electricity Consumption For Cooling
      HVAC
    • 6. Ease of Manufacturing
      Power Supply
      Key Cause & Effect RelationshipsData Center (Full System View)
      Electricity
      Lower Cost Servers
      Close Proximity
      Power Supply
      Ease of Manufacturing
      Processor Power
      Excessive Heat Near Processors
      Processor Damage
      Data Processing
      Processors
      Excessive Heat In Processors
      Data Processing
      Cooling
      Cooled Air
      Cooling
      Cooled Air
      Data
      Low Density Cooling
      Profits
      Electricity Consumption For Cooling
      HVAC
    • 7. Cooling Mechanism
      Cooling is provided to counteract excessive heat, but requires consumption of electricity
      Current cooling methods rely on cool air for cooling. Air is significantly less dense than processor materials. The disparity between materials makes air cooling relatively inefficient.
      Form Factor
      Power supplies are placed in close proximity to processors to provide ease of manufacturing & installation
      Power supplies generate (and can operate in conditions of) heat in excess of processor limits
      Processor Construction
      Current processor construction allows the processor to generate sufficient heat to damage itself.
      Key System Contradictions
      Page 7
    • 8. Find an alternative way to obtain: Cooling that offers the following:
      Eliminates, reduces, or prevents High Heat Near Processors and Excess Heat in Processors
      Does not cause Additional Electricity Consumption
      Does not require HVAC and Air
      Is not influenced by Low Density Cooling.
      Proposed Resolutions
      Eliminate HVAC
      Use a dense cooling material (water, oil, etc..)
      Use a dense thermal transfer material (metal, concrete, etc…)
      Use conduction to move heat away from processor boards
      Then forced convection with flows other than air
      Find a beneficial use for the excess heat
      Power generation power via sterling engine
      Key System Contradictions(Cooling Mechanism)
      Page 8
    • 9. Find an alternative way to provide Processor Power without causing High Heat Near Processors.
      Proposed Resolution
      Separate the power supply from the processor boards
      Provide power through a standardized power bus
      Provide data through a standardized data bus
      Find a way to eliminate Rack-based Server.
      Proposed Resolution
      Redesign processor boards for:
      Flush mounting against processor surface
      Machine (e.g. robot) handling
      Standardize power and data connections for machine handling
      Make the data center the ‘rack’
      Use the thermal transfer structure to provide the mounting surface
      Minimize space between walls to provide dense processing capacity
      Key System Contradictions(Form Factor)
      Page 9
    • 10. Convection Concept
      Page 10
    • 11. What changes will be required?
      Redesign Processor boards
      Standardize power connections
      Standardize data connections
      Design machine-based board management system
      Re-engineer data centers
      Redesign spaces to provide optimum environment for processing components, not humans
      Data Center becomes the server
      Walls become the rack and heat transfer mechanism
      Reuse waste heat
      Making Passive Cooling a Reality
      Page 11
    • 12. Current Processor Board Design
      Page 12
    • 13. Ease of Manufacturing
      Power Supply
      Key Cause & Effect Relationships(Revisiting the Full System View)
      Ease of Manufacturing
      Power Supplyb
      Electricity
      Close Proximity
      Lower Cost Servers
      Close Proximity
      Power Supply
      Ease of Manufacturing
      Processor Power
      Excessive Heat Near Processors
      Processor Damage
      Data Processing
      Processors
      Excessive Heat In Processors
      Data Processing
      Passive Cooling
      Cooling
      Cooled Air
      Data
      Low Density Cooling
      Profits
      Electricity Consumption For Cooling
      HVAC
    • 14. Key Cause & Effect Relationships(Improved Ideality)
      Electricity
      Power Supply
      Lower Cost Servers
      Close Proximity
      Ease of Manufacturing
      Processor Power
      Processor Damage
      Processors
      Data Processing
      Excessive Heat In Processors
      Passive Cooling
      Data
      Profits
    • 15. Separating the power supply from the processors allows each to operate in their own optimized environment
      Flush mounting the processor boards allows natural convection to remove excess heat without electricity consumption
      Redesigning processor boards for flush mounting & machine handling allows re-thinking board design
      High speed inter-board communications (optics, etc…)
      Redesigning processor boards allows re-thinking of data center architecture
      Data Center is the server
      Significant increase in processor density in proportion to floor space
      Dynamic reallocation of processing capacity
      Enhanced security by optimizing the environment for systems rather than people
      Very tight tolerances between boards
      Elimination of air (to reduce thermal radiation)
      Reuse thermal energy
      Benefits
      Page 15
    • 16. Rethinking data center, processor, and server designs will open up a new and exciting period in information processing.
      Meeting the processing needs of the future requires new thinking
      Future data centers must be designed to host processors, not people.
      Future processors must use less energy and produce less heat
      Processing components must operate in optimized environments
      Conclusion
      Page 16
    • 17. Jamil Scott
      Principal Information Systems Engineer
      jamil@mitre.org
      (703) 983-5709
      Dr. Thomas J. Heiman
      Senior Information Systems Engineer
      theiman@mitre.org
      (703) 983-2951
      Team Members
      Page 17
    • 18. Questions
      Page 18

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