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OSUE Back to the Kitchen Presentation

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Back to the Kitchen: planning, implementation, and impact of a Family & Consumer Sciences social media campaign during National Childhood Obesity Awareness Month.

Back to the Kitchen: planning, implementation, and impact of a Family & Consumer Sciences social media campaign during National Childhood Obesity Awareness Month.

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  • Give some background of the campaignWanted to get into social media…. Had a lot of Educators saying they needed that “push” to make them try and/or do it on a regular basisWorked with family mealtime data as part of a secondary data paper and became very interested in itSaw the need for both sharing the family mealtime information and utilizing social media to do it ----- National Childhood Obesity Awareness MonthPass around BTK bookmark and SM business card
  • If we were going to put this campaign together, we had to do it RIGHT. I did an exhaustive review of family meal-time and nutrition-related literature to find the most pertinent and credible information, tools, and resources to post during the campaign.I have hard copies of all of these components available with me if you’re interested in taking a closer look after the session.
  • Wanted to develop a “hand’s-on” opportunity to actively learn how to best utilize social media as an educational tool. Drew off of experiences with blogging with FCS Educators in Top of Ohio EERA.
  • I made this promo video for the campaign in just one afternoon. It was posted on YouTube on our OSU Extension YouTube channel and really created a lot of excitement about the campaign.
  • One thing I loved about the campaign was that FCS professionals from various titles came together and were all interested in participating.Numbers drastically increased after the promo video was shared (however it was also the final 10 days before the sign-up deadline to participate…. We always wait until the last minute in Extension!)Can anyone guess why the number of participants dwindled immediately before the campaign started?CommTech informed me they needed account log-in information from everyone in order to track impact and engagement data.
  • One thing I loved about the campaign was that FCS professionals from various titles came together and were all interested in participating.Numbers drastically increased after the promo video was shared / had 37 FCS professionals sign up initially to participate(however it was also the final 10 days before the sign-up deadline to participate…. We always wait until the last minute in Extension!)Can anyone guess why the number of participants dwindled immediately before the campaign started?CommTech informed me they needed account log-in information from everyone in order to track impact and engagement data.
  • Training:Social Media ToolkitVirtual Training (also recorded)
  • Quickly go through survey response slides!!!! Explain the virtual training (WebEx and was recorded)
  • Social media toolkit included step-by-step information on how to create a Facebook and/or Twitter account and how to create and efficiently utilize a Facebook business “Fan” page. It includes materials from the Ohio Farm Bureau, Mashable, and other expert sources.It also included information on how and why or why not to use both personal and professional accounts and pagesIt also included information on how and when to post to get the most engagement from followers.
  • Take note of the last comment because I think this is where we tend to hit a “wall” in regard to social media use by Extension professionals. The point of this campaign is to go where audiences already are…. They are online 24/7. If we’re going to reach them in this venue…. Then we need to be online 24/7 too. That doesn’t mean that we need to be responding to a comment on our page at 3:00am, but it does mean that if we’re going to get the most engagement from a Facebook post at 6:30pm on a weeknight or 11:00am on a Sunday, that we are there in that space posting.We are seeing more and more the “meshing” of work vs personal time. Many of our new Extension hires will not see an issue with posting things online outside of “work days”. It’s second nature to them to be online all the time already. This is where we are seeing generations clash in Extension and I’m not sure if it will resolve itself until we have a turn-over in baby boomer professionals vs. Gen X’ers and Millenials.
  • - I found the personal and professional Facebook stats to be interesting…. How do you have a professional fan page without first having a personal account?
  • Keep in mind this is pre-campaign responseIt will be interesting to see what the post-campaign survey results show
  • - I feel this is very important to note in an age where personal & professional are blending at increasingly faster rates. To have an impact online with in our professional field we have to get personal. How can we accomplish this by steadfastly keeping them separate??????
  • - The other goal of the campaign was to serve as positive professional development opportunity for FCS professionals
  • Comments from FCS professionals who had actively participated in the campaign (just through conversation).From the pre-campaign survey: “Personal time to do this project because I’m not getting it done during my work day.”I witnessed some FCS professionals adjust over time to how they could get the most engagement from their online audience --- saw what people were responding to.
  • - N = - This is a huge success in my view!
  • - I found from conversations with participants and post-campaign survey responses that the campaign was an opportunity for many FCS professionals who were waiting to get involved with social media to make that leap and get started!
  • Pre-Campaign survey = 18% (agree & somewhat agree) / post-campaign survey = 34%
  • - 28% agree or somewhat agree that they felt more engaged with their online audience because of participating in the campaign
  • Decrease in personal Facebook page useSubstantial increase in professional Facebook page useSlight increase in overall Twitter useSubstantial increase in Pinterest use (up from 4%)
  • I feel this is very important to note in an age where personal & professional are blending at increasingly faster rates. To have an impact online with in our professional field we have to get personal. How can we accomplish this by steadfastly keeping them separate??????This increased from 71% in the pre-campaign survey.
  • -Summarize each comment and quickly go through
  • -I observed that those who had not been actively utilizing social media (had to start from scratch) found the preparation for the campaign to be a bit overwhelming
  • - Campaign was an excellent way to look up the research, organize it and prep to post ---- basically an easier way to organize credible information so Educator’s can share via online outlets such as social media
  • -Quickly summarize- Left them wanting more…. Wanting to know what the “next steps” or the next project are/is.
  • Some Impact & Engagement Data to Share with you:By 9/11 we increased our reach by over 200%. We went from reaching around 500 people each day to reaching over 8,500 people.That sounds impressive, but the true statistic that I was interested in was our engagement with followers. That also increased dramatically.
  • The “engaged users” and “talking about this” are the key stats to look at here. - While we still had a few posts with a small number of engaged followers, we saw a significant increase in engagement on average (point out popular posts)
  • A graphic example of the increase in engagement just in the first week.
  • - We had the most engagement with “visuals” like photos or infographics and interactive questions and polls. Here’s a few examples….Posted on a Wednesday around 6:30pmEngagement: 30 Likes 17 Shares 11 Comments
  • Posted on a Tuesday around 6:30pmEngagement: 57 Likes 30 Shares ------ the “Holy Grail” 10 Comments
  • Posted on the first day of the campaign, September 1stEngagement: 34 Likes 13 Shares 1 Comment
  • Posted on a Friday around 9:30amEngagement: 149 Likes 53 Shares 17 Comments
  • Note that Central Arizona Animal Rescue got a hold of the photo ---- I still have no idea how it reached them…. But then it went on from there and got even more shares.
  • We also received a lot of engagement from posts that were “fill-in-the-blank” questions.
  • Reach and engagement began to decline after mid-September.By Sept. 28th, our reach had decreased to 1,467.Several factors could have contributed to this (NEAFCS, loss of momentum, loss of interest, etc).
  • I gauged the impact of this campaign with online clientele by assessing the reach and “engagement” of campaign posts. It’s very difficult to gauge behavior change when sharing educational information via social media tools.
  • 11 of the 31 Actively participating FCS professionals submitted Facebook Fan Page Insight Data for inclusion to gauge reach, engagement and impact of the campaignLow number due to participants having to pull data/spreadsheets themselves and forward to meNot a good response rate, hard to extrapolate to rest of participatns/pages, but gives us an idea of the reach the campaign had and what the average engagement with online followers looked likeOf the 11 submitted, 8 pages contained information in a usable format (data including on next slides represent just over 25% of participant data)
  • Reach & Page impressions are counted any time your posts and/or Fan page name shows up in someone’s newsfeed or “ticker” (show where both are)Also includes those who actually go to your page and engage with your posts
  • Total from all pagesLarge majority of reach was between Sept. 1 – 15. End of the month declined but was slightly higher than before the campaign began.
  • Total from all pages (remember, only representing a little over a quarter of active FCS pages participating. So while we can’t extrapolate this number automatically, we can assume there is at least another 100,000 from the other 23 pages that were reached.)
  • Reach demographics by gender for the length of the campaign (Sept 1st – Oct 1st)Female = 60,157Male = 22,225
  • Reach demographics by gender broken down further into age groups / for the length of the campaign (Sept 1st – Oct 1st)Majority: Females between the ages of 25-34 & 35-44Males between the ages of 25-34 (could mean a potentially new group of clientele! – At least in an online space)
  • Although the data has not yet been summarized, general observation leads me to believe the vast majority of those reached during the campaign were Ohio residentsReached literally every state, and internationally – basically every corner of the globe!
  • Engagement is defined by the S.O.C.I.A.L. Framework as: any time someone (whether they “like” your page or not) “likes”, “Shares”, or “Comments” on your postsThis graph compares the average engagement of all pages combined, the FCS Page, and another fan page that was established well before the campaign began and had over 550 “likes” before Sept. 1st. (Compare to FCS page which had more than 200 fewer “likes” but engaged many more people on Facebook. A possible explanation for this may have been that many pages were “sharing” posts from the general FCS page.)
  • - Groundwork: the pages / participants who experienced the most engagement with their posts already had a good-sized base of followers and “likes” on their page before the campaign started. Others felt as though they were playing “catch up” with everyone else…. But quickly gained enough of a following to get their base established by the end of the campaign.Promotion: Know who key online influencers are that can help spread the word. We tapped into various colleges at OSU that were online (CFAES, EHE, as well as the overall Ohio State University Facebook and Twitter accounts, etc.)- Know your audience: we now know that those interested in the campaign were between ages of 25-34 and 35-44…. How are we going to continue to engage them online?don’t take yourself too seriously (ellie fund – serious topic but light-hearted and inspirational posts)Mind the calendar ---- September was a very busy month for our FCS professionals. Maybe choosing a slower month would be beneficial (but sometimes really hard to NOT find a busy month in an Extension calendar!!!)
  • - OSU Extension has been inspired to possibly develop three campaigns each year related to each of the 3 “healthies” in FCS programming (Healthy Relationships, Healthy Finances, and Healthy People)
  • Scan the QR code on the screen to go to the presentation on Slideshare.comOtherwise, search for me on slideshare.com or e-mail me for a PDF version

Transcript

  • 1. BACK TO THE KITCHENPLANNING, IMPLEMENTATION, AND IMPACT OF AN FCS SOCIAL MEDIA CAMPAIGN DURING NATIONAL CHILDHOOD OBESITY AWARENESS MONTH OSUE Annual Conference Columbus, Ohio December 5 th , 2012 Jamie Seger Fami ly & Consu mer Sci ences Pro gram C o o rdi nat o r Ohi o State Uni versi ty Ext ens i o n
  • 2. Campaign Components• Literature Review• Social Media Toolkit• Campaign Timeline• Posting Schedule (Calendar)• Evaluation Plan• Marketing/Recruitment E-Mails & Materials to FCS Professionals• Campaign Promo YouTube Video• Press Release• Basecamp Project Site• Facebook Group Page
  • 3. Campaign Objectives• 1. Increase the online impact and publicity Ohio State University Extension has with the general public while providing them with information on a timely subject (family mealtime).• 2. To serve as a professional development opportunity for OSU Extension FCS program staff who were interested in learning more about utilizing social media as a program tool or taking their existing knowledge of social media to the next level.
  • 4. Info Shared During Campaign • Tips on how to increase how often they cook & eat meals at home together as a family • Suggestions on how to get their children involved & helping to cook in the kitchen • Apps for healthy living, to get kids & parents excited about cooking • Easy, healthy recipes via Pinterest • Easy ways of cooking dinner (crock pot, freezer cooking) • Portion control & MyPlate guidelines • Tips on how to increase fruit & veggie consumption
  • 5. Participation • 31 OSUE Family & Consumer Sciences Professionals • Educators • Program Assistants • Program Coordinators • Field Specialists • District Specialist• Initial response dwindled in final week before campaign
  • 6. Priorities• Training• User-friendly for FCS professionals• Professional Development• Gauging Engagement, Not “Reach”• Keeping Momentum• Evaluation & Impact Data
  • 7. PRE-CAMPAIGNPARTICIPANT SURVEYRESULTS
  • 8. Participant (FCS Professionals)Pre-Campaign Survey Virtual Training was Helpful 4% 12% 42% Somewhat Disagree Neutral Somewhat Agree Agree 42%
  • 9. Participant (FCS Professionals)Pre-Campaign Survey Social Media Toolkit was Helpful 12% 12% Somewhat Disagree Neutral Somewhat Agree 55% Agree 21%
  • 10. Participant (FCS Professionals)Pre-Campaign Survey Basecamp Project Site & Discussion Boards were Helpful 4% 4% Somewhat Disagree Neutral 38% Somewhat Agree 54% Agree
  • 11. Participant (FCS Professionals)Pre-Campaign Survey• What other information and/or tools would have been helpful to prepare you for the campaign? • “The timing has been off for me to participate in the campaign. Although I want to participate I haven’t had time to do it.” • “It would be helpful to know more about RSS feeds.” • “I just need more time.  It is much needed outreach.” • “Very basic ‘how-to’s’ such as how to get the word out to email lists and personal Facebook page. Social Media is an area I haven’t used much but want to use it more and do it right!” • “Personal Coach” • “Personal time to do this project because I’m not getting it done during my work day.”
  • 12. Participant (FCS Professionals)Pre-Campaign Survey Felt Confident about Using Social Media to Deliver FCS- Related Educational Information 0% 4% 25% 17% Disagree Somewhat Disagree Neutral Somewhat Agree Agree 54%
  • 13. Participant (FCS Professionals)Pre-Campaign Survey Social Media Accounts Actively Used 83% 88% 90% 80% 70% 60% 50% 40% 30% 20% 17% 10% 12% 0% 4% Accounts
  • 14. Participant (FCS Professionals)Pre-Campaign Survey Felt as Though They were Engaged with Online Clientele Via Social Media Accounts 9% 9% 9% 18% Disagree Somewhat Disagree Neutral Somewhat Agree Agree 55%
  • 15. Participant (FCS Professionals)Pre-Campaign Survey Feel it is Important to Have Separate Personal & Professional Social Media Accounts 0% 4% 4% 21% Disagree Somewhat Disagree Neutral Somewhat Agree Agree 71%
  • 16. POST-CAMPAIGNPARTICIPANT SURVEYRESULTS
  • 17. Impact on FCS Professionals• Comments: • "I have had so much fun - I dont even mind posting something at 10pm some nights." • "The campaign was what I really needed to get me online and doing something." • "Ive learned a lot about how to word my posts to get the most engagement." • "Its been great to see the different ways others are posting the same information, and Ive learned a lot from watching how other people word their posts, or if they post a picture vs. a statement."
  • 18. Participant (FCS Professionals)Post-Campaign Survey After participating in the campaign, do you feel more confident using social media tools as a part of your programming efforts? 5% 5% 9% 33% Disagree Somewhat Disagree Neutral Somewhat Agree Agree 48%
  • 19. Participant (FCS Professionals)Post-Campaign Survey Do you find yourself utilizing social media tools as a part of programming more so than you had before participating in the campaign? 0% 14% 10% Disagree 24% Somewhat Disagree Neutral Somewhat Agree Agree 52%
  • 20. Participant (FCS Professionals)Post-Campaign Survey Did you feel engaged with your online audience during the campaign? 0% 5% 33% Disagree 29% Somewhat Disagree Neutral Somewhat Agree Agree 33%
  • 21. Participant (FCS Professionals)Post-Campaign Survey Do you feel as though you are now more engaged with your online audience? 0% 14% 20% Disagree 14% Somewhat Disagree Neutral Somewhat Agree Agree 52%
  • 22. Participant (FCS Professionals)Post-Campaign Survey Social Media Accounts Actively Used – Post Campaign 100% 91% 90% 76% 80% 70% 60% 50% 40% 30% 19% 20% 24% 10% 14% 0% Accounts
  • 23. Participant (FCS Professionals)Post-Campaign Survey Feel it is Important to Have Separate Personal & Professional Social Media Accounts – Post Campaign 5% 5% 5% Disagree 9% Somewhat Disagree Neutral Somewhat Agree Agree 76%
  • 24. Participant (FCS Professionals)Post-Campaign Survey - Comments• Had the most comments about the post on using what you had on hand. Three people shared what they were making for dinner and I even got an invitation to their home for supper!• A follower who is a personal friend (and mother and college professor at Bowling Green) commented that her son loved the Smash Your Food iPad App. She said she intends to use this in her classroom when teaching college-level nutrition classes. She said, "I am trying to integrate more technology in the classroom."
  • 25. Post-Campaign Survey –What did you enjoy least aboutparticipating in the campaign?• Somewhat overwhelming with messages from Basecamp, even though other Educators asked questions that helped me. Also, it was confusing as to how to keep my personal and professional Facebook page separate.• I found it challenging to motivate and encourage some of my staff to continue to participate.• It was just A LOT of keeping up with. I often forgot to post on the weekends.
  • 26. Post-Campaign Survey –What did you enjoy most aboutparticipating in the campaign?• There is SO much information from which consumers/families can benefit and I wish they would take the time to sort out the credible information (which you/we provided) and all of the myths from other sources. I think the program helped promote FCS in my urban area and let them know what we are all about. I really enjoy sharing valid research with families and think this was a good way to do it. The mistakes of low numbers, lack of followers - was on our end and getting our County FCS facebook page up to speed. Now we have it, though.• I got to be creative and share fun, high-interest material to communicate an educational message. I felt as though using social media made it more relaxed and enjoyable for participants and campaign followers than if it were more formal and printed literature-based.
  • 27. Post-Campaign Survey –Other Comments• I think it is just the beginning of a new opportunity for reaching others that we may not have the chance to in our day-to-day hectic lives. Even though my participants werent totally engaged, I think it opened the door. Thank you for a very professional, comprehensive and "cool tool" to stimulate and educate those of us who have been with Extension a few years.• Keep on pushing me!• Thank you! I hope we are able to do this again next year. It would be neat if we could incorporate an in-person activity into this. Perhaps we could have an in-person class at the beginning of the month and then those participants might be more engaged with the social media portion after attending the class. For example, the class could focus on cooking strategies for busy families, conversation starters for dinner, meal ideas.• Thanks for the help and direction. Whats next?
  • 28. OSUE FCS Facebook Fan PageFACEBOOK DATA &ENGAGEMENTEXAMPLES
  • 29. “We know that youre busy. Betweenwork, shuttling kids from school to soccerpractice, and chasing after on-the-gotoddlers you may feel as though cookinga family meal most nights is nearlyimpossible. But did you know thatfrequent family meals that are cookedand eaten at home with your loved oneshave been shown to increase goodrelationships, a healthy diet, and lowerobesity risk? This is especially true for kidswho are in the third grade or lower.Cooking and eating family meals at homeare worth it... so keep calm and cook on.Well help show you how this monthduring Back to the Kitchen!”
  • 30. Overall ImpactFACEBOOK REACHAND ENGAGEMENTDATA
  • 31. Participant Facebook Insight Data• Received data from 11 Facebook Fan Pages (35%)• 8 were usable
  • 32. Participant Facebook Insight Data• Reach & Page Impressions
  • 33. Participant Facebook Insight Data• Reach for all pages Total Daily Page Impressions 100,000 90,000 80,000 86,745 70,000 60,000 50,000 40,000 30,000 34,846 20,000 23,353 10,000 0 Aug. 20-31 Sept 1-15 Sept 16-Oct 1
  • 34. Participant Facebook Insight Data• Total campaign reach from 8 Facebook pages reporting (September 1st – October 1st) 121,594
  • 35. Participant Facebook Insight Data• Reach demographics Gender Male 27% Female 73%
  • 36. Participant Facebook Insight Data• Reach demographics Gender & Age Group Age 13-17 Age 18-24 Age 25-34 Age 35-44 Age 45-54 Age 55-64 Age 65+ 0 5000 10000 15000 20000 25000 Female Male
  • 37. Participant Facebook Insight Data• Reach location demographics:• Ohio• United States• International (sample from one page)• Canada • Mexico • India • Sweden• South Korea • Malaysia • Australia • Turkey• Romania • South Africa • Belgium • Israel• Kenya • Jamaica • China • Greece• France • Argentina • Egypt • Tanzania
  • 38. Participant Facebook Insight Data Average # of Engaged Facebook Users Page Comparison 80 70 60Average Engaged Users 50 All Pages 40 FCS Page 30 Other Established County Page 20 10 0 August Sept 1-10 Sept 11-20 Sept 21-30
  • 39. Key Take-Aways• Lay groundwork with followers ahead of campaign• Promotion is Critical• Know your audience• Don’t take yourself too seriously… have fun! • And….. Here’s a picture of a cat!• Mind the calendar & clock • Key times to post days/times• Post often and frequently• Be visual and interactive • Photos & Fill-in-Blank questions get the most engagement• Shorten Length of Campaigns
  • 40. Future Plans…• Gauge actual behavior change with online followers (Simple Suppers)• Future post-campaign surveys for BTK participants (6 months & 1 year)• Future FCS Campaigns
  • 41. Questions? seger.23@osu.edu www.slideshare.com