Managing Generations in the Workplace

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  • Word association game. What words come to mind when you see this? (expect fear, bad, fight, death, problem, etc.). Suggestions: growth, development, necessary, learning, change, evolution,

Transcript

  • 1. Managing Generational Diversity Management Training Blue Cross Blue Shield of Florida by Jamie Notter Vice President, Organizational Effectiveness
  • 2. Objectives
    • Cut through the hype around generational differences
    • Think critically about how to apply knowledge about generational differences to the workplace
    • Learn skills for communicating and managing conflict that can be applied directly to a multi-generational workforce.
  • 3. Today
    • Introductions and background
    • Understanding Generations
      • Cutting Through the Hype
      • Theory
      • 4 Generations in today’s workforce
    • So What? Applying Generational Knowledge
    • Better Conversations: Managing (Generational) Conflict
    • Next Steps: What will You Do Differently?
  • 4. Schedule
    • Start (1:00pm)
    • Work
    • Break
    • Work some more
    • Finish (4:00pm)
  • 5. Generational Diversity in the Workplace: Hype Won’t Get You Results Hype Won’t Get You Results Silent Generation Baby Boomers Generation X Millennials
  • 6.  
  • 7.  
  • 8.  
  • 9. ?
  • 10. generational diversity hype? knowledge?
  • 11. silent generation baby boomers generation x millennial generation 1925-42 (68–85) 1943-60 (50–67) 1961-81 (29–49) 1982-2005 (5–28)
  • 12.
    • can’t handle change
    • can’t think outside the box
    • overly reliant on hierarchy
    • too cautious; won’t take risks
    silent generation HYPE
  • 13.
    • Self-absorbed
    • let’s all sing kumbaya
    • what budget?
    • workaholics
    baby boomers HYPE
  • 14.
    • cynical slackers
    • not team players
    • no respect for authority, hierarchy
    • won’t pay their dues
    generation x HYPE
  • 15.
    • unrealistic expectations
    • overly dependent
    • informal to the extreme
    • OMG! WCTUCS?
    millennial generation HYPE
  • 16. 1. Mostly negative HYPE 2. True 3. Solution: blame “them”
  • 17. life stages theory of generations values social moments
  • 18.
    • youth
    • rising adult
    • midlife adult
    • elder
    life stages theory of generations
  • 19. values theory of generations
  • 20.  
  • 21.  
  • 22.  
  • 23. social moments theory of generations
  • 24. The Baby Boom Source: U.S. Census data, reported at www.bbhq.com
  • 25.  
  • 26. silent generation baby boomers generation x millennial generation 1925-42 (68–85) 1943-60 (50–67) 1961-81 (29–49) 1982-2005 (5–28)
  • 27.
    • context: shadow of depression and world war two
    • characteristics: favor command and control, security, delayed reward
    • workplace assets: stable, loyal, hard working
    • workplace liabilities: inept with change, won’t buck system, uncomfortable with conflict
    silent generation: born 1925 to 1942
  • 28.
    • context: protests, youthful rebellion, anti-war, civil rights, social upheaval
    • characteristics: idealistic, group/team focused, hard work for the cause, self-fulfillment
    • workplace assets: driven, service oriented, good team players
    • workplace liabilities: not budget minded, reluctant to go against peers, uncomfortable with conflict
    baby boomers: born 1943 to 1960
  • 29.
    • context: energy crisis, corporate downsizing, inflation, latch-key kids
    • characteristics: independent, less stock in title or position, work-life balance
    • workplace assets: adaptable, independent, techno-literate
    • workplace liabilities: impatient, poor people skills, cynical
    generation x: born 1961 to 1981
  • 30.
    • BORN: 1982 to 2005(?)
    • NAMES: Millennials, the Net Generation, N-Generation, Generation Y
    • workplace assets: collective action, optimism, multitasking
    • workplace liabilities: need supervision, inexperience
    millennials
  • 31. millennials: trends the internet abundance diversity child-focused
  • 32. millennials: trends
  • 33. millennials: trends
  • 34. This is not an unusual response for Josiah or many others: if something they need or want is not available, they simply figure out how to create it on their own. In fact, this behavior calls out a fundamental difference between those living in a participation culture vs. those who have come before. millennials: trends
  • 35. Where’s the mouse? millennials: trends
  • 36. millennials: trends abundance
  • 37. millennials: trends abundance
  • 38. millennials: trends abundance
  • 39. millennials: trends video games
  • 40. millennials: trends video games
  • 41. millennials: trends
  • 42. millennials: trends diversity
  • 43. millennials: trends diversity
  • 44. millennials: trends diversity
  • 45. millennials: trends diversity
  • 46. millennials: trends child-focused
  • 47. millennials: trends child-focused
  • 48. millennials: trends child-focused
  • 49. millennials: trends child-focused
  • 50. millennials: trends silent generation education work leisure baby boomers
  • 51. millennials: trends education work leisure millennials
  • 52.
    • context: the social internet, abundance, diversity, child-focused
    • characterstics: do it ourselves, no waiting, networked, “lines” (offline/online) blurred
    • workplace assets: collective action, optimism, multitasking
    • workplace liabilities: need supervision, inexperience
    millennials
  • 53.
    • Silent: favor command and control, security, delayed reward
    • Boomer: idealistic, group/team focused, hard work for the cause, self-fulfillment
    • Gen X: independent, less stock in title or position, work-life balance
    • Millennial: do it ourselves, no waiting, networked, “lines” (offline/online) blurred
    How do these show up at BC/BS of Florida?
  • 54. so what? Application
  • 55. probability 0 1 never always Application
  • 56. lenses Generations Life stage Economic class Ethnicity Gender Family Region Education Military branch Personality type
  • 57. products and services leadership management conflict Application
  • 58. Example: AARP Application: Products and Services
  • 59. Example: AARP
  • 60. Example: AARP
  • 61. Example: AARP
  • 62. silent generation baby boomers generation x millennial generation Application: Leadership
  • 63. Application: Leadership
  • 64. baby boomers generation x millennial generation Application: Leadership
  • 65. baby boomers generation x millennial generation Application: Leadership
  • 66. Application: Management processes/systems (marketing, recruiting, benefits) teams (roles, meetings, time, technology) management conflict
  • 67. Application: Management Small Groups: leadership processes/systems (marketing, recruiting, benefits) teams (roles, meetings, time, technology)
  • 68. Application: Conflict better conflict conversations
  • 69. Theory: CONFLICT IS GOOD Practice: AVOID CONFLICT LIKE THE PLAGUE
  • 70. How do you feel about conflict? about conflict? HATE DISLIKE OKAY LOVE Avoid Avoid Resolution
  • 71. Self-Perpetuating Cycle Conflict exists We avoid either the conflict or its resolution Conflict gets worse! We avoid more
  • 72. BREAK THE CYCLE: BETTER CONFLICT CONVERSATIONS BETTER CONFLICT CONVERSATIONS
    • 1. Better problem solving
    • 2. Navigating hard conversations
    • 3. Giving better feedback
    Interest-based negotiation
  • 73. BREAK THE CYCLE: BETTER CONFLICT CONVERSATIONS BETTER CONFLICT CONVERSATIONS
    • 1. Better problem solving
    • 2. Navigating hard conversations
    • 3. Giving better feedback
    Ladder of Inference
  • 74. BREAK THE CYCLE: BETTER CONFLICT CONVERSATIONS BETTER CONFLICT CONVERSATIONS
    • 1. Better problem solving
    • 2. Navigating hard conversations
    • 3. Giving better feedback
    Behavior-Impact Feedback
  • 75. BREAK THE CYCLE: BETTER CONFLICT CONVERSATIONS BETTER CONFLICT CONVERSATIONS
    • 1. Better problem solving
    • 2. Navigating hard conversations
    • 3. Giving better feedback
    Behavior-Impact Feedback
  • 76. Navigating Hard Conversations
    • Group Exercise
  • 77. Ladder of Inference I take ACTIONS based on my beliefs I adopt BELIEFS about the world I draw CONCLUSIONS I make ASSUMPTIONS based on the meanings I added I add MEANING (cultural and personal) I SELECT data from what I observe Observable DATA and experiences Source: Peter Senge, et al., The Fifth Discipline Fieldbook, p. 243
  • 78.
    • Work “down” the ladder, both your side and theirs
    • Let in new understanding and new data
    • Don’t fall into generational “traps” (You’re a Boomer, so you...)
    • Use generational knowledge to ask better questions
    Navigating Hard Conversations
  • 79. Giving Better Feedback Behavior-Impact Feedback Model
  • 80.
    • When you [do something]
    • I [react this way]
    • Because [of these reasons]
    Behavior-Impact Feedback Behavior Impact Ladder
  • 81. Giving Better Feedback Group exercise
  • 82. Next Steps If you do what you always did, you’ll get what you always got.
  • 83. [email_address] @jamienotter www.g etmejamienot ter.com
  • 84.