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BMS Literature Searching

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  • Session outline Discuss and develop your understanding of databases Demo how to use a healthcare database called CINAHL You have time to complete an on-line tutorial Then you retrieve your unique username and password from your email and carry out your own search
  • Transcript

    • 1. BMS Literature Searching Jamie Halstead
    • 2. By The End Of The Session You Will Be Able To:
      • Plan for a systematic and comprehensive search
      • Understand and use the electronic databases to find out what sports literature has been published in the academic journals
      • Identify and access the available journals
    • 3. What is a Database?
      • Most databases provide bibliographic details of data published in professional journals including.…
      • - The Author and Title of an article
      • - The Journal in which it is printed
      • - The Volume, Part and Page Numbers of the article
      • - The Abstract, a brief summary of the article
      • - Subject Keywords
      In some cases there will be a link providing access to the full text and/or information regarding the Library’s print holdings
    • 4. When you find an article This is what the “citation” looks like
    • 5. The “complete reference”
    • 6. Evaluation
      • It is very important to evaluate your search results for relevance and quality
      • Is it what you need and is it trustworthy?
      • Do NOT trust information if you have not considered the following criteria:
    • 7.
      • C urrency (How old is this information? When was it last updated?)
      • A uthority (Who is the author, site creator, organisation etc?)
      • I ntent (What is the purpose of the website / information? e.g. financial gain etc)
      • R elevance (Is this what I need? Will it answer my question?)
      • O bjectivity (Balanced view? Opposing views represented? etc)
      Evaluation
    • 8. Peer Review
      • Peer review is a core part of academic research.  It is a formal procedure for checking the quality of research before it is published.  
      • If a publication is peer reviewed it means it has been read, checked and authenticated (reviewed) by independent, third party academics (peers).
      • Peer review has been the quality-control system of academic publishing for hundreds of years.
    • 9. Key Databases For BMS Literature
      • Medline The premier biomedical database
      • Science Citation The leading science
      • Index and technical journals
      • Science Direct Elsevier’s excellent online journal package
    • 10. Plan Your Database Search
      • 1. Define your question
      • Break it down into concepts (databases work best if you break your question down into single subjects)
      • 3. List the words or phrases that you could use for each concept (alternative terms, truncation using * etc)
    • 11. Plan Your Database Search
      • The following resources should help with this process:
      • - Examples of high quality systematic literature reviews (Cochrane Library) http://libguides.mdx.ac.uk/content.php?pid=59606&sid=437989
      • - An example of a search strategy and a worksheet to create your own http://libguides.mdx.ac.uk/content.php?pid=59606&sid=507800
    • 12. Accessing The Databases
      • Go to the Library’s BMS Subject Guide http://libguides.mdx.ac.uk/biomedicalsciences
      • Select Journals
      • Click on Finding Journal Articles / Using Databases
      • Choose a database (e.g. Medline)
    • 13. A Quick Search Demonstration
      • Searching Medline, Science Citation Index and Science Direct for peer reviewed journal articles on:
      • ‘ The effectiveness of tamiflu for the treatment of swine flu’
    • 14. But it’s not in the library
      • Don’t worry…fill out an Inter-Library Loan Form ( http://www.lr.mdx.ac.uk/lib/services/docs/illform.pdf ) with the bibliographic details of the article you want
      • A photocopy of the article will be ordered for you from the British Library
      • This can take approximately a week (sent to your home address)
      • There is a charge of £3 for this service
    • 15. Other Libraries
      • Sconul Access Scheme http://www.sconul.ac.uk/using_other_libraries/access/
      • British Library http://www.bl.uk/
    • 16. Referencing
      • It is vital that your work is properly referenced and you have full bibliographic details of all resources used
      • For details of how to reference your work go to the Library’s BMS Subject Guide and Select Getting Started
      • Then click on the link for the Help sheet for Referencing and Citation Style
    • 17. Contact details
      • Jamie Halstead
      • Liaison Librarian: Health Programmes
      • E-Mail: [email_address]
      • Tel: 020 8411 5991