Caveat Emptor: academic software and user experience

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The role of programming in academic research is diverse, ranging from short experimental scripts to large-scale applications serving as a independent research outputs. Regardless of scale, user experience (UX) is often given a low priority. Researchers commonly develop software for themselves, and if it is released publicly, the code is provided “as is” with little thought given to the experience of the end user. Another scenario is the institutional “flagship project” involving software arising from years of development, with a proportionate user and developer community. In these cases basic details of user experience are also often neglected, and the assumption is made that other researcher-users will “make it work”. If software and its surrounding ecosystem do not provide good user experience, it will ultimately be less widely adopted and the productivity of users will be encumbered. This translates into less effective research with lower impact. In this talk I will discuss the state of the art in user experience design, and suggest ways in which the UX of academic software can be improved.

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Caveat Emptor: academic software and user experience

  1. 1. Thoughts on academic software & user experience...Jamie BullockCaveat EmptorWednesday, 26 June 13
  2. 2. @jamiebullockWednesday, 26 June 13
  3. 3. Software for MusiciansWednesday, 26 June 13
  4. 4. User ExperienceWednesday, 26 June 13
  5. 5. “User experience encompassesall aspects of the end-users interactionwith the company, its services, and its products”— Don NormanWednesday, 26 June 13
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  14. 14. Two types of software...Wednesday, 26 June 13
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  16. 16. Software for Other PeopleWednesday, 26 June 13
  17. 17. Experiences for PeopleWednesday, 26 June 13
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  19. 19. Wednesday, 26 June 13
  20. 20. No-one wants to use softwareWednesday, 26 June 13
  21. 21. What do users want?Wednesday, 26 June 13
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  26. 26. USER EXPERIENCEWednesday, 26 June 13
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  28. 28. I’m a researcher...Wednesday, 26 June 13
  29. 29. Software mediates researchWednesday, 26 June 13
  30. 30. ExperiencedifferentiatesresearchWednesday, 26 June 13
  31. 31. IMPACTWednesday, 26 June 13
  32. 32. Measuring experienceWednesday, 26 June 13
  33. 33. Case StudyWednesday, 26 June 13
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  47. 47. Final thoughts...Wednesday, 26 June 13
  48. 48. Thank You!Wednesday, 26 June 13
  49. 49. CreditsUmbrella image by Dan Willishttp://www.dswillis.comWednesday, 26 June 13

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