Fashion & Social Media Report 2010<br />Europe’s Social Media Partner<br />
We believe in Open Business<br /><ul><li>At the heart of everything we do is Open Business
We believe in business open to it’s stakeholders.
By product and service development, to marketing and customer care, the consumer becomes more deeply engaged.
They become involved in the decisions that matter to them
They care more about the outcomes
They become more loyal
You, Your products and marketing are more likely to become more successful
Social media means there are thousands of live consumer conversations to discover, explore and connect with
Social technologies offer the ability to collaborative in a scalable and more cost efficient way than ever before</li></li...
Organisations need to be clear on what innovations they are hoping to achieve.
They need to continuously look at how efficiency and effectiveness be improved and ROI increased.
We look to increase the value brought to ask many areas of the business as is possible
We usually audit Data, Assets & Operations (listed next slide) but this requires access to the subjects business so when w...
Social Media Audit<br />Data Audit<br />Operations Audit<br />Asset Audit<br />Website Audit<br />Crisis Management Audit<...
 Improved Data ROI
 Improved Data Flow
 Improved Customer Insights
 Improved Market Insights
 Engagement Guidelines
 Escalation protocol
 Improved Customer Satisfaction
 More efficient response management
 Departmental and supplier alignment
 Unified / Converged Presence
 Improved User Experience
 Improved Platform Effectiveness
 Reduced post campaign waste
 Greater ROI on Media Spend</li></li></ul><li>Introduction to Research<br /><ul><li>We took inspiration from Fashion 2.0 S...
We looked at a total of 21 fashion brands (7 Retailers, 7 Luxury and 7 High Street) over the period of June.
Our focus was English speaking, UK were possible, if not US created brand presences in and across  social media
This was on the understanding from our vast global experience as a social media business consultancy that users recognises...
Brand Categories<br />16/07/2010<br />6<br />
Online brand conversations<br /><ul><li>We pulled all conversations over the month of June by brand term using Radian 6 (s...
The results we show is raw volume (unfiltered) 10-40% can usually be irrelevant / spam.
We have excluded the brands; Warehouse, Oli, GAP, Coach and Liberty as their names are too generic and the results would n...
This is an indicative data set to provide some context to our manual research. To see if there was a correlation between t...
The volume will also reflect if they have done any recent activity (both on and offline) and would fluctuate over time.</l...
Luxury<br />High Street<br />Retailer<br />Raw data from Radian 6 to provide context to research for the month of  June 20...
Website<br /><ul><li>We looked at all websites to see how well they had integrated social media into their presence. Acros...
33% of websites had no social media integration, 57% had some kind of above-the-fold and 33% below.
78% had Facebook & Twitter combined (those that didn’t just had a blog)
The average site had at least 2 kinds of social media listed with 1 above and 1 below
All High Street brands (excluding Levi’s) had some kind of social integration with 62.5% of it being below the field.
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Fashion UK Social Media Landscape Audit 9010 Group

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We look at how 21 of the leading fashion brands in the UK are using social media. Including 7 retailers (on and offline), 7 High Street brands and 7 Luxury brands.
If you would like a copy please email jamie@ninety10group.com

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  • Hi Scot. You are exactly right what's the ROI to that adoption? Its this bit we need to be let 'inside' to understand. Its what we hope documents like this get us through the door to address. Its all well and good having integration and big follower numbers but we all know there are many ways you can get these, some good, some bad neither of which we can see from the outside.

    Also these brands are different and not equal as they have been compared naively in our research. Their focus on online and ecommerce, the size of their ad budgets in general varies massively and will impact what we can measure here.

    Its very much a scratch-and-sniff of the surface from a very quantitative viewpoint. But hopefully you found it useful and if nothing indicative of how a sector / and geography are adopting social.

    Thanks for your comment!
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  • Good work, enjoyed reading your analysis. You paint a clear picture of adoption - I guess the big question is whether the best adopters, e.g. Top Shop, are generating the best ROI, and if so, what kind?
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  • Great presentation and analysis on how the fashion industry is embracing social media
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Fashion UK Social Media Landscape Audit 9010 Group

  1. 1. Fashion & Social Media Report 2010<br />Europe’s Social Media Partner<br />
  2. 2. We believe in Open Business<br /><ul><li>At the heart of everything we do is Open Business
  3. 3. We believe in business open to it’s stakeholders.
  4. 4. By product and service development, to marketing and customer care, the consumer becomes more deeply engaged.
  5. 5. They become involved in the decisions that matter to them
  6. 6. They care more about the outcomes
  7. 7. They become more loyal
  8. 8. You, Your products and marketing are more likely to become more successful
  9. 9. Social media means there are thousands of live consumer conversations to discover, explore and connect with
  10. 10. Social technologies offer the ability to collaborative in a scalable and more cost efficient way than ever before</li></li></ul><li>Social Media ROI<br /><ul><li>We believe investment in social media should be treated with the same levels of seriousness and measurement as any other
  11. 11. Organisations need to be clear on what innovations they are hoping to achieve.
  12. 12. They need to continuously look at how efficiency and effectiveness be improved and ROI increased.
  13. 13. We look to increase the value brought to ask many areas of the business as is possible
  14. 14. We usually audit Data, Assets & Operations (listed next slide) but this requires access to the subjects business so when we conduct sector research (as in this document) we focus more on Asset and part of Operations. </li></ul>16/07/2010<br />3<br />
  15. 15. Social Media Audit<br />Data Audit<br />Operations Audit<br />Asset Audit<br />Website Audit<br />Crisis Management Audit<br />Data Archive Audit<br />Content Audit<br />Sales / Acquisitions Audit<br />Data Gap Analysis<br />Social Profiles Audit<br />Customer Services Audit<br />Data ROI Audit<br />Advocate Engagement Audit<br />Data Source Analysis<br />Official Communities Audit<br /><ul><li> Data Reporting Standardisation
  16. 16. Improved Data ROI
  17. 17. Improved Data Flow
  18. 18. Improved Customer Insights
  19. 19. Improved Market Insights
  20. 20. Engagement Guidelines
  21. 21. Escalation protocol
  22. 22. Improved Customer Satisfaction
  23. 23. More efficient response management
  24. 24. Departmental and supplier alignment
  25. 25. Unified / Converged Presence
  26. 26. Improved User Experience
  27. 27. Improved Platform Effectiveness
  28. 28. Reduced post campaign waste
  29. 29. Greater ROI on Media Spend</li></li></ul><li>Introduction to Research<br /><ul><li>We took inspiration from Fashion 2.0 Social Media Awards by The Style Coalition but felt there were many gaps in how brands were assessed choosing to focus rather on: effectiveness over creative innovation
  30. 30. We looked at a total of 21 fashion brands (7 Retailers, 7 Luxury and 7 High Street) over the period of June.
  31. 31. Our focus was English speaking, UK were possible, if not US created brand presences in and across social media
  32. 32. This was on the understanding from our vast global experience as a social media business consultancy that users recognises less traditional geographical market barriers and more by language.</li></ul>16/07/2010<br />5<br />
  33. 33. Brand Categories<br />16/07/2010<br />6<br />
  34. 34. Online brand conversations<br /><ul><li>We pulled all conversations over the month of June by brand term using Radian 6 (social media listening tool) and broke each down by media type.
  35. 35. The results we show is raw volume (unfiltered) 10-40% can usually be irrelevant / spam.
  36. 36. We have excluded the brands; Warehouse, Oli, GAP, Coach and Liberty as their names are too generic and the results would need manually filtering.
  37. 37. This is an indicative data set to provide some context to our manual research. To see if there was a correlation between those brands active if social media and the number of users
  38. 38. The volume will also reflect if they have done any recent activity (both on and offline) and would fluctuate over time.</li></ul>16/07/2010<br />7<br />
  39. 39. Luxury<br />High Street<br />Retailer<br />Raw data from Radian 6 to provide context to research for the month of June 2010<br />
  40. 40. Website<br /><ul><li>We looked at all websites to see how well they had integrated social media into their presence. Across all categories integration was generally poor usually with small Twitter / Facebook icons above or below the fold on the Homepage.
  41. 41. 33% of websites had no social media integration, 57% had some kind of above-the-fold and 33% below.
  42. 42. 78% had Facebook & Twitter combined (those that didn’t just had a blog)
  43. 43. The average site had at least 2 kinds of social media listed with 1 above and 1 below
  44. 44. All High Street brands (excluding Levi’s) had some kind of social integration with 62.5% of it being below the field.
  45. 45. The worst category was, unsurprisingly, Luxury with 58% not having any integration</li></ul>16/07/2010<br />9<br />
  46. 46. ABOVE<br />FOLD<br />Aka if you have to scroll<br />10<br />BELOW<br />
  47. 47. Top SMO Websites<br />Top 10<br /><ul><li> 5 of the Top 10 were High Street brands
  48. 48. Of the remaining 4 (3 were Luxury & 2 Retailer)
  49. 49. Top Shop scored higher because of the prominence of their links although ASOS have a more social website on the whole with its own community
  50. 50. Levis was the only High Street to have no SMO integration on the Homepage the majority were luxury.
  51. 51. Only 3 had YouTube integration, All the Top 10 excluding Warehouse had both Facebook & Twitter
  52. 52. Only 5 of the top 10 had their blog linked on the Homepage </li></ul>16/07/2010<br />11<br />
  53. 53. 16/07/2010<br />12<br />H&M don’t directly link to SM they point to a newsroom which aggregates their content but is in above-fold / top right which as the eye reads is premium space<br />Top Shop give prime space to their blog but have their offsite SM links in the bottom right hand corner of the site<br />
  54. 54. 16/07/2010<br />13<br />Social Newsrooms are great to show transparency, confidence in your product, community spirit and reduce the need for you to create all the content on your site.<br />
  55. 55. 16/07/2010<br />14<br />The most integrated into the site content was D&G and the site design Stella McCartney<br />
  56. 56. 16/07/2010<br />15<br />ASOS Life:<br />Ideas & Forums<br />Wider Community<br />
  57. 57. 16/07/2010<br />16<br />ASOS life have opened up a wider community <br />It experiences active discussions and debate <br />Replies every 18-43 min<br />
  58. 58. They ‘point’ as well as ‘pull’ – embracing the ethos of social media and community spirit by referencing great fashion social media people (bloggers / tweeple) and highlight / aggregate their work<br />16/07/2010<br />17<br />
  59. 59. 16/07/2010<br />18<br />They openly surface what people do and don’t like about ASOS live in a similar way to First Direct – the UK online bank. Builds trust and allows them to easily indentify and fix problems.<br />
  60. 60. Blogging<br /><ul><li>Only 28% of all brands blogged none of which were Luxury
  61. 61. 50% were High Street & 50% retailers
  62. 62. We define blog as a webpage in blog post format that can be commented on. This would exclude brand X.
  63. 63. The average blog had 4 posts and 2 comments a week. Top Shop and Warehouse had the highest number of p.w 4
  64. 64. Topshop received the most comments with 10 per post
  65. 65. French Connection through Facebook Like integration received more Likes in place of comments. We believe this will be a growing trend. Posts will be increasingly more discussed Facebook and with time Twitter over the coming year.
  66. 66. Most blogs were difficult to find, Warehouse had comments disabled, and French Connection’s was men's & US fashion only.
  67. 67. The successes of Topshop show blogging is a valuable but currently massively underutilized tool.</li></ul>16/07/2010<br />19<br />
  68. 68. <ul><li>Whilst ASOS had the most frequent number of blog posts per week with 7, double that of most competitors, Topshop had significantly more engaging posts with a higher comment frequency at almost 10 times the others.
  69. 69. Comment frequency does vary massively month-to-month so this may not be typical over the course of the year
  70. 70. As a brand uses Facebook & Twitter more (especially facebook Likes) comment frequency goes down as it happens elsewhere
  71. 71. Cross match low comments on blog with high comments on Twitter / Facebook
  72. 72. Arguably it is easier for retailers as they have a wider range of products to talk about but the most successfully focus more on wider lifestyle anyway
  73. 73. Warehouse doesn’t not allow comments</li></ul>16/07/2010<br />20<br />
  74. 74. 16/07/2010<br />21<br />The Warehouse blog has a high average of 4 posts a week but they receive almost no comments. We think this is because:<br /><ul><li>Posts are generally well written but due to the drop down menu onsite its difficult to find them
  75. 75. It doesn’t look like their tagging blog-posts to get picked up in search engines
  76. 76. FacebookLike buttons may help improve virality but we think the main reason is because they are in the bottom five on both Twitter & Facebook for activity and there is no RSS feeds to grab easily</li></li></ul><li>ASOS blog doesn’t get many comments because posts are very short and feel rushed. <br />Usually just an image or video just showing what they are up to<br />All this doesn’t stimulate debate<br />If you compare it to Top Shop posts are fewer but more thought through and lifestyle focused in turn attracting greater engagement and commenting<br />16/07/2010<br />22<br />
  77. 77. 16/07/2010<br />23<br />Inbound Links:<br />Warehouse 77<br />
  78. 78. 16/07/2010<br />24<br />Inbound Links:<br />asos197<br />
  79. 79. 16/07/2010<br />25<br />Inbound Links:<br />Top Shop 635<br />
  80. 80. Twitter<br /><ul><li>Most brands had their account registered on average for at least one year. They have carried out 2 Tweets per day (low against other sectors), been listed 777 times, 32,951 tweets
  81. 81. The average number of tweets was 893, 2 per day, following 452 & followers 32,951.
  82. 82. 6 of the Top 10 Twitter accounts surprisingly belonged to luxury brands with just two High Street and two Retailer</li></ul>16/07/2010<br />26<br />
  83. 83. 16/07/2010<br />27<br /><ul><li>The rate of following didn’t make any influence on the number of following with the two highest following brands were DVB with 414 (3rd) and D&G (9th) with 233.
  84. 84. The higher number of following would usually indicate a new account and a drive to recruit but this didn’t ring true here. DVB the oldest account (early adopter) was following the most in the Top 10 and the second highest (D&G) being the youngest
  85. 85. Lists (being listed) did seem to have a correlation with success with 90% of Top 10 having 768+ This would indicate a more mature use and community spirit of the account (point as well as pull) as well wider topic focus (e.g. lifestyle)
  86. 86. So much so Louis Vuitton had the highest number of Lists, lowest number of daily tweets and the 2nd most followers
  87. 87. The tweet topic and style varied dramatically across brands. As is typical those with the least followers tended to be more pure sales orientated.
  88. 88. Tweeter still loves fame, celebs and so will actively follow the closer the access to the star of the brand but one consistently underused features is #hashtags which massively help attract new audiences</li></li></ul><li>16/07/2010<br />28<br /><ul><li>Lots of RT’s and @replies and Tweet Pics
  89. 89. Very conversational
  90. 90. Asking questions to users not just broadcasting info
  91. 91. Although no team members mentioned</li></li></ul><li>16/07/2010<br />29<br /><ul><li> Lots of @replies
  92. 92. DVF personally tweeting ‘DVF’
  93. 93. Not just fashion but also inspirational words to women
  94. 94. No pics / hashtags or Follow Fridays</li></li></ul><li>16/07/2010<br />30<br /><ul><li>Stella McCartney whilst with the most prolific tweets per day 5.2 most were filling noise and wouldn’t inspire conversation
  95. 95. Good use of Tweet Pic, the occasional RT
  96. 96. The fact it has the 2ndhighest number of listings is probably why the followers number is so impressive</li></li></ul><li>Levi Guy<br />16/07/2010<br />31<br /><ul><li>A grad interested in social media.
  97. 97. Good use of #hashtags, @replies and RTs but relatively low following and poor reach
  98. 98. Would be much better as an exclusive brand / team effort</li></li></ul><li>Facebook<br /><ul><li>All brands had a Facebook Fanpage of sorts.
  99. 99. The average page had 378,935 fans, 1,254 Fan Comments (if frequently updated)
  100. 100. The average page has 15 official posts per week, and a total of 551 Official Pics uploaded, 364 Fan Pics, 15 videos
  101. 101. In the Top 10 the most successful categories were Luxury (50%) & High Street (40%) with just one retailer ASOS coming 9th</li></ul>16/07/2010<br />32<br />
  102. 102. 16/07/2010<br />33<br /><ul><li>There was a huge divide between the Top 5 (716k+) and the remaining pages (131k-575k)
  103. 103. It was hard to correlate what gave success (many will be doing ads that we wont pick up
  104. 104. Whilst uploading pictures helped and on occasion video helped it didn't guarantee fans
  105. 105. Again whilst many in the Top 10 had obviously got fans to upload their own pics through competitions, some with great success such as H&M, Coach, DVF, it didnt always give them an advantage over those that didn’t Burberry, Louis Vuitton and D&G having none at all
  106. 106. Whilst didn’t specifically break down view of Likes (would in future research)
  107. 107. Outside of the Top 10 which had a avg. Comment of 1,553 pw going up to 3500-8300 in the higher end, commenting significantly drops of
  108. 108. Aside from Luxury (excluding Burberry) which had a relatively high rate of posts per week (3.5-7pw) The Top 10 generally had lower post rate than the remaining 11.
  109. 109. Levi’s UK was 2nd lowest number of Fans</li></li></ul><li>16/07/2010<br />34<br /><ul><li>H&M’s Facebook Page is more for customer service
  110. 110. So it had the highest number of posts but most were comments in response to others comments</li></li></ul><li>16/07/2010<br />35<br /><ul><li> Loads of Rich media in stream, that gets shared /’Liked’ a lot
  111. 111. Live Facebook Streaming Events
  112. 112. Good link through and up with other environments</li></li></ul><li>Burberry<br />Irregular updates but high interactions from fans on these updates. <br />The Creative Director has created a video explaining why they don’t respond to people on Facebookbut that they do listen<br />Custom built tab introducing the Burberry Sport collection & Art of the Trench campaign <br />16/07/2010<br />36<br />
  113. 113. Levis UK<br />More lifestyle focused (music)<br />1-in-3 music related<br />Raw video files dumped on Facebook (no sharable maybe - rights related)<br />Low number of comments although high number of Likes<br />16/07/2010<br />37<br />
  114. 114. Social Response<br /><ul><li>We tested response times to enquiries made directly to Facebook, Twitter accounts if available.
  115. 115. We posted on a member of the 90:10 teams fashion blog (cupcakeandheels.com) mentioning all brands terms in copy and tags, and that we were conducting research into who was listening to the blogosphere and none replied over a week period. None responded.
  116. 116. Only 4/21 responded by Twitter, 9/21 on Facebook
  117. 117. Of those that did reply on Facebook it took them on average 1,409 minutes (23 Hours) although most within the hour. All Saints and ASOS being in best with 12 & 13min, Levi’s was the last with 7 days
  118. 118. We advise our clients to respond within 24 hours to be acceptable. Most were well below this with the average skeward by Levi’s 7 days for Facebook response but on twitter they were the quickest (within 1min!). It also has a lot to do with luck who was looking at it the time we did it. The quickest on Facebook was All Saints in 12min and Westfield with 13.
  119. 119. On Twitter of the four that did reply (Levi’ Oli, Coach Liberty) Levi was best within the minute and the only High Street!
  120. 120. All in Luxury was the poorest performer across the platforms. Luxury brands were the worst offenders with 86% not responding at all on Twitter. They were also the worst category on Facebook with 59% unanswered.
  121. 121. Retailers and High Street both failed with 43% not responding on Facebook however.
  122. 122. Overall the tone of response was strong; 46% were Very Positive (Extra Mile), 46% Positive (Helpful) with one Neutral (Matter of Fact)</li></ul>16/07/2010<br />38<br />
  123. 123. 16/07/2010<br />39<br />http://bit.ly/95xa9F<br />
  124. 124. 16/07/2010<br />40<br />
  125. 125. Social Status<br />High reach<br />High<br />engagement<br />Low engagement<br />Low reach<br />
  126. 126. Research Summary<br /><ul><li>Through our research the typical brand was Jimmy Choo measured against their sector for reach and engagement. Measured against any other sector they had very low numbers and levels of social integration and activity.
  127. 127. This shows a huge need for Fashion to catch up with the experience users now expect with brands in the social space. It also offers the opportunity for those that increase and improve their activity to standout from the pack.
  128. 128. In retail for many it is playing catch-up with ASOS and Top Shop and High Street keeping pace with Luxury.
  129. 129. H&M whilst with good engagement and massive Facebook reach could have been one of the leading brands but failed to have any real effect in Twitter
  130. 130. Topshop & ASOS were leaders, with TopShop the winner, due to their combined reach on both Twitter and Facebook and both had a significant lead on their category competitors
  131. 131. Surprisingly 3 Luxury brands came next with Louis Vuitton, Coach and D&G all showing good reach and levels of engagement
  132. 132. There was a huge divide between these brands and others. Burberry, GAP & Selfridge’s good reach was not supported by good levels of engagement within their communities. Without knowing exactly how they have achieved such numbers it would suggest paid-for advertising or offline activity may be the reason they have this without engagement
  133. 133. We do know activity such as Live Event Broadcasting and blogger outreach by Burberry have contributed to their ‘reach’ success, neither can be measured in this research, but further inspection will be carried out with each brand post audit to fill in these gaps</li></ul>16/07/2010<br />42<br />
  134. 134. <ul><li>In summary all types of fashion brands have adopted social media in some way. A handful understand reach and engagement are both important KPIs with many others either not investing enough resource into developing their presence generally or focusing more on the traditional KPI of Reach
  135. 135. Having spoken with a number of the brands post-research many seem to confuse a good digital marketing strategy with good adoption and use of social media
  136. 136. We define ‘good adoption’ as utilizing connectivity and flow of insight with the consumer and other stakeholders to the benefit of the whole supply chain. This requires a converged approach across all departments
  137. 137. We believe increasingly as consumers come to expect a certain presence and level of adoption from all types of brands online just having the promotion function of the business using social media will be perceived very negatively
  138. 138. Using it as just another channel to push digital assets will put brands at a disadvantage to their competitors who embrace a more holistic approach
  139. 139. Few luxury brands we spoke to are willing to let employees, unless they have a brand figure head, speak on their behalf. This comes from a legacy of carefully controlling the tone of their messaging to reflect brand values
  140. 140. Use and real socialisation of video, as well as underutilisation of blogging are common
  141. 141. Overtime fashion brands will realise allocation of resource into Engagement as seen in the case of Coach will lead to greater Reach and deeper levels of engagement with far greater ROI than other innovations</li></ul>16/07/2010<br />43<br />
  142. 142. So what are you waiting for get in touch?<br />Contact: <br />Jamie Burke CEO 90:10 Group<br />jamie@ninety10group.com<br />Lidia MirasHead of Fashion & Spanish Market<br />lidia@ninety10group.com<br />
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