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Trends in Trade Book Retailing 2011

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The report exhibits a trend unique to bookstores, which "subsidize" the e-book market by acting as a book showroom for nearly 10% of U.S. adults. …

The report exhibits a trend unique to bookstores, which "subsidize" the e-book market by acting as a book showroom for nearly 10% of U.S. adults.

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  • 1. Trends in Trade Book Retailing 2011Published: August 2011No. of Pages: 126Price: $ 2745Recent news in book retailing has stunned most observers of the publishing world, butSimba Information and the buyers of the Trends in Trade Book Retailing series have beenahead of the curve: this report series, now in its third year, has long predicted thechallenges of Borders Group and other retailers and documented the price wars long beforethe first shot was fired.Trends in Trade Book Retailing 2011 compiles national data on who is buying books and e-books, what theyre buying and where they‟re buying them, as well as detailed overviews ofthe major channels, how their market share is trending, and what outside factors areaffecting each. The report provides a “scorecard” for each channel—bookstores, theInternet, book clubs, and “other”—and a demographic overview of the average consumer.The report exhibits a trend unique to bookstores, which "subsidize" the e-book market byacting as a book showroom for nearly 10% of U.S. adults.Browse All: Retail Market ResearchSimba compiled trusted nationally representative data from Experian Simmons for thisanalysis. The four channels are also ranked by the estimated number of customers, whatformats they buy, and how many titles the consumers purchase and how things aretrending in each channel now that e-books are part of the equation.With the book retailing segment as challenged as it is, no publisher, retailer, or industryanalyst can afford not to have this vital tool.E-Book Market Partially "Subsidized" by Physical Bookstores
  • 2. Stamford, CT - August 31, 2011 - A recent report by media and publishing forecast firmSimba Information found that even though bookstores have lost some of their customerbase over the years, the channel feeds into the e-book universe by serving as a bookshowroom for the roughly 10% of U.S. adults who buy e-books."Believing that adults will begin taking to e-books in large numbers because of Bordersliquidation is a dangerous assumption," said Michael Norris, senior analyst of SimbaInformations Trade Books Group, commenting on the report. "Since most adults buy booksfrom multiple channels and enjoy using bookstores for browsing, the loss of a bookshowroom can impact print books and e-books in unexpected ways."Data from Simba indicates that the more channels a consumer uses, the more likely he/sheis to buy—even though bookstores are sometimes cut out of the action. In a Simba surveyof over 110 bookstores across the country, 38% indicated that their (former) regularcustomers who own a Barnes & Noble Nook or an Amazon Kindle often or very often returnto browse without buying anything. 43% of the same booksellers also said non-regularcustomers often or very often come to browse before leaving to buy from another retailer."Publishers should be working around the clock to find ways to make chain and independentbookstores stronger, and not for reasons having to do with sentimentality," Norris said. "Ifthe only retailers left selling books are those that dont need to, publishers will lose theirpower and relevance overnight. I genuinely worry that books may follow the same dreadfulpath of music, where gadgets like the iPod spring up to make consumption easy, theshowrooms for media discovery close, piracy becomes a cultural expectation and the marketshrinks by billions as more people buy less."The report, "Trends in Trade Book Retailing 2011," also shows the interconnected world ofretailing with thorough profiles of the bookstore, online and other major retailing channels,outlining key demographic details and trends unique to each, including the gender, age,household income, education level and purchasing habits of the buyers. The significantinfluence of non-bookstore physical store retailers like Walmart and Target and the influenceof e-book sellers like Amazon.com are also covered.Table of ContentsMethodologyChapter 1: IntroductionIntroductionChapter 2: Channel Trends & DemographicsIntroductionEstimated Size of the Book Market (Retail Level)
  • 3. Book Consumption TrendsThe Four ChannelsOther Trends in Book RetailingDemographic Data and the ChannelsGenderAgeRaceRegion and Metro MarketsEducation LevelEmployment StatusProfessionIndividual & Household IncomeMarital StatusNo. of People in HouseholdNo. of Children in HouseholdAge of Children in HouseholdType and Value of ResidenceTable 2.1: Overview of Book Purchasing Population (U.S. Adults): Consumers Who Did/DidNot Buy a Book in Previous 12 MonthsTable 2.2: Overview of Book Purchasing Population (U.S. Adults): Sales Channel TrendsTable 2.3: Overview of Book Purchasing Population (U.S. Adults): Buying Books as GiftsTable 2.4: Overview of Book Purchasing Population (U.S. Adults): Customer TrendsTable 2.5: Overview of Book Purchasing Population (U.S. Adults): Sales Channel TrendsTable 2.6: Overview of Book Purchasing Population (U.S. Adults): The Channels CrossedAgainst ThemselvesTable 2.7: Overview of Book Purchasing Population (U.S. Adults): Channel Allocations:Type of Book PurchasedTable 2.8: Overview of Book Purchasing Population (U.S. Adults): Channel Allocation: No.of Hardcover Books PurchasedTable 2.9: Overview of Book Purchasing Population (U.S. Adults): Channel Allocation: No.of Paperback Books PurchasedTable 2.10: Overview of Book Purchasing Population (U.S. Adults): Channel Preferences byGenderTable 2.11: Overview of Book Purchasing Population (U.S. Adults): Channel Preferences byAgeTable 2.12: Overview of Book Purchasing Population (U.S. Adults): Channel Preferences byRaceTable 2.13: Overview of Book Purchasing Population (U.S. Adults): Channel Preferences byRegionTable 2.14: Overview of Book Purchasing Population (U.S. Adults): Channel Preferences byMetro MarketTable 2.15: Overview of Book Purchasing Population (U.S. Adults): Channel Preferences byEducation LevelTable 2.16: Overview of Book Purchasing Population (U.S. Adults): Channel Preferences byEmployment StatusTable 2.17: Overview of Book Purchasing Population (U.S. Adults): Channel Preferences byProfessionTable 2.18: Overview of Book Purchasing Population (U.S. Adults): Channel Preferences by
  • 4. Individual IncomeTable 2.19: Overview of Book Purchasing Population (U.S. Adults): Channel Preferences byHousehold IncomeTable 2.20: Overview of Book Purchasing Population (U.S. Adults): Channel Preferences byMarital StatusTable 2.21: Overview of Book Purchasing Population (U.S. Adults): Channel Preferences byNo. of People in HouseholdTable 2.22: Overview of Book Purchasing Population (U.S. Adults): Channel Preferences byAge of Children in HouseholdTable 2.23: Overview of Book Purchasing Population (U.S. Adults): Channel Allocation byChildren/No Children in HouseholdTable 2.24: Overview of Book Purchasing Population (U.S. Adults): Channel Preferences byType of ResidenceTable 2.25: Overview of Book Purchasing Population (U.S. Adults): Channel Preferences byValue of ResidenceChapter 3: Bookstore Performance and ChallengesIntroductionThe Importance of Bookstores Over Other ChannelsBookstore TrendsSuperstores and Small-Format Store ClosingsPerformance and Outlook of the Big Three ChainsBarnes & NobleBorders GroupBooks-A-MillionOperating performances at the Big Three ChainsIndependent Booksellers and Small ChainsTable 3.1: Bookstore Users: Key Statistics and DemographicsTable 3.2: Bookstore ONLY Users: Key Statistics and DemographicsTable 3.3: Number of Superstore Outlets, 2006-2010Table 3.4: Borders Stores Outlets by StateTable 3.5: Leading Bookstore Chains Revenue Growth, 2006-2010Table 3.6: Growth in Superstore Sales, Major Retail Chains, 2006-2010Table 3.7: Big Three Bookstore Chains Operating Performance, 2006-2010Table 3.8: Who is The Most Common/Least Common Customer at Your Sore?Table 3.9: Tools Used by Independent Bookstores, 2010Table 3.10: Independent Bookstores and E-BooksTable 3.11: How was the first four months of 2010 at your store compared to the sameperiod 2009?Table 3.12: How was the first four months of 2011 at your store compared to the sameperiod 2010?Chapter 4: Internet Retailing and Digital DistributionIntroductionAmazon.comThe Big ThreeeBay and the Purveyance of Used Books
  • 5. E-BooksOnline Book Buyer CharacteristicsOnline ONLY Book Buyer CharacteristicsTable 4.1: Amazon‟s Net Sales and Total Media Sales Growth, Q12007-Q42010Table 4.2: Amazon‟s Media Sales vs Electronic Sales as a Percentage of Total Sales, 2007-2010Table 4.3: Amazon Users and BooksTable 4.4: Amazon and Cross Channel Book PurchasingTable 4.5: Amazon and Multiple Book BuyersTable 4.6: Amazon Users and E-Book DevicesTable 4.7: Revenue of Leading Online Booksellers, 2006-2010Table 4.8: Impact of Fee Reduction on eBay Book AuctionsTable 4.9: Devices Used to Read E-Books, 2008-2010Table 4.10: Online Book Buyers; Key Statistics and DemographicsTable 4.11: Online ONLY Users: Key Statistics and DemographicsChapter 5: The Growth of Non-Bookstore Retailers andTheir ImpactIntroductionOverview of „Other‟ BuyersTable 5.1: Number of Stores, Big Three vs. Big BoxTable 5.2: Price Comparison of the Top 10 Bestselling Books at Select Stores, July 2011Table 5.3: “Other” Users: Key Statistics and DemographicsChapter 6: Consumer PsychographicsIntroductionTable 6.1: Overview of Book Purchasing Population (U.S. Adults): Attitudes and Opinionsof the Internet By Channel, Any AgreeTable 6.2: Overview of Book Purchasing Population (U.S. Adults): Attitudes and Opinionsof the Internet, By Channel (Continued)Table 6.3: Overview of Book Purchasing Population (U.S. Adults): Attitudes and Opinionsof Television, By ChannelTable 6.4: Overview of Book Purchasing Population (U.S. Adults): Attitudes and Opinionsof Advertising, By ChannelTable 6.5: Overview of Book Purchasing Population (U.S. Adults): Attitudes and Opinionsof Shopping, By ChannelTable 6.6: Overview of Book Purchasing Population (U.S. Adults): Impulse ShoppingHabits, By ChannelChapter 7: Conclusions and RecommendationsIntroductionRecommendationsChapter 8: Channel ProfilesIntroductionTable 8.1: Book Club Users: Key Statistics and Demographics
  • 6. Table 8.2: Book Store Users: Key Statistics and DemographicsTable 8.3: Book Store ONLY Users: Key Statistics and DemographicsTable 8.4: Online Book Buyers: Key Statistics and DemographicsTable 8.5: Online ONLY Users: Key Statistics and DemographicsTable 8.6: “Other” Users: Key Statistics and DemographicsProfiles of Leading BooksellersAmazon.comBarnes & NobleBooks-A-MillionBorders GroupAbout Us:ReportsnReports is an online library of over 100,000+ market research reports and in-depthmarket research studies & analysis of over 5000 micro markets. We provide 24/7 online andoffline support to our customers. Get in touch with us for your needs of market researchreports.Follow us on Twitter: http://twitter.com/marketsreportsOur Facebook Page: http://www.facebook.com/pages/ReportsnReports/191441427571689Contact:Mr.Priyank7557 Rambler road,Suite727,Dallas,TX75231Tel: + 1 888 391 5441E-mail: sales@reportsandreports.comhttp://www.reportsnreports.comVisit our Market Research Blog