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1
The History
Photography
As It Relates To The
Printed Image
2
Photography is Born
In 1839 Louis Jacques Mande
Daguerre, a French scientist
and William Henry Fox Talbot, a
British sch...
3
Daguerreotype vs. Calotype
Daguerre would call his process the daguerreotype while Talbot
would call his the calotype.
B...
4
Daguerreotype Prefered
Users also preferred the daguerreotype for its exacting realism.
While this was an advantage it a...
5
Fredrick Scott Archer
• In 1851 an Englishman
Fredrick Scott Archer
devised the wet collodion
plate
• Used a glass plate...
6
The Tin Type
• In 1856, Hamilton Smith,
discovered that collodion
emulsion could be poured onto
any number of surfaces,
...
7
Eastman Kodak
• By 1888, George Eastman
creates the Eastman Kodak
Company
• Develops a camera that used
his newly develo...
8
Eastman Kodak
• By 1935, Kodak had
experimented and developed
the first color film,
Kodachrome. Again,
processing had to...
9
Kodachrome
By 1935, Kodak had experimented and developed the first color
film, Kodachrome.
Again, processing had to be d...
10
Digital Photography
History
11
Brief History of Digital
• 1950’s and the dawn of television
• 1960’s and NASA
• 1984 and the first commercial “digital...
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Transcript of "History of photography-notes"

  1. 1. 1 The History Photography As It Relates To The Printed Image
  2. 2. 2 Photography is Born In 1839 Louis Jacques Mande Daguerre, a French scientist and William Henry Fox Talbot, a British scholar, independently announced the invention of photography. In 1839 Louis Jacques Mande Daguerre, a French scientist and William Henry Fox Talbot, a British scholar, independently announced the invention of photography.
  3. 3. 3 Daguerreotype vs. Calotype Daguerre would call his process the daguerreotype while Talbot would call his the calotype. Both would be entirely different. The daguerreotype would use a polished metal plate and produce a positive image although reversed form left to right. The calotype was a positive print made form a paper negative, thus allowing for reproduction of the image. The daguerreotype would prevail as the prominent choice as Daguerre sold his technology to the French Parliament and they in turn opened it to the world free of charge. Talbot would restrict his creation by making prospective users take out a license.
  4. 4. 4 Daguerreotype Prefered Users also preferred the daguerreotype for its exacting realism. While this was an advantage it also had its disadvantages as it was had very low sensitivity to light and small apertures. Thus many images would be blurred if the subjects did not whole perfectly still.
  5. 5. 5 Fredrick Scott Archer • In 1851 an Englishman Fredrick Scott Archer devised the wet collodion plate • Used a glass plate coated with a sticky solution of nitrocellulose dissolved in alcohol and ether • Sensitized by dipping it in silver nitrate • The disadvantage of this process was the plate had to be exposed while wet and developed almost immediately In 1851 an Englishman Fredrick Scott Archer devised the wet collodion plate. The new collodion plate would use a glass plate coated with a sticky solution of nitrocellulose dissolved in alcohol and ether, sensitized by dipping it in silver nitrate. The disadvantage of this process was the plate had to be exposed while wet and developed almost immediately.
  6. 6. 6 The Tin Type • In 1856, Hamilton Smith, discovered that collodion emulsion could be poured onto any number of surfaces, including leather and cardboard • Smith sensitized a preblackened sheet of thin iron, and then exposed it in a camera. The idea worked and, soon images on iron plates were sold to an increasingly enthusiastic public. • The tintype was cheap, durable and easy to mail, the poor man’s daguerreotype. In 1856, Hamilton Smith, discovered that collodion emulsion could be poured onto any number of surfaces, including leather and cardboard Smith sensitized a preblackened sheet of thin iron, and then exposed it in a camera. The idea worked and, soon images on iron plates were sold to an increasingly enthusiastic public. The tintype was cheap, durable and easy to mail, the poor man’s daguerreotype.
  7. 7. 7 Eastman Kodak • By 1888, George Eastman creates the Eastman Kodak Company • Develops a camera that used his newly developed technology, roll film. • “You press the button, we do the rest” By 1888, George Eastman had created the Eastman Kodak Company, which specialized in gelatin dry plates. He then created and marketed a camera that used his newly developed technology, roll film. The user purchased a camera, took up to 100 photos, then shipped it back to the factory where a new roll would be loaded and the images developed. This gave way to the popular slogan, “You press the button, we do the rest”
  8. 8. 8 Eastman Kodak • By 1935, Kodak had experimented and developed the first color film, Kodachrome. Again, processing had to be done at the factory, but it was instantly successful. • Film photography would continue to evolve over the years, paving the way for innovation and advancements. By 1935, Kodak had experimented and developed the first color film, Kodachrome. Again, processing had to be done at the factory, but it was instantly successful. Film photography would continue to evolve over the years, paving the way for innovation and advancements.
  9. 9. 9 Kodachrome By 1935, Kodak had experimented and developed the first color film, Kodachrome. Again, processing had to be done at the factory, but it was instantly successful. Film photography would continue to evolve over the years, paving the way for innovation and advancements.
  10. 10. 10 Digital Photography History
  11. 11. 11 Brief History of Digital • 1950’s and the dawn of television • 1960’s and NASA • 1984 and the first commercial “digital camera” • 1988 invention of film scanners • 1994 manufacturers develop their own digital cameras • Late 90’s quality of digital is up and technology is cheap This history of digital begins in the early 1950’s with the dawn of television, when the first Video Tape recorders were created. This allowed television studios to record the digital signal to magnetic tape. By the 1960’s, NASA sent probes to the moon but had problems with the analog signals. They then fed the signals through a computer, which aided in “cleaning up” the signals to something that they would actually use. The cold war helped to accelerate the technology. The first commercial “digital camera” was created by Canon, a Japanese camera company. It was tested at the Los Angeles Olympic Games and “The pictures it took were published the next day in a Japanese newspaper. The experiment worked so well that Canon decided to put the camera on the market”. By 1988, a new device was created that allowed a photographer to scan his or her film; he or she would then have a digital copy of the film. By 1994, several manufacturers had developed their own digital cameras. By the late 1990’s, the quality of digital would be good enough and cheap enough for the general user.

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