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My objective is to ascertain and comprehend the contemporary societal conditions, that have promoted the formation of anime and magna fandom communities in the context of modern Japanese and U.S. ...

My objective is to ascertain and comprehend the contemporary societal conditions, that have promoted the formation of anime and magna fandom communities in the context of modern Japanese and U.S. societies. By examining the developmental trends of anime and manga through the lenses of academic and scholarly sources, I aim to better understand the status of global cultural phenomenon behind anime and manga

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  • Thesis: My objective is to ascertain and comprehend the contemporary societal conditions, that have promoted the formation of anime and magna fandom communities in the context of modern Japanese and U.S. societies. By examining the developmental trends of anime and manga through the lenses of academic and scholarly sources, I aim to better understand the status of global cultural phenomenon behind anime and manga.
  • In 1962 a group of ten founding countries ( Japan and US founding members) agreed to participate in the General Arrangements to Borrow (GAB) in which the group agreed to make resources available to the IMF for drawings by participants, under circumstances, for drawings by nonparticipants
  • Gedo, was a popular Japanese “hard rock” band, which reached peaked popularity during the late 1960’s and 70’s. Take a listen to their classic hit “ Don’t Run Away” http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=zLryDZdjybo . I think they emulate they American hard rock bands such as the Ramones , The Kinks, and the Beatles. I was surprised by how much I actually liked it.
  • Tezuka established an important historical precedence, to which his works have provided important social commentary on the conditions of contemporary society, which spoke to his audiences, and mirrored their existence. sub-cultural group that encompasses participants from various social-economic , geographic, political, theological and philosophical backgrounds

Bronstein research topicpresentation Presentation Transcript

  • 1. Anime and Manga Fandom; Providing an Outlet to Develop Real Human Connections in an Increasingly Isolated Global Society By: Jake Bronstein
  • 2. Thesis Statement
  • 3. Introduction: Rationalization of the Formation of Fandom Communities -Noticeable decline in “ social capital” within the context of contemporary societies following Japan and the United States’ transition into a postindustrial technology era (Puntnam, 49). -Societal “disconnect” trends have contributed to the growing state of alienation, in which members of society look to fill their voids (lack of community) by forming sub-cultural groups, such as anime and fandom communities - In my research I look to assert that, that the experienced growth of anime fandom culture in the United States and Japan, can largely be contributed to the need to develop and maintain, real human inter-personal connections; to which have been steadily declining since the post-industrial era (Napier, 47).
  • 4. Historical Overview: Cross Cultural Conditions Leading To Acceptance of Pop- Cultural Commodities Between U.S. and Japan Japan during the post-war period implemented policies that would engage the state in international matters. Specifically implementing “open door” trade policies, with states such as the US; in a concentrated effort to reconnect its self with the free market world (HallWood, 172).
  • 5. American Rock; Paving theWay for U.S.- Japanese Pop-Cultural Exchanges Noted by 1970, Japanese rock took onAmerican musical influences by incorporating English phrases in their song composition. Japanese music gained external influence, while maintaining specific traits that ensured its unique “Japaneseness” (Stephens, 134).
  • 6. U.S.-Japanese EconomicTies; Responsible for the Formation of Sub-Cultural Groups  As U.S.-Japanese relations strengthened, and complex inter-dependencies took place as Foreign Direct Investment brought expansion to the Japanese economy during the 1960’s and 70’s, causing mass waves of urbanization, as the formation of a urban middleclass (Hallwood, 176)  Commodification of goods, services, peoples and ideas within Japanese and U.S. contemporary societies, brought about mainstream cultural attitudes that denoted individualism, in effort to deter people from becoming outliers of society, and critics of the system 
  • 7. Anime and Magna Fandom; an escapist outlet to reality “Fans operate from a position of cultural marginality, in response to the complexities and problems of the contemporary world” ( Napier .50). OsamuTezuka since the post-war period provided an escapist outlet for viewers facing the harsh realities of destruction,poverty , and deat that plagued their existence
  • 8. Examining Internet Based Fandom Communities Miyazaki Mailing List (MML), an international group of fans devoted to works of Miyazaki Hayao and Takahata Isao. Illuminates MML not only as a Internet Community, but as sub-cultural group that embraces the development of inter-personal bounds among individuals from diverse backgrounds. ”The internet has enabled marginalized fans to take their first step into a larger world, by constructing a forum that connects peopl with others who share their reality and perception of society” (Napier,50).
  • 9. Anime and Mange's universal appeal  Anime fandom, is not simply the formation of sub-cultural communities looking to escape a disappointing reality. On the contrary they are “extremely aware of the problems of the real world and see in Miyazaki and Isao’s environmental and humanist message a call for action”(Napier, 59).
  • 10. Conclusion  Upon examining anime fandom, universal principles are established as guidelines, to which these communities find to be inherently important to humanity.The creation of anime and manga fandom communities, is reflective of the resonation found among global audiences that identify with the ideals, ideologies, and humanistic beliefs portrayed in manga and anime. Anime and magna fandom allows individuals within an increasingly globalized society to socialize, and form bonds based on emotional and intellectual basis; in effort to confront universal problems that threaten the state of humanity.
  • 11. Sources Used  Napier, Susan “ World of Anime in America.” Mechademia, Vol. 1, Emerging Worlds of Anime and Manga (2006) :46-63.Web. 24 July. 2013.  Silvio, Carl. “ Anime, both Global and Local.” Science Fiction Studies Volume. 29, No. 3(2002):489-491. Web. 24 July. 2013  Allison, Brent. “Anime: Comparing Macro and Micro Analyses.” Mechademia Vol. 2, Networks of Desire (2007):287-300. Web. 24 July. 2013.  Stevens, Carolyn S. “ Japanese Popular Music: Culture, Authenticity, and Power.” NewYork, NewYork: Routledge, 2008: 1-250. Web. 24 July. 2013  Hallwood, Paul. “World Capital Markets: Challenge to the G-10.” International AffairsVolume. 78, No.1 (2002): 170-177.Web. 24 July. 2013.  Puttnam, Robert D. “ Bowling Alone:The Collapse and Revival of American Community.” NewYork, NewYork: Simon & Schuster, 2000: 1-541.Web. 24 July. 2013  Skinner, Kenneth. “ Salaryman Comics In Japan: Images of Self-Perception.” The Journal of Popular CultureVolume. 8, No. 1 (1979): 141-151.Web. 24 July. 2013