Cust Svc Exceeding Exp Ppt

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This powerpoint presentation helps to establish basics for taking care of customers while at the same time reiterates examples numerous times for people who are crucial to our customer satisfaction. It addresses how devastating the loss of one customer can be through not providing the ultimate customer experience. one service failure can sink a business. Your frontline people and everyone they work with are part of the internal customer network. As a team they must all work together to provide the unforgettable customer experience and exceed the customers\’ expectations.

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  • Customer Service: Exceeding Customer Expectations and Creating an experience
  • Customer service should create win-win results for the customer, the organization, and the person delivering the service.   We will discuss the importance of customer service and look at the challenges faced by the organization and the customer service provider. RETAIL TRAINING ONLY: Watch “Essentials of Great Service” Video Now
  • Techniques vary department to department - business to business. Basics always stay the same…here are some things to keep in mind… 1. Customers perspective – customer could have just lost a loved one! You don’t know…??? - Treat everyone special – have compassion Health Care …sick, grouchy, bad mood Social Services …out of work, no money, no food??? Finance …times are hard, you are taking their money! Retail …dealing with life’s ups and downs 2. Smile - May not show but makes them feel better - Hello, good morning, good bye, hope they feel better, have a nice day - Be Genuine / Sincere / Warm 3. Put them first - patient, client, customer - call ahead/reschedule appts when necessary - use manners…don’t interrupt, excuse yourself to talk to others, answer phone, etc. 4. Be prompt - Especially if sick, give updates if waiting 4. Provide assistance - make things easy - when needed jump at the chance to help, - remind them of things they need, - ASK if they have needs / how you can help? / help to car? - Anticipate questions
  • Refer to the handout “Attitude” by Charles Swindoll.
  • Customers are the life blood of an organization and the organization’s long-term existence depends on customer loyalty . Whether you are in sales or not it is good to know the difference between Repeat Sales versus One Time Sales? Let’s use a door to door salesman for example…Schwan’s vs. Kirby Kirby wants the one time sale – after that they don’t care….they don’t care about how they treat you as long as you buy. Schwan’s wants you to keep coming back… they are going to sell you on service - Service Makes The Sale! We need to be focused on that repeat sale….that’s CUSTOMER SERVICE!
  • However, it it’s not always easy to provide good service. There are challenges to delivering great customer service: Customer service has become a competitive advantage . Organizations publicize customer service as a benefit to the customer. Customers now have more choices and more ways of buying products and services. Customers’ needs are constantly changing , so they expect more from us How do we keep that competitive advantage? SERVICE! What are the customer choices in YOUR department? How do they find out about those choices? PUBLICIZE…MARKETING… WORD OF MOUTH is the most effective form of marketing
  • However, it it’s not always easy to provide good service. Here are some challenges to delivering great customer service: Customer service has become a competitive advantage . How do we keep that competitive advantage? PRICE?, QUALITY?, SELECTION?, SERVICE? Businesses publicize customer service as a benefit to the customer. Customers now have more choices and more ways of buying products and services. What are the customer choices in YOUR department? How do they find out about those choices? PUBLICIZE…MARKETING… WORD OF MOUTH is the most effective form of marketing Customers’ needs are constantly changing , so they expect more from us in the way of meeting their needs. How are their needs changing?
  • However, it it’s not always easy to provide good service. There are challenges to delivering great customer service: Customer service has become a competitive advantage . Organizations publicize customer service as a benefit to the customer. Customers now have more choices and more ways of buying products and services. Customers’ needs are constantly changing , so they expect more from us How do we keep that competitive advantage? SERVICE! What are the customer choices in YOUR department? How do they find out about those choices? PUBLICIZE…MARKETING… WORD OF MOUTH is the most effective form of marketing
  • However, it it’s not always easy to provide good service. There are challenges to delivering great customer service: Customer service has become a competitive advantage . Organizations publicize customer service as a benefit to the customer. Customers now have more choices and more ways of buying products and services. Customers’ needs are constantly changing , so they expect more from us How do we keep that competitive advantage? SERVICE! What are the customer choices in YOUR department? How do they find out about those choices? PUBLICIZE…MARKETING… WORD OF MOUTH is the most effective form of marketing
  • However, it it’s not always easy to provide good service. There are challenges to delivering great customer service: Customer service has become a competitive advantage . Organizations publicize customer service as a benefit to the customer. Customers now have more choices and more ways of buying products and services. Customers’ needs are constantly changing , so they expect more from us How do we keep that competitive advantage? SERVICE! What are the customer choices in YOUR department? How do they find out about those choices? PUBLICIZE…MARKETING… WORD OF MOUTH is the most effective form of marketing
  • Customers and team members can come from many different backgrounds, generations and lifestyles. This diversity plays a role in customer service. Customers from different generations have distinct needs and choices of delivery methods for the same product or service. Cultural diversity also impacts the delivery of good service. In addition, customer service providers (that’s us) are diverse themselves, which can lead to challenges in communication and teamwork. Organizations are operating in a lean culture with little room for error or redundancy. Training budgets are shrinking so there’s a lack of training and support . We’re trimming the fat in a down economy! Team members have their plates full and tend to focus only on their own direct issues. Technologies don’t always fully support the delivery of great service. New technologies take time to learn and implement. After this training, you will be more confident in your skills for dealing with customers.
  • Customers and team members can come from many different backgrounds, generations and lifestyles. This diversity plays a role in customer service. Customers from different generations have distinct needs and choices of delivery methods for the same product or service. Cultural diversity also impacts the delivery of good service. In addition, customer service providers (that’s us) are diverse themselves, which can lead to challenges in communication and teamwork. Organizations are operating in a lean culture with little room for error or redundancy. Training budgets are shrinking so there’s a lack of training and support . We’re trimming the fat in a down economy! Team members have their plates full and tend to focus only on their own direct issues. Technologies don’t always fully support the delivery of great service. New technologies take time to learn and implement. After this training, you will be more confident in your skills for dealing with customers.
  • Customers and team members can come from many different backgrounds, generations and lifestyles. This diversity plays a role in customer service. Customers from different generations have distinct needs and choices of delivery methods for the same product or service. Cultural diversity also impacts the delivery of good service. In addition, customer service providers (that’s us) are diverse themselves, which can lead to challenges in communication and teamwork. Organizations are operating in a lean culture with little room for error or redundancy. Training budgets are shrinking so there’s a lack of training and support . We’re trimming the fat in a down economy! Team members have their plates full and tend to focus only on their own direct issues. Technologies don’t always fully support the delivery of great service. New technologies take time to learn and implement. After this training, you will be more confident in your skills for dealing with customers.
  • What does it take to be the ultimate service provider? SPEAKER NOTES : Refer to 10 keys to Optimum Customer Service and Profitability Compassion: let’s talk more about compassion! Do you know what your customer / client went through last month, last week, yesterday, this morning? Did they lose a loved one? Are they clinically depressed? Could they afford anything to eat today? Are they sleeping at night? Have you walked in their shoes? If you remember one thing from this training, remember this! Next time a client walks into your office think about that and have some serious compassion.
  • Every business is “Show Business” – you must know your audience. Always refer to your customers as guests…different mentality when entertaining guests. Create your own show – act as if you are there to entertain your guests. Your performance is that important. Make it an experience. (Disney created Mickey Mouse Show…among many others) Understand what a customer-centric organization is. Participant-centric learning—if I’m not responsive to your needs, you are not learning. Consider this your orientation into the enhanced customer service experience. Nobody becomes a performer overnight! It will take lots of reminders and practice. You’ll need an action plan. Companies have 2 choices—1. Be profit centered…everything about cost structure and profit 2. Create an experience for our guests/go beyond expectations to fulfill customer dreams (In Disney’s magical kingdom referred to as Magical Moments)
  • Biggest patient concerns… according to David C. Hammer in a 2006 Healthcare Financial Management Association survey. Urgency – be prompt, they are not feeling well… pleasantly find solutions to their problems Uplifting positive experience – friendly, more important for ill patients…they need physical and emotional support Transparency/communication – lack of confusion, jargon, acronyms…don’t confuse patients, explain everything Accessibility – 24/7 easy to contact, answer questions. Make this as easy as you possibly can. Go above and beyond. Simple paperwork - billing / claim process…can be very confusing. Make it simple. Get all the info you need at one time. Educate – awareness, understanding, resources…brochures, websites, personal explanations.
  • Training – teaching the staff your expectations and then holding them accountable. Surveys – what does good customer service mean to them…customer expectations. They may not be willing to speak out as much as they are willing to write it down. Especially if we’re asking them to. ASK! Recognize the value of their input. Thank them for completing it. Hiring – Look for new hires that have customer service experience, personality, serve others before self, have good manners, attitude and get along well with others. Employee Feedback- internal customers can be a good indicator of things you are missing. They interact with patients all the time. Recognize the value of their input. MOST IMPORTANT THING in health care…they are a human beings first, patients second. Treat them how you would want to be treated!
  • Care, Protect and Support - Help them take responsibility for and control over their lives - Provide consultation - Partner with care givers and other organizations they are going to need so you can guide them and answer questions up front Provide standards of commitment Dignity, Privacy/confidentiality, Choice, Safety, Realizing potential, Equality and diversity Give them some thing in writing that they can refer to and then keep your word! Make sure they realize they have potential and you are there to help them achieve it Clarify patient rights – to their information, etcetera Make sure they know what their rights are up front. Provide easy access to services advocacy, information, education, employment Make sure it is real easy for them to access everything they will need to be successful Encourage Feedback - We can’t improve unless we know how to…get to know the client’s needs and expectations and then try to fulfill them and be honest if there are things out of your control. Help them to understand why.
  • The Customer Before you can provide good customer service, you need a good understanding of just who your customer is and how valuable they are. Not how valuable they are today, or this month…their lifetime value.
  • People tend to make negative assumptions about an entire organization based on a single, isolated negative occurrence. Multiple negative occurrences create virtually unbreakable negative pre-dispositions toward us that can devastate our profitability over a period of time. There were some important studies done that show how valuable customers really are and makes us realize why we have to be offering the best service possible.
  • Customer Lifetime Value = average amount one customer might spend over a lifetime. It involves three components: The average dollar amount per transaction The average number of transactions per year The average number of years a customer remains in a business’s primary target group If you work in TANF this might entail the amount of grant money attributable to that client, per visit
  • Example : Assume an average dollar amount per transaction of $13.00, and an average of 22 transactions per year per customer (Kids Corp., 1986 – 1991) The average annual value of a customer, therefore, is $13 x 22 = $286.00. Now assume that the average customer remains in the store’s primary target group for 12 years. The Customer Lifetime Value, therefore, is the annual value, ($286.00), multiplied by 12 years, equaling $3,432.00
  • The Ripple Effect is the impact of a service failure beyond the initial incident. The average customer experiencing a service failure will tell 9-10 people about the experience They will tell only 1/2 as many about service which exceeded their expectations. (Some estimate only 3 people)
  • People avoid businesses they have heard negative things about, and patronize businesses they have heard positive things about. Worst case scenario : a customer has a negative experience, they tell 10 people. All 10 people are also in the primary target group and all 10 choose to avoid the store. The CLV is now multiplied by 11 (the initial customer, plus the ten others). Ripple Effect = the potential cost of a single service failure over a twelve year period is as high as $37,752.00 . It is unlikely, of course, that every negative incident, or even the majority of negative incidents, will result in the worst case scenario. However, failure to address them, or minimize the number of negative incidents has significant consequences. Let’s say a store has 40,000 transactions per year. And a near perfect, service satisfaction rate of 99.5% (which is unlikely), that still represents 200 service failures per year. Worst Case Scenario: The total financial consequences would be 200 x $37,752 or $7.5 million Even with the most conservative numbers you can see how service failures and lack of addressing them can be quite devastating to profitability. If profitability is down…what happens? Analogy: bailing water out of a leaking boat with holes in the bottom. Faster bailing can improve conditions, but faster bailing plus filling in some of the holes will have a much more positive effect.
  • Customers can be either internal or external. Internal customers are any people within the organization who may or may not deal directly with the external customer. However, they provide support, information, products, or services that ultimately are needed by the external customers. Their needs must also be met.
  • Customers can be either internal or external. Internal customers are any people within the organization who may or may not deal directly with the external customer. However, they provide support, information, products, or services that ultimately are needed by the external customers. Their needs must also be met.
  • External customers are any people outside the organization who may or may not use your products or services at the present time. Who else could be considered customers…..??? They also include suppliers, vendors, tribal members and the general public.
  • External customers are any people outside the organization who may or may not use your products or services at the present time. Who else could be considered customers…..??? They also include suppliers, vendors, tribal members and the general public.
  • Who is more important? Both are equally important because they are inter-dependent and vital for the organization’s survival .
  • Who is more important? Both are equally important because they are inter-dependent and vital for the organization’s survival .
  • Customers have needs, desires, and expectations . Needs are the benefits of the product or service that customers must have. Desires are the benefits of the product or service that customers would like to have, but are not essential to their satisfaction. Expectations are formed in the customer’s mind and are the total image of what the product or service would do for him or her. This perception can come from advertising & marketing, the customer’s prior experience, or even the customer’s imagination.
  • Customers have needs, desires, and expectations . Needs are the benefits of the product or service that customers must have. Desires are the benefits of the product or service that customers would like to have, but are not essential to their satisfaction. Expectations are formed in the customer’s mind and are the total image of what the product or service would do for him or her. This perception can come from advertising & marketing, the customer’s prior experience, or even the customer’s imagination.
  • At a minimum, customers expect a customer service provider to be: Reliable — delivering promises on time Responsive — provides courteous help Trustworthy — the provider and the company are honest Be good to your word – If you’re not sure you can keep your word for someone then don’t promise it. Keep your integrity!
  • At a minimum, customers expect a customer service provider to be: Reliable — delivering promises on time Responsive — provides courteous help Trustworthy — the provider and the company are honest Be good to your word – If you’re not sure you can keep your word for someone then don’t promise it. Keep your integrity!
  • At a minimum, customers expect a customer service provider to be: Reliable — delivering promises on time Responsive — provides courteous help Trustworthy — the provider and the company are honest Be good to your word – If you’re not sure you can keep your word for someone then don’t promise it. Keep your integrity!
  • At a minimum, customers expect a customer service provider to be: Reliable — delivering promises on time Responsive — provides courteous help Trustworthy — the provider and the company are honest Be good to your word – If you’re not sure you can keep your word for someone then don’t promise it. Keep your integrity!
  • Being Personal — demonstrates that customers are not just numbers; it means you know them by name Being Professional — knowledgeable and ethical Being Convenient or Offering Convenience — easy to contact — for hours of operations, location, and services offered.
  • Being Personal — demonstrates that customers are not just numbers; it means you know them by name Being Professional — knowledgeable and ethical Being Convenient or Offering Convenience — easy to contact — for hours of operations, location, and services offered.
  • Being Personal — demonstrates that customers are not just numbers; it means you know them by name Being Professional — knowledgeable and ethical Being Convenient or Offering Convenience — easy to contact — for hours of operations, location, and services offered.
  • Being Personal — demonstrates that customers are not just numbers; it means you know them by name Being Professional — knowledgeable and ethical Being Convenient or Offering Convenience — easy to contact — for hours of operations, location, and services offered.
  • Your goal is to provide excellent customer service and to use it as a competitive edge. To do that, it is necessary to transform the ordinary into the extra ordinary . There should be a consistent level of customer service based on the brand promise. “Brand promise” meaning what people have come to expect from the Tribe. The service you get from one smoke shop should be the same as if you went to another Washoe smoke shop. We need to put the customer’s interests first and foremost. It is important that a company strives to develop products and services from a customer’s point of view. Customers’ expectations change, so the company providing the service has to change to stay profitable. For example, the fast food industry had to change its menu offerings because customer’s tastes have changed. That is continuous improvement . You must demonstrate a can-do attitude and work on behalf of the customer. This requires regular training and upgrading of individual skills. Knowing how and understanding why can support a can-do attitude.
  • Who has ever heard of Maslow ' s hierarchy of needs pyramid. This is the basis for the psychology of all human needs. From our most basic needs at the bottom of the pyramid to our most intelligible cravings at the top. Example: the psychology of advertising is designed to appeal to our psychological needs…through the use of the fear of safety or the desire of basic needs. Who can name a brand or an advertisement that appeals to any of these basic needs? How does this relate to our customer service model at the Tribe? Are you thirsty? Have you tried our new sandwiches? Can I interest you in a fresh hot cup of coffee? What is upselling?
  • We can categorize Maslow’s needs into three parts. The first being basic needs…things such as food, water, shelter, safety. The second being the psychological needs, resulting from having brains a bit more advanced than an animal or a dog.
  • Maslow’s Pyramid of Customer Service outlines how the different levels of service meet needs. At the bottom you’ll see how the minimum expectations are met. This is simply survival mode! You are simply satisfying the customer. If you don’t make this level you will not be working in your job very long. At the second level you are being successful. You are meeting more than expectations…you are meeting the desires of the customer, therefore creating loyalty form the customer. The tip of the pyramid is Extraordinary service. You are meeting the customers unrecognized needs. This creates a transformation. You are going above and beyond expectations and will keep customers for life if this level continues.
  • Customers are vital to your company. Remember: Your company is dependent on who?... the customer ; he or she is not dependent on you. The customer is the reason for your work. The customer should be considered a part of your business just like you and your co-workers
  • The customer is not someone to argue or match wits with (so don’t argue ) The customer deserves the most courteous treatment and attentive treatment you can give The customer is the lifeblood of every business   [Conduct “My customers” exercise].
  • The customer is not someone to argue or match wits with (so don’t argue ) The customer deserves the most courteous treatment and attentive treatment you can give The customer is the lifeblood of every business   [Conduct “My customers” exercise].
  • The customer is not someone to argue or match wits with (so don’t argue ) The customer deserves the most courteous treatment and attentive treatment you can give The customer is the lifeblood of every business   [Conduct “My customers” exercise].
  • The customer is not someone to argue or match wits with (so don’t argue ) The customer deserves the most courteous treatment and attentive treatment you can give The customer is the lifeblood of every business   SPEAKERS NOTES : Conduct Exercise #1 “My customers”
  • The customer experience What kind of experience is necessary to have loyal, happy customers or clients and still remain profitable? SPEAKER NOTES: FOR RETAIL ONLY… Refer to “21 tips for Excellent Customer Service”
  • Customers typically leave a business due to poor customer service and not usually due to other things like poor quality or higher price. They come to expect a certain standard from different types of businesses. Wal-Mart = great prices + friendly service. JC Penney = higher prices/higher quality + friendly service. Costco / LL Bean / Zappos…return anything, anytime for full refund or replacement shipping paid both ways. Poor customer service = customers that do not want to return…bad experience. It’s all from a customer’s perspective…
  • Stew Leonard’s Market has a lesson for us. Opened in 1969. Woman complained that Egg Nog was sour. Stew gave her the money back but told her she was crazy! Went home and told his wife…she said he basically called her a liar and they shouldn’t treat any of their customers that way. That’s why they never return to other stores…lack of trust! The customer rule is so important it is etched in a 3-ton granite rock in front of each store. The customer is always right! Stew Leonard’s Fresh Fish Section – fish fresh from the ocean daily! Customer complaint…fish isn’t fresh. Stew was offended but due to prior experience stopped and asked for the customer’s perspective. Could have easily been stubborn and told her the long process they go through… how they get it fresh from the ocean everyday, etc. Instead learned from the customer...”not fresh unless on ice”. Fish sales doubled!
  • There are four components that are critical to a successful customer experience: People who provide the service, Benefits of the products or services, Physical environment and Processes before, during, and after the delivery. These four components are supported and strengthened by the principles of the organization and influence the final outcome.
  • Although all of these components are important, we’re going to focus on how the customer service provider influences the customer’s perception . This involves the way you, the customer service provider, interacts with the customer. People are very complex. People skills are very important so be sure to always practice your people skills.
  • Although all of these components are important, we’re going to focus on how the customer service provider influences the customer’s perception . This involves the way you, the customer service provider, interacts with the customer. People are very complex. People skills are very important so be sure to always practice your people skills.
  • Although all of these components are important, we’re going to focus on how the customer service provider influences the customer’s perception . This involves the way you, the customer service provider, interacts with the customer. People are very complex. People skills are very important so be sure to always practice your people skills.
  • A successful customer experience is made up of several elements. The customer should feel good when the interaction is completed. The experience is successful if the provider: Sincerely makes the customer feel welcome or Welcomes the customer Listens attentively to what the customer is requesting Meets the customer’s needs
  • A successful customer experience is made up of several elements. The customer should feel good when the interaction is completed. The experience is successful if the provider: Sincerely makes the customer feel welcome or Welcomes the customer Listens attentively to what the customer is requesting Meets the customer’s needs
  • A successful customer experience is made up of several elements. The customer should feel good when the interaction is completed. The experience is successful if the provider: Sincerely makes the customer feel welcome or Welcomes the customer Listens attentively to what the customer is requesting Meets the customer’s needs
  • A successful customer experience is made up of several elements. The customer should feel good when the interaction is completed. The experience is successful if the provider: Sincerely makes the customer feel welcome or Welcomes the customer Listens attentively to what the customer is requesting Meets the customer’s needs
  • The experience is also successful if the provider offers the customer additional assistance Respects the customer as a person , not just an anonymous number Thanks the customer for the opportunity to be of service   [Distribute “The Customer Experience” handout]. … use this as a guide – reminder of the elements we’ve just reviewed
  • The experience is also successful if the provider offers the customer additional assistance Respects the customer as a person , not just an anonymous number Thanks the customer for the opportunity to be of service   [Distribute “The Customer Experience” handout]. … use this as a guide – reminder of the elements we’ve just reviewed
  • Delivering an excellent customer experience It is important to deliver excellent service to every customer every time. Why? In some industries a 5% increase in overall customer retention equates to a 25% to 55% increase in the profitability
  • Remember that during communication with a customer, 55% of the impact is conveyed through body language. Positive body language includes: open gestures, nodding, a warm smile, being focused on the customer, eye contact, leaning forward, and grooming
  • Remember that during communication with a customer, 55% of the impact is conveyed through body language. Positive body language includes: open gestures, nodding, a warm smile, being focused on the customer, eye contact, leaning forward, and grooming
  • Thirty-eight percent (38%) of the communication is conveyed with how we speak. The tone of your voice is extremely important. It should be calm, caring, helpful, and enthusiastic.
  • Thirty-eight percent (38%) of the communication is conveyed with how we speak. The tone of your voice is extremely important. It should be calm, caring, helpful, and enthusiastic.
  • Choose words carefully, even if their impact is only seven percent (7%). Use empathetic words and praise, along with saying “yes” and using the customer’s name.
  • Choose words carefully, even if their impact is only seven percent (7%). Use empathetic words and praise, along with saying “yes” and using the customer’s name. SPEAKER NOTES: Distribute flier “Delivering Excellent Customer Service” as a good reminder of these elements of good communication .
  • Each customer interaction can result in excellent service by following a few simple rules. This approach can be used on any customer service situation. First Welcome the customer enthusiastically with a warm smile and good eye contact . Initiate the interaction with a short statement followed by an open-ended question. Who can give me an example of an open-ended question? Try to determine the other person’s communication style. Every person is different and requires different responses. Continue to ask open ended, probing questions until you determine the customer’s real needs.
  • Each customer interaction can result in excellent service by following a few simple rules. This approach can be used on any customer service situation. First Welcome the customer enthusiastically with a warm smile and good eye contact . Initiate the interaction with a short statement followed by an open-ended question. Who can give me an example of an open-ended question? Try to determine the other person’s communication style. Every person is different and requires different responses. Continue to ask open ended, probing questions until you determine the customer’s real needs.
  • Offer the customer various solutions . Explain the benefit of each solution. Then, give additional information to meet customer expectations. Make the ordinary transition extraordinary. The interaction should be memorable for the customer. Always thank the customer at the conclusion of the transaction.   After completing the transaction, review each step of the scenario to make sure you did everything possible to provide good service.
  • Offer the customer various solutions . Explain the benefit of each solution. Then, give additional information to meet customer expectations. Make the ordinary transition extraordinary. The interaction should be memorable for the customer. Always thank the customer at the conclusion of the transaction.   After completing the transaction, review each step of the scenario to make sure you did everything possible to provide good service.
  • Offer the customer various solutions . Explain the benefit of each solution. Then, give additional information to meet customer expectations. Make the ordinary transition extraordinary. The interaction should be memorable for the customer. Always thank the customer at the conclusion of the transaction.   After completing the transaction, review each step of the scenario to make sure you did everything possible to provide good service. SPEAKER NOTE : Motivating Exercise - SERVICE Flash Cards
  • Converting complainers to loyal customers. If there are customers, there will be complaints. It is the employees’ responses to negative incidents, not the incidents themselves, that most often leads to customer dissatisfaction. It can be 30 to 40 times more expensive to acquire new customers than it is to manage existing customers and that is why it is so important that we don’t lose customers.
  • Handout! “Dealing with Customer Complaints”
  • Complaints arise for various reasons such as: ·         the breakdown of a product or service, How does a service breakdown?...minimal or lack of follow-up? ·         a customer’s expectations of the product or service were not met or did not match up to what was actually experienced, ·         the customer did not follow instructions while using the product or service Complaining customers are trying to give you a second chance because they value their relationship with you. Remember…if they didn’t care they wouldn’t bother complaining.
  • Complaints are a test for any organization. The true customer focus and prioritization become evident by how an organization handles complaints. In order to convert a complaining customer into a satisfied customer, as the service provider, you must determine what is necessary to resolve the situation. If you cannot provide what the customer needs, then you must be prepared to offer alternatives . Your company should tell you exactly what you are empowered to do for the customer. Customers, who have had their complaints resolved, strengthen their relationship with an organization. They now know they can depend on and trust the organization. Good service is a great opportunity to convert them from complainers to loyal customers.
  • Complaints are a test for any organization. The true customer focus and prioritization become evident by how an organization handles complaints. In order to convert a complaining customer into a satisfied customer, as the service provider, you must determine what is necessary to resolve the situation. If you cannot provide what the customer needs, then you must be prepared to offer alternatives . Your company should tell you exactly what you are empowered to do for the customer. Customers, who have had their complaints resolved, strengthen their relationship with an organization. They now know they can depend on and trust the organization. Good service is a great opportunity to convert them from complainers to loyal customers.
  • Complaints are a test for any organization. The true customer focus and prioritization become evident by how an organization handles complaints. In order to convert a complaining customer into a satisfied customer, as the service provider, you must determine what is necessary to resolve the situation. If you cannot provide what the customer needs, then you must be prepared to offer alternatives . Your company should tell you exactly what you are empowered to do for the customer. Customers, who have had their complaints resolved, strengthen their relationship with an organization. They now know they can depend on and trust the organization. Good service is a great opportunity to convert them from complainers to loyal customers.
  • Complaints are a test for any organization. The true customer focus and prioritization become evident by how an organization handles complaints. In order to convert a complaining customer into a satisfied customer, as the service provider, you must determine what is necessary to resolve the situation. If you cannot provide what the customer needs, then you must be prepared to offer alternatives . Your company should tell you exactly what you are empowered to do for the customer. Customers, who have had their complaints resolved, strengthen their relationship with an organization. They now know they can depend on and trust the organization. Good service is a great opportunity to convert them from complainers to loyal customers.
  • Are complainers worth the effort? Existing customers are less (what?) expensive than new ones. It is more expensive to get a new customer than to keep an existing one. How much less? The company stands to lose a great deal if it calculates the lifetime value of the customer. A customer’s loyalty increases when complaints are handled properly. Some customers may defect based on price, however, loyal customers value the total relationship. A satisfied customer will speak positively about your company to others. Price shoppers are almost always going to be shopping for the best price. SPEAKER NOTES: Refer to Exercise #2 Complaining Customer Role Play
  • Are complainers worth the effort? Existing customers are less (what?) expensive than new ones. It is more expensive to get a new customer than to keep an existing one. How much less? The company stands to lose a great deal if it calculates the lifetime value of the customer. A customer’s loyalty increases when complaints are handled properly. Some customers may defect based on price, however, loyal customers value the total relationship. A satisfied customer will speak positively about your company to others. Price shoppers are almost always going to be shopping for the best price. SPEAKER NOTES: Refer to Exercise #2 Complaining Customer Role Play
  • Are complainers worth the effort? Existing customers are less (what?) expensive than new ones. It is more expensive to get a new customer than to keep an existing one. How much less? The company stands to lose a great deal if it calculates the lifetime value of the customer. A customer’s loyalty increases when complaints are handled properly. Some customers may defect based on price, however, loyal customers value the total relationship. A satisfied customer will speak positively about your company to others. Price shoppers are almost always going to be shopping for the best price. SPEAKER NOTES: Refer to Exercise #2 Complaining Customer Role Play
  • Complaints come in various levels of intensity and various levels of complexity. Even though each situation is unique there are ways to build an ongoing relationship with customers. When the customer is speaking, let them finish. Listen to the customer. Do not interrupt. Stay calm, and don’t get emotionally involved in the situation.
  • Complaints come in various levels of intensity and various levels of complexity. Even though each situation is unique there are ways to build an ongoing relationship with customers. When the customer is speaking, let them finish. Listen to the customer. Do not interrupt. Stay calm, and don’t get emotionally involved in the situation. Once they are finished then we can attempt to educate them. Now that we have listened to them hopefully they will be willing to listen to our explanation of our processes or service limitations.
  • Now that they are listening it is good to know that there are three primary learning styles. If you want to educate your customer you must appeal to these: Auditory — auditory learners learn best when they are able to listen or hear instructions. 22% of people learn this way . Visual — visual learners learn best when they are able to read or see instructions through means such as images and observing others through demonstration. 29% of people learn this way . Kinesthetic — kinesthetic learners learn best when they are able to touch or have hands-on practice through means such as role playing and other experiential activities. 10% of people learn this way . That’s only 61%...The rest of us learn by combinations of any of the above methods. It is best to take a blended approach and incorporate elements from all of the learning styles since you won’t know how they learn.
  • Active listening, according to Steven Covey, means to “seek first to understand , and then to be understood .” Active listening is the ability to understand what is happening behind what is being said.
  • Active listening, according to Steven Covey, means to “seek first to understand , and then to be understood .” Active listening is the ability to understand what is happening behind what is being said.
  • There are four steps to active listening. Step 1: Paraphrase — When you paraphrase, you repeat back to the speaker a summary of what was said. Step 2: Ask questions — Ask the speaker questions as a way to invite the speaker to elaborate on his or her ideas. Step 3: Use “I” statements — Using “I” statements places the burden of understanding on you rather than on the speaker. Saying to someone, “You’re not making any sense” will likely cause defensiveness. Instead, say “I’m a little confused, could clarify this for me?” Step 4: Monitor body language — Be aware of your body language and the non-verbal message you are sending. Use body language that conveys friendliness, openness, and interest. Monitor
  • What are four steps to active listening again?
  • There are four steps to active listening. Step 1: Paraphrase — When you paraphrase, you repeat back to the speaker a summary of what was said. Step 2: Ask questions — Ask the speaker questions as a way to invite the speaker to elaborate on his or her ideas. Step 3: Use “I” statements — Using “I” statements places the burden of understanding on you rather than on the speaker. Saying to someone, “You’re not making any sense” will likely cause defensiveness. Instead, say “I’m a little confused, could clarify this for me?” Step 4: Monitor body language — Be aware of your body language and the non-verbal message you are sending. Use body language that conveys friendliness, openness, and interest. Monitor
  • There are four steps to active listening. Step 1: Paraphrase — When you paraphrase, you repeat back to the speaker a summary of what was said. Step 2: Ask questions — Ask the speaker questions as a way to invite the speaker to elaborate on his or her ideas. Step 3: Use “I” statements — Using “I” statements places the burden of understanding on you rather than on the speaker. Saying to someone, “You’re not making any sense” will likely cause defensiveness. Instead, say “I’m a little confused, could clarify this for me?” Step 4: Monitor body language — Be aware of your body language and the non-verbal message you are sending. Use body language that conveys friendliness, openness, and interest. Monitor
  • There are four steps to active listening. Step 1: Paraphrase — When you paraphrase, you repeat back to the speaker a summary of what was said. Step 2: Ask questions — Ask the speaker questions as a way to invite the speaker to elaborate on his or her ideas. Step 3: Use “I” statements — Using “I” statements places the burden of understanding on you rather than on the speaker. Saying to someone, “You’re not making any sense” will likely cause defensiveness. Instead, say “I’m a little confused, could clarify this for me?” Step 4: Monitor body language — Be aware of your body language and the non-verbal message you are sending. Use body language that conveys friendliness, openness, and interest. Monitor
  • There are four steps to active listening. Step 1: Paraphrase — When you paraphrase, you repeat back to the speaker a summary of what was said. Step 2: Ask questions — Ask the speaker questions as a way to invite the speaker to elaborate on his or her ideas. Step 3: Use “I” statements — Using “I” statements places the burden of understanding on you rather than on the speaker. Saying to someone, “You’re not making any sense” will likely cause defensiveness. Instead, say “I’m a little confused, could clarify this for me?” Step 4: Monitor body language — Be aware of your body language and the non-verbal message you are sending. Use body language that conveys friendliness, openness, and interest. Monitor
  • There are several barriers that interfere with our ability to practice active listening. These barriers include: Mind reading — This is when you make assumptions or jump to conclusions about what the speaker is thinking or saying. When this happens your focus shifts away from paying attention to what is being said. Interrupting — Active listening requires you to give your time and undivided attention to the speaker. Individuals who interrupt are often more worried about what they are going to say than the message being sent. Rehearsing — You are rehearsing when your energy and attention are focused on what you are going to say next, instead of what the speaker is saying. Filtering — Filtering is listening to only what you want to hear and ignoring the rest of the conversation. Speaker’s Notes : REVISIT Active Listening…Complete worksheet in workbook.
  • What are four steps to active listening again?
  • Apologize. Apologizing doesn’t mean you are at fault. Customers don’t want to hear excuses. They just want to know how their problem is going to be resolved.
  • Provide options and allow the customer to make a decision regarding what is best. Explain in detail to the customer what you are going to do and how you will accomplish it.
  • Provide options and allow the customer to make a decision regarding what is best. Explain in detail to the customer what you are going to do and how you will accomplish it.
  • Always thank the customer for bringing the problem to your attention. Even if the conversation has been emotional, the customer will appreciate a thank you. [Conduct “complaining customer role play”].
  • Always thank the customer for bringing the problem to your attention. Even if the conversation has been emotional, the customer will appreciate a thank you. [Conduct “complaining customer role play”].
  • If only 5 to 10 percent of dissatisfied customers actually take the time to complain 90 to 95 percent of service failures remain unreported
  • After all we’ve learned… consider this. Each complaint typically represents 10-20 unrecovered service failures (Some say 1 complaint = 26 that go unreported!) Each unrecovered service failure can represent as much as $79,200 in lost revenue over twelve years A manager who receives a complaint, therefore, can assume that a single complaint has the potential of representing 10-20 negative incidents…or $792,000 to $1,584,000 in lost revenue over a twelve year period… When a customer complains – take it seriously!
  • After all we’ve learned… consider this. Each complaint typically represents 10-20 unrecovered service failures (Some say 1 complaint = 26 that go unreported!) Each unrecovered service failure can represent as much as $79,200 in lost revenue over twelve years A manager who receives a complaint, therefore, can assume that a single complaint has the potential of representing 10-20 negative incidents…or $792,000 to $1,584,000 in lost revenue over a twelve year period… When a customer complains – take it seriously!
  • Cust Svc Exceeding Exp Ppt

    1. 1. Customer Service Exceeding Expectations—Creating the Service Experience Washoe Tribe of Nevada and California
    2. 2. <ul><li>Customer Service </li></ul><ul><li>Introduction </li></ul>
    3. 3. Specifics Techniques Vary …Basics Stay the Same <ul><li>Customer perspective </li></ul><ul><li>Smile </li></ul><ul><li>Put them first </li></ul><ul><li>Be prompt </li></ul><ul><li>Provide assistance </li></ul>
    4. 4. <ul><li>ATTITUDE </li></ul><ul><li>“ The 90/10 Principle” </li></ul>
    5. 5. ATTITUDE The 90/10 Principle Discover the 90/10 Principle… It will change your life (or at least, the way you react to situations)
    6. 6. <ul><li>What is this 90/10 Principle? </li></ul><ul><li>10% of life is made up of what happens to you. </li></ul><ul><li>… 90% of life is decided by how you react… </li></ul>
    7. 7. <ul><li>What does this mean? </li></ul><ul><li>We really have NO control over 10% of what happens to us. </li></ul>
    8. 8. <ul><li>We cannot stop the car from breaking down. </li></ul><ul><li>A driver may cut us off in traffic. </li></ul>The plane will be arriving late, which throws our whole schedule off.
    9. 9. <ul><li>We have NO control over this 10%. </li></ul><ul><li>The other 90% is different. </li></ul><ul><li>You determine the other 90%. </li></ul><ul><li>How?... </li></ul><ul><li>By your reaction. </li></ul>
    10. 10. <ul><li>You cannot control a red light. </li></ul><ul><li>However, you can control your reaction. </li></ul><ul><li>Do not let people fool you. </li></ul><ul><li>YOU can control how you react. </li></ul><ul><li>Let’s use an example… </li></ul>
    11. 11. <ul><li>You are having breakfast with your family. </li></ul><ul><li>Your daughter knocks over a cup of coffee onto your new shirt. </li></ul>You have no control over what has just happened. What happens next will be determined by how you react.
    12. 12. <ul><li>You curse. </li></ul><ul><li>You harshly scold your daughter for knocking the cup over. </li></ul><ul><li>She breaks down in tears. </li></ul>
    13. 13. <ul><li>After scolding her, you turn to your wife and you criticize her for placing the cup too close to the edge of the table. </li></ul><ul><li>A short verbal battle follows. </li></ul>
    14. 14. <ul><li>You storm into the bedroom to change your shirt. </li></ul><ul><li>Back in the dining room, you find your daughter has been too busy crying to finish her breakfast and get ready for school. </li></ul><ul><li>She misses the bus. </li></ul>
    15. 15. <ul><li>Your spouse must leave immediately for work. </li></ul><ul><li>You rush to the car and drive your daughter to school. </li></ul>Because you are late, you drive 25 miles per hour in a 15 mph school zone.
    16. 16. <ul><li>After a 15-minute delay and getting a $60.00 traffic fine, you arrive at school. </li></ul>Your daughter runs into the building without saying goodbye.
    17. 17. <ul><li>After arriving at the office 20 minutes late, you realize you forgot your briefcase. </li></ul><ul><li>Your day has started terribly. As it continues, it seems to get worse and worse. </li></ul><ul><li>You look forward to coming home. </li></ul>
    18. 18. <ul><li>When you arrive home, you find a small wedge </li></ul><ul><li>in your relationship with your wife and daughter. </li></ul><ul><li>Why? </li></ul><ul><li>Because of how you reacted in the morning . </li></ul>
    19. 19. <ul><li>Why did you have a bad day? </li></ul><ul><li>A) Did the coffee cause it? </li></ul><ul><li>B) Did your daughter cause it? </li></ul><ul><li>C) Did the policeman cause it? </li></ul><ul><li>D) Did you cause it? </li></ul><ul><li>The answer is “D” </li></ul>
    20. 20. <ul><li>You had no control over what happened with the coffee. </li></ul><ul><li>How you reacted in those 5 seconds </li></ul><ul><li>is what caused your bad day. </li></ul><ul><li>Here is what could have and should have happened. </li></ul>
    21. 21. <ul><li>Coffee splashes all over you. </li></ul><ul><li>Your daughter is about to cry. </li></ul><ul><li>You gently say: </li></ul><ul><li>“ It’s okay, honey, you just need to be </li></ul><ul><li>more careful next time.” </li></ul>
    22. 22. <ul><li>You grab your briefcase, and you come back into the dining room just in time to look through the window and see your child getting on the bus. </li></ul>Grabbing a towel you quickly wipe up the mess.
    23. 23. <ul><li>She turns and waves and blows you a kiss. You arrive 5 minutes early and cheerfully greet the staff. </li></ul><ul><li>Notice the difference? </li></ul>
    24. 24. <ul><li>Two different scenarios. </li></ul><ul><li>Both started the same. </li></ul><ul><li>Both ended different. </li></ul><ul><li>Why? </li></ul>
    25. 25. <ul><li>Because of how you reacted. </li></ul><ul><li>You really have no control over 10% of what happens in your life. </li></ul><ul><li>The other 90% was determined by your reaction. </li></ul>
    26. 26. Here are some ways to apply the 90/10 Principle. <ul><li>If someone says something negative about you, do not be a sponge. </li></ul><ul><li>Let the attack roll off like water on glass. </li></ul><ul><li>You do not have to let the negative comments affect you. </li></ul>
    27. 27. <ul><li>React properly and it will not ruin your day. </li></ul><ul><li>A wrong reaction could result in losing a friend, </li></ul><ul><li>being fired, or getting stressed out. </li></ul>
    28. 28. How do you react if someone cuts you off in traffic? <ul><li>Do you lose your temper? </li></ul><ul><li>Pound on the steering wheel? </li></ul><ul><li>Do you curse? Does your blood pressure skyrocket? </li></ul><ul><li>Letting a car in front of you will only cost you a few seconds? </li></ul><ul><li>Why let others ruin your drive? </li></ul>
    29. 29. <ul><li>Remember the 90/10 Principle </li></ul><ul><li>and don’t worry about it. </li></ul><ul><li>Your car broke down… </li></ul><ul><li>Why get stressed and irritated? </li></ul><ul><li>It will work out. </li></ul><ul><li>Instead of stressing or worrying, use your time and energy to fix the problem. </li></ul>
    30. 30. <ul><li>Use your time to read or get to know another passenger, why stress out? </li></ul><ul><li>It will just make things worse. </li></ul>The plane is late. It is going to mangle your schedule for the day. Why take out your frustration on the flight attendant? She has no control over what is going on.
    31. 31. Now you know the 90/10 Principle. <ul><li>Apply it and you will be amazed at the results. </li></ul><ul><li>You will lose nothing if you try it. </li></ul><ul><li>The 90/10 Principle is incredible. </li></ul><ul><li>Very few know and apply this Principle. </li></ul><ul><li>The result? </li></ul><ul><li>You will see it for yourself! </li></ul>
    32. 32. <ul><li>Millions of people are suffering </li></ul><ul><li>from undeserved stress, </li></ul><ul><li>trials, problems and headaches. </li></ul>We all must understand and apply the 90/10 Principle. It can change your life! … Enjoy it...
    33. 33. <ul><li>It only takes willpower to give ourselves permission to make the experience. </li></ul><ul><li>Absolutely everything we do, give, say, or even think, is like a Boomerang. </li></ul><ul><li>It will come back to us... if we want to receive it, we need to learn to give it first... maybe we will end with our hands empty, but our heart will be filled with love... and those who love life, have that feeling marked in their hearts… </li></ul>
    34. 34. Customer service importance <ul><li>Organizations depend on customer loyalty . </li></ul>
    35. 35. Importance of Customer Feedback <ul><li>Involve client/customer as much as possible in discussion and decisions affecting service. </li></ul><ul><li>Provide opportunity for client/customer to comment, make suggestions or complain about service. </li></ul><ul><ul><li>Allows us to pinpoint our weaknesses </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Enables us to make continuous improvements to meet needs and expectations. </li></ul></ul>Costco
    36. 36. Customer service challenges <ul><li>Competitive __________ </li></ul><ul><li>More ________ </li></ul><ul><li>Customers’ needs are ________ </li></ul><ul><li>Customers expect _____ </li></ul>
    37. 37. Customer service challenges <ul><li>Competitive advantage </li></ul><ul><li>More ________ </li></ul><ul><li>Customers’ needs are ________ </li></ul><ul><li>Customers expect _____ </li></ul>
    38. 38. Customer service challenges <ul><li>Competitive advantage </li></ul><ul><li>More choices </li></ul><ul><li>Customers’ needs are ________ </li></ul><ul><li>Customers expect _____ </li></ul>
    39. 39. Customer service challenges <ul><li>Competitive advantage </li></ul><ul><li>More choices </li></ul><ul><li>Customers’ needs are changing </li></ul><ul><li>Customers expect _____ </li></ul>
    40. 40. Customer service challenges <ul><li>Competitive advantage </li></ul><ul><li>More choices </li></ul><ul><li>Customers’ needs are changing </li></ul><ul><li>Customers expect more </li></ul>
    41. 41. Customer service challenges <ul><li>_________ of customers and team members </li></ul><ul><li>_____ culture </li></ul><ul><li>Technology </li></ul>
    42. 42. Customer service challenges <ul><li>Diversity of customers and team members </li></ul><ul><li>_____ culture </li></ul><ul><li>Technology </li></ul>
    43. 43. Customer service challenges <ul><li>Diversity of customers and team members </li></ul><ul><li>Lean culture </li></ul><ul><li>Technology </li></ul>
    44. 44. Becoming the ultimate service provider 10 keys to customer service <ul><li>Big picture thinking </li></ul><ul><li>Positive attitude </li></ul><ul><li>Desire </li></ul><ul><li>Optimism </li></ul><ul><li>Discipline </li></ul><ul><li>Polite persistence </li></ul><ul><li>Sincerity </li></ul><ul><li>Compassion </li></ul><ul><li>Passion </li></ul><ul><li>All the above </li></ul>
    45. 45. Customer Service—The Disney Way <ul><li>Every business is “Show Business” </li></ul><ul><li>Create your show </li></ul><ul><li>Understand customer-centric organization </li></ul><ul><li>Extended orientation </li></ul><ul><li>Develop an action plan to begin your journey </li></ul>
    46. 46. Show Business <ul><li>Everyone has a part in the show </li></ul><ul><li>Guests should feel they’re a part of the show </li></ul><ul><li>Is the show set enhancing the experience? </li></ul><ul><li>Does everyone know how their role contributes to the experience? </li></ul><ul><li>Disney’s #1 rule first day on job -“treat your customers as you would guests in your own home. And never ever refer to them as customers; they are your guests.” </li></ul>
    47. 47. Customer Service—The Disney Way <ul><li>Listen to their dreams/ problems/ needs as if they were guests in your home </li></ul><ul><li>Get their feedback – what is considered exceptional service? </li></ul><ul><li>How easy is it to do business with us? </li></ul><ul><li>Make their perceptions reality. </li></ul>
    48. 48. Customer Service—The Disney Way <ul><li>Disney Success Formula (priorities): </li></ul><ul><li>Begins with the employee </li></ul><ul><li>Quality service for guests </li></ul><ul><li>Quality business experience (profitable) </li></ul>
    49. 49. Health Care Customer Service <ul><li>Biggest patient concerns… </li></ul><ul><li>Urgency – be prompt, find solutions </li></ul><ul><li>Uplifting positive experience - friendly </li></ul><ul><li>Transparency/communication – lack of confusion, jargon, acronyms </li></ul><ul><li>Accessibility – 24/7 easy to contact, answer questions </li></ul><ul><li>Simple paperwork - billing / claim process </li></ul><ul><li>Educate – awareness, understanding, resources </li></ul><ul><ul><li>* 2006 Healthcare Financial Management Association – David C. Hammer </li></ul></ul>
    50. 50. Health Care Customer Service <ul><li>How to improve it… </li></ul><ul><li>Training </li></ul><ul><li>Surveys </li></ul><ul><li>Hiring </li></ul><ul><li>Employee Feedback </li></ul>
    51. 51. Customer Service for Social Workers <ul><li>Care, Protect and Support </li></ul><ul><ul><li>- Help them take responsibility for and control over their lives </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>- Provide consultation </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>- Partnerships with care givers, other organizations </li></ul></ul><ul><li>Provide standards of commitment </li></ul><ul><ul><li>- Dignity, Privacy/confidentiality, Choice, Safety, Realizing potential, Equality and diversity </li></ul></ul><ul><li>Clarify patient rights – to their information, etcetera </li></ul><ul><li>Provide easy access to services </li></ul><ul><ul><li>- advocacy, information, education, employment </li></ul></ul><ul><li>Encourage Feedback </li></ul><ul><ul><li>- improvement through meeting needs and expectations </li></ul></ul>
    52. 52. <ul><li>The Customer </li></ul>
    53. 53. Lost Customer: Potential Cost Due To Service Failure <ul><li>Two factors involved in calculating the potential cost of a lost customer due to service failure: </li></ul><ul><ul><li>a. The average Customer Lifetime Value (CLV) </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>b. The ripple effect </li></ul></ul>
    54. 54. Lost Customer: CLV <ul><li>Customer Lifetime Value = average amount one customer/client is worth over a lifetime. It involves three components: </li></ul><ul><ul><li>The average dollar amount per transaction/visit </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>The average number of visits/transactions per year </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>The average number of years a customer/client remains in a business’s primary target group </li></ul></ul>
    55. 55. Lost Customer: CLV <ul><li>Example : </li></ul><ul><li>Assume an average dollar amount per transaction/visit of $50.00, and an average of 12 visits per year per client. The average annual value of a customer, therefore, is $50 x 12 or $600.00 per year. </li></ul><ul><li>Now assume that the average customer/client remains in the store’s primary target group for 12 years. The Customer Lifetime Value, therefore, is the annual value, ($600.00), multiplied by 12 years, equaling $7,200.00 </li></ul>
    56. 56. Lost Customer: Ripple Effect <ul><li>The Ripple Effect is the impact of a service failure beyond the initial incident. </li></ul><ul><li>The average customer experiencing a service failure will tell 9-10 people about the experience </li></ul><ul><li>They will tell only 1/2 as many about service which exceeded their expectations. </li></ul>
    57. 57. Lost Customer: Ripple Effect <ul><li>People avoid businesses they have heard negative things about, and patronize businesses they have heard positive things about. </li></ul><ul><li>Worst case scenario : a customer has a negative experience, they tell 10 people. All 10 people are also in the primary target group and all 10 choose to avoid the store. The CLV is now multiplied by 11 ( the initial customer, plus the ten others ). </li></ul><ul><li>Ripple Effect = the potential cost of a single service failure over a twelve year period is as high as $79,200.00 . </li></ul>
    58. 58. Internal & external customers <ul><li>Internal Customers </li></ul><ul><ul><li>anyone ________ the organization </li></ul></ul>
    59. 59. Internal & external customers <ul><li>Internal Customers </li></ul><ul><ul><li>anyone within the organization </li></ul></ul>
    60. 60. Internal & external customers <ul><li>External Customers </li></ul><ul><ul><li>anyone _______ the organization </li></ul></ul>
    61. 61. Internal & external customers <ul><li>External Customers </li></ul><ul><ul><li>anyone outside the organization </li></ul></ul>
    62. 62. Internal & external customers <ul><li>Equally important and ______ to organization’s _________. </li></ul>
    63. 63. Internal & external customers <ul><li>Equally important and vital to organization’s survival . </li></ul>
    64. 64. Clients/Customers <ul><li>Needs </li></ul><ul><li>Desires </li></ul><ul><li>___________ </li></ul>
    65. 65. Clients/Customers <ul><li>Needs </li></ul><ul><li>Desires </li></ul><ul><li>Expectations </li></ul>
    66. 66. Importance of Customer Expectations <ul><li>Make a commitment to the client/customer and to yourself </li></ul><ul><li>Keep a standard your client/customer will come to expect </li></ul><ul><li>Provide support and answer questions whenever necessary </li></ul><ul><ul><li>Provide full explanations and use active listening to make sure your message is clear </li></ul></ul>
    67. 67. Expectations <ul><li>Customer expectations: </li></ul><ul><ul><li>Re_______ </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Re__________ </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>T____________ </li></ul></ul>
    68. 68. Expectations <ul><li>Customer expectations: </li></ul><ul><ul><li>Re liable </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Re__________ </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>T____________ </li></ul></ul>
    69. 69. Expectations <ul><li>Customer expectations: </li></ul><ul><ul><li>Re liable </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Re sponsive </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>T____________ </li></ul></ul>
    70. 70. Expectations <ul><li>Customer expectations: </li></ul><ul><ul><li>Re liable </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Re sponsive </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>T rustworthy </li></ul></ul>
    71. 71. Expectations <ul><li>Customer expectations </li></ul><ul><ul><li>P________ </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>P___________ </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>C__________ </li></ul></ul>
    72. 72. Expectations <ul><li>Customer expectations </li></ul><ul><ul><li>P ersonal </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>P___________ </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>C__________ </li></ul></ul>
    73. 73. Expectations <ul><li>Customer expectations </li></ul><ul><ul><li>P ersonal </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>P rofessional </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>C__________ </li></ul></ul>
    74. 74. Expectations <ul><li>Customer expectations </li></ul><ul><ul><li>P ersonal </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>P rofessional </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>C onvenience </li></ul></ul>
    75. 75. How to exceed expectations <ul><li>Transform ordinary to extra ordinary </li></ul><ul><li>Consistency of service </li></ul><ul><li>Keep client/customers’ interests first </li></ul><ul><li>Continuous improvement </li></ul><ul><li>Positive “can-do” attitude </li></ul><ul><li>Training </li></ul>
    76. 76. Maslow ' s hierarchy of needs pyramid
    77. 77. Maslow ' s hierarchy of needs pyramid
    78. 78. Maslow’s Pyramid of Customer Service Create Evangelism Create Loyalty Create Satisfaction
    79. 79. Customers <ul><li>Company is dependent on the customer </li></ul><ul><li>They are the reason for your work </li></ul><ul><li>They are part of the business </li></ul>
    80. 80. Customers <ul><li>Don’t _____ with them </li></ul><ul><li>Deserve c _______ treatment </li></ul><ul><li>They are the l ______ of the business </li></ul>
    81. 81. Customers <ul><li>Don’t Argue with them </li></ul><ul><li>Deserve c _______ treatment </li></ul><ul><li>They are the l ______ of the business </li></ul>
    82. 82. Customers <ul><li>Don’t Argue with them </li></ul><ul><li>Deserve c ourteous treatment </li></ul><ul><li>They are the l ______ of the business </li></ul>
    83. 83. Customers <ul><li>Don’t Argue with them </li></ul><ul><li>Deserve c ourteous treatment </li></ul><ul><li>They are the l ifeblood of the business </li></ul>
    84. 84. <ul><li>The Customer Experience </li></ul>
    85. 85. From the Heart <ul><li>Serve your customers from the heart </li></ul><ul><li>Make each customer’s day special </li></ul><ul><li>Treat them like guests in your home </li></ul><ul><li>Find new creative ways to engage them </li></ul><ul><li>Always continue to improve your process </li></ul><ul><li>Listen to your customers </li></ul><ul><li>Become a problem solver </li></ul><ul><li>Revisit your vision, values </li></ul><ul><li>Create an environment where mutual respect and trust abound, so people know they are respected and trusted </li></ul><ul><li>Create a physical environment that complements the experience </li></ul>
    86. 86. Why Customers Leave Seek out Customer’s Perspective!
    87. 87. Stew Leonard’s Lesson on Customer Service <ul><li>Egg-Nog story </li></ul><ul><li>TRUST…&quot;Rule #1 –The Customer is Always Right&quot;; Rule #2 – If the Customer is Ever Wrong, Re-Read Rule #1.&quot; </li></ul><ul><li>This principle is so essential to the foundation of the company that it is etched in a three-ton granite rock in front of each store. </li></ul><ul><li>“ Fresh” Fish story - customer perspective </li></ul>
    88. 88. Critical components of a customer experience <ul><li>Service providers </li></ul><ul><li>Benefits of products </li></ul><ul><li>Physical environment </li></ul><ul><li>Processes </li></ul>
    89. 89. Interaction <ul><li>Customer service influences customer ___________ </li></ul><ul><li>________ skills are very important </li></ul>
    90. 90. Interaction <ul><li>Customer service influences customer perception </li></ul><ul><li>________ skills are very important </li></ul>
    91. 91. Interaction <ul><li>Customer service influences customer perception </li></ul><ul><li>People skills are very important </li></ul>
    92. 92. Customer experience <ul><li>W_______ the customer </li></ul><ul><li>L_______ attentively </li></ul><ul><li>Meet n_____ </li></ul>
    93. 93. Customer experience <ul><li>W elcome the customer </li></ul><ul><li>L_______ attentively </li></ul><ul><li>Meet n_____ </li></ul>
    94. 94. Customer experience <ul><li>W elcome the customer </li></ul><ul><li>L isten attentively </li></ul><ul><li>Meet n_____ </li></ul>
    95. 95. Customer experience <ul><li>W elcome the customer </li></ul><ul><li>L isten attentively </li></ul><ul><li>Meet n eeds </li></ul>
    96. 96. Customer experience <ul><li>Offers assistance </li></ul><ul><li>Respects as person </li></ul><ul><li>T____s the customer </li></ul>
    97. 97. Customer experience <ul><li>Offers assistance </li></ul><ul><li>Respects as person </li></ul><ul><li>T hank s the customer </li></ul>
    98. 98. <ul><li>Delivering an Excellent Customer Experience </li></ul>
    99. 99. Communication impact <ul><li>Body Language - __% </li></ul><ul><ul><li>open gestures </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>nodding </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>warm smile </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>focus </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>eye contact </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>leaning forward </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>grooming </li></ul></ul>
    100. 100. Communication impact <ul><li>Body Language - 55 % </li></ul><ul><ul><li>open gestures </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>nodding </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>warm smile </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>focus </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>eye contact </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>leaning forward </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>grooming </li></ul></ul>
    101. 101. Communication impact <ul><li>How we speak – __% </li></ul><ul><ul><li>calm, </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>caring, </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>helpful, </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>enthusiastic </li></ul></ul>
    102. 102. Communication impact <ul><li>How we speak – 38 % </li></ul><ul><ul><li>calm, </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>caring, </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>helpful, </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>enthusiastic </li></ul></ul>
    103. 103. Communication impact <ul><li>Words we use – _% </li></ul><ul><ul><li>empathy </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>praise </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>yes </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>customer name </li></ul></ul>
    104. 104. Communication impact <ul><li>Words we use – 7 % </li></ul><ul><ul><li>empathy </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>praise </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>yes </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>customer name </li></ul></ul>
    105. 105. Excellent Service <ul><li>Welcome </li></ul><ul><li>Communication style </li></ul><ul><li>O___-_____ question </li></ul>
    106. 106. Excellent Service <ul><li>Welcome </li></ul><ul><li>Communication style </li></ul><ul><li>O pen - ended question </li></ul>
    107. 107. Excellent service <ul><li>Offer s_______ </li></ul><ul><li>Always t____ them </li></ul><ul><li>Review scenario </li></ul>
    108. 108. Excellent service <ul><li>Offer s olutions </li></ul><ul><li>Always t____ them </li></ul><ul><li>Review scenario </li></ul>
    109. 109. Excellent service <ul><li>Offer s olutions </li></ul><ul><li>Always t hank them </li></ul><ul><li>Review scenario </li></ul>
    110. 110. <ul><li>Converting complainers to loyal customers </li></ul>
    111. 111. Why customers leave organizations Why Customers Leave Poor Customer Service
    112. 112. Dealing with Customer Complaints <ul><li>Listen – never interrupt the customer </li></ul><ul><li>Be open – don’t assume the customer is wrong until you hear what they have to say </li></ul><ul><li>Don’t resist – </li></ul><ul><ul><li>Bad Comments </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><ul><li>I don’t know what we can do about that. </li></ul></ul></ul><ul><ul><ul><li>I’m not sure if we can help you. </li></ul></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Good Comments </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><ul><li>I’m sorry you’ve experienced this problem. </li></ul></ul></ul><ul><ul><ul><li>Let me get some more information so we can get this resolved. </li></ul></ul></ul>You and the complaining customer both want the same thing… to resolve the problem!
    113. 113. Dealing with Customer Complaints <ul><li>Identify the problem – get clarification using open ended questions </li></ul><ul><li>Be empathetic – “I know how you feel” – it provides reassurance </li></ul><ul><li>Apologize – acknowledgement develops trust and confidence </li></ul><ul><li>Ask how you can resolve the problem </li></ul><ul><ul><li>What they want might be much simpler than what you thought </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Be creative - Turn the problem into the solution (Stew Leonard’s Fresh Fish) </li></ul></ul><ul><li>Be prompt – if you have empowerment the more likely the customer is satisfied </li></ul><ul><ul><li>Prolonging the resolution creates frustration </li></ul></ul>
    114. 114. Dealing with Customer Complaints <ul><li>Keep the customer informed – update them on the progress of the resolution </li></ul><ul><li>Be very clear about the resolution </li></ul><ul><ul><li>Don’t leave out a single detail </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Meet expectations as a minimum </li></ul></ul><ul><li>Future customer service </li></ul><ul><ul><li>Problem will be eliminated in future </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Provides reassurance – makes them feel important </li></ul></ul><ul><li>Say Thank You </li></ul><ul><li>Follow-up </li></ul>
    115. 115. Complaints <ul><li>Breakdown of product or service </li></ul><ul><li>Expectations not met </li></ul><ul><li>Customer didn’t follow instructions </li></ul>
    116. 116. Complaints <ul><li>Resolve the situation </li></ul><ul><ul><li>Provide what is requested </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Offer a________ </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Strengthen r__________ </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>C_______ the complainer </li></ul></ul>
    117. 117. Complaints <ul><li>Resolve the situation </li></ul><ul><ul><li>Provide what is requested </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Offer a lternatives </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Strengthen r__________ </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>C_______ the complainer </li></ul></ul>
    118. 118. Complaints <ul><li>Resolve the situation </li></ul><ul><ul><li>Provide what is requested </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Offer a lternatives </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Strengthen r elationship </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>C_______ the complainer </li></ul></ul>
    119. 119. Complaints <ul><li>Resolve the situation </li></ul><ul><ul><li>Provide what is requested </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Offer a lternatives </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Strengthen r elationship </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>C onvert the complainer </li></ul></ul>
    120. 120. Are complainers worth the effort? <ul><li>Existing customer are less ________ than new ones </li></ul><ul><li>Increases _____ </li></ul>
    121. 121. Are complainers worth the effort? <ul><li>Existing customer are less expensive than new ones </li></ul><ul><li>Increases _____ </li></ul>
    122. 122. Are complainers worth the effort? <ul><li>Existing customer are less expensive than new ones </li></ul><ul><li>Increases loyalty </li></ul>
    123. 123. Building relationships <ul><li>L____ to the customer </li></ul>
    124. 124. Building relationships <ul><li>L isten to the customer </li></ul>
    125. 125. Primary Learning Styles <ul><li>A uditory </li></ul><ul><li>V isual </li></ul><ul><li>K inesthetic </li></ul><ul><li>Don’t know?—take a blended approach </li></ul>
    126. 126. Active Listening Means… “ Seek first to _____________ , then to be _____________ .” Stephen R. Covey
    127. 127. Active Listening Means… “ Seek first to understand , then to be understood .” Stephen R. Covey
    128. 128. 4 Steps to Active Listening Step 4— Monitor body language Step 3— Use “I” statements Step 2— Ask questions Step 1— Paraphrase
    129. 129. 4 Steps to Active Listening Step 4— Step 3— Step 2— Step 1—
    130. 130. 4 Steps to Active Listening Step 4— Step 3— Step 2— Step 1— Paraphrase
    131. 131. 4 Steps to Active Listening Step 4— Step 3— Step 2— Ask questions Step 1— Paraphrase
    132. 132. 4 Steps to Active Listening Step 4— Step 3— Use “I” statements Step 2— Ask questions Step 1— Paraphrase
    133. 133. 4 Steps to Active Listening Step 4— Monitor body language Step 3— Use “I” statements Step 2— Ask questions Step 1— Paraphrase
    134. 134. Barriers to Active Listening <ul><li>Mind reading </li></ul><ul><li>Interrupting </li></ul><ul><li>Rehearsing </li></ul><ul><li>Filtering </li></ul>
    135. 135. 4 Steps to Active Listening Step 4— Step 3— Step 2— Step 1—
    136. 136. Building relationships <ul><li>Apologize </li></ul><ul><ul><li>Don't make excuses </li></ul></ul>
    137. 137. Building relationships <ul><li>Provide o_____ </li></ul>
    138. 138. Building relationships <ul><li>Provide o ptions </li></ul>
    139. 139. Building relationships <ul><li>Always th____ the customer </li></ul>
    140. 140. Building relationships <ul><li>Always th ank the customer </li></ul>
    141. 141. After all we’ve learned… consider this. <ul><li>If only 5 to 10 percent of dissatisfied customers actually take the time to complain </li></ul><ul><li>90 to 95 percent of service failures remain unreported </li></ul>
    142. 142. After all we’ve learned… consider this. <ul><li>Each complaint typically represents 10-20 unrecovered service failures </li></ul><ul><li>Each unrecovered service failure can represent as much as $79,200 in lost revenue over twelve years </li></ul>
    143. 143. After all we’ve learned… consider this. <ul><li>A manager who receives a complaint, therefore, can assume that a single complaint has the potential of representing 10-20 negative incidents…or </li></ul><ul><li>$792,000 to $1,584,000 in lost revenue over a twelve year period </li></ul><ul><li>When a customer complains – take it seriously! </li></ul>
    144. 144. <ul><li>Please be sure to complete and leave the evaluation sheet you received with your handouts. </li></ul><ul><li>Thank you for your attention and interest! </li></ul>

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