Organizing  fund raising and charity benefit events
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Organizing fund raising and charity benefit events

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How to successfully plan and organize local fundraising events and charity benefits: a practical checklist for organizing events, compiled by Dean Amory

How to successfully plan and organize local fundraising events and charity benefits: a practical checklist for organizing events, compiled by Dean Amory

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Organizing  fund raising and charity benefit events Organizing fund raising and charity benefit events Document Transcript

  • HOW TO SUCCESSFULLY PLAN AND ORGANIZE EVENTS Compiled by Dean AmoryCHECKLIST FOR ORGANIZING LOCAL FUNDRAISING EVENTS AND CHARITY BENEFITS
  • Title of book: HOW TO SUCCESSFULLY PLAN AND ORGANIZE EVENTS(CHECKLIST FOR ORGANIZING LOCAL FUNDRAISING EVENTS AND CHARITY BENEFITS)Author: Dean AmoryCopyright © 2012, Edgard Adriaens,ISBN CODE: 978-1-291-14675-2First Printing: October 2012Published by Edgard AdriaensDean_Amory@hotmail.comCover design by Edgard AdriaensBook design by Edgard AdriaensAll rights reserved.No part of this book may be reproduced in any form or by any electronic or mechanical meansincluding information storage and retrieval systems, without permission in writing from the author.The only exception is by a reviewer, who may quote short excerpts in a review.Dean amory Visit my website at http://www.lulu.com/spotlight/Jaimelavie 2
  • INDEXVisit my website at http://www.lulu.com/spotlight/Jaimelavie.......................................................2INDEX..............................................................................................................................................3DECESIVE FACTORS FOR THE SUCCESS OF YOUR EVENT...............................................4PREPARATION...............................................................................................................................5 ...............................................................................................................................................................5 1.1. Decide on the goal for the event.....................................................................................................6 ...............................................................................................................................................................6 1.2. Determine the type of event you will organize. ............................................................................7 ...............................................................................................................................................................8 1.3. Examine practical and legal consequences of your choice............................................................9 .............................................................................................................................................................10 1.4. Organize a Team..........................................................................................................................11 1.5. Design a definitive plan for your event. ......................................................................................13 1.6. Date and Time .............................................................................................................................14 1.7. Location........................................................................................................................................15 1.8. Logistics.......................................................................................................................................16 1.9. Staffing or Volunteers..................................................................................................................17 1.10. Risk assessment..........................................................................................................................18 1.11. Invitations...................................................................................................................................22 1.12. Publicity and printing.................................................................................................................23 1.13. Your Costs..................................................................................................................................25 1.14. The Speaker ...............................................................................................................................26 1.15. Entertainment. ...........................................................................................................................27WORK TO BE DONE 1 TO 2 WEEKS BEFORE THE EVENT.................................................28WORK TO BE DONE 2 TO 3 DAYS BEFORE THE EVENT....................................................29THE DAY OF THE EVENT..........................................................................................................31AFTER THE EVENT.....................................................................................................................35 Communication with Partners.............................................................................................................35 .............................................................................................................................................................35 Report to the Public.............................................................................................................................36 Administration.....................................................................................................................................37........................................................................................................................................................37A SHANTY TOWN NAMED CLARA ZETKIN.........................................................................38Sources:..........................................................................................................................................40 3
  • DECESIVE FACTORS FOR THE SUCCESS OF YOUR EVENTVery much as with any project, the success of your event stands or falls with the quality of itspreparation and overall organization.Yet also other factors, such as the type of event, the timing, the location and your capacity to surroundyourself with a qualified and committed team are of paramount importance for assuring a goodoutcome.This practical manual will guide you through the various stages of the planning and organizationalprocess.However, a warning is in place here: Although a good checklist is essential for the efficient planningand organization of events, even the most perfect handout cannot replace the effect of local socialsupport to your initiative.If you have organized fund raising events in support of local sports teams, youth organizations or thecommunity school, you will have encountered little trouble in recruiting team members, and findingvolunteers, sponsors and participants.On the other hand, if your goal is to raise money for people surviving in degrading circumstances in anobscure shanty town in some distant country, the field suddenly becomes a lot harder to play. Becausepeople do not feel personally connected to your cause, they will come up with all kinds of pretexts inorder not to have to participate. Potential volunteers will suddenly remember a previous engagement,sponsors will regretfully inform you they have no budget left at this time of the year and the objectsraised by the targeted audience will range from health problems and carefully formulated doubts aboutthe good use of the money, to straightforward racist remarks.Therefore, the less popular the cause, the more importance should be paid to the quality of the otherfactors which might tilt the balance in your favor: A popular type of event, an original and inspiringtheme, outstanding performers, rock hard credentials, reputed sponsors, patronage or public supportfrom high pitched and well regarded public figures, local goodwill built over the years through a wellknown and appreciated personal engagement in other fields, access to volunteers through collaborationwith other local organizations, …Either way however, organizing an event implies hard and uninterrupted work from a dedicated teamand requires excellent interpersonal and communicative skills from the coordinator. More so becauseboth team members and volunteers are cooperating on a voluntary basis and therefore not likely toaccept being ordered about or being assigned tasks that they cannot easily personalize with. 4
  • PREPARATION 5
  • 1.1. Decide on the goal for the event.A special event is a one-time event focused on a specific purpose.Be sure do some strategizing and set goals before you begin. What is your mission? What is yourstrategy? How will an event fit with your strategy and other tactics? What specific goals do you wantthe event to achieve?Make sure the purpose for the event and the goals set are important enough to merit the time andexpense needed to properly stage, publicize and evaluate the event.How will you measure the success of your event? How much money do you expect to make?Other measurable event objectives may include attendance, number of entry tickets sold, value ofsponsorship raised,How will the goal be reached?What will the money be used for?How will it be transferred? 6
  • 1.2. Determine the type of event you will organize.Have a brainstorming session to collect ideas.Be aware of the competition and research your ideas and the market:When choosing an event, make sure that it is a popular attraction that will bring in the types of peopleyou are hoping to attract.What are other organizations doing to raise funds for their projects?Which events are working? Which not? Why?Have other organizations recently run similar events? What was the outcome?Is their sufficient financial gain in running this particular event?1.2.1. If you are looking for a smaller amount, try:A bake sale (cakes, cookies, waffles, pies, …)Selling fruits, flowers, calendars, candy or items for your home,Competition (singing contest, dancing competition, poetry reading, beauty pageant, race, chess, cardgames night, football knockout competition,…),Garage sale (clothes, household items, toys, …),Craft fair (painting exhibition, home made cards, books, handwork, …)Car Wash (with extra services like vacuuming and waxing at additional cost),Auction,Raffle (Get the main price(s) for free from a local sponsor!),Eating at a restaurant that will donate a percentage (generally 20%) of the sales to your charity,Walk-a-thonQuiz-nightFashion showCookery demonstration by a well known chefHair and beauty hints and tips eveningDancing display by local dance school 7
  • In general: if third parties participate, a percentage of their sales should go to your charity(fashion show, sale of paintings, handwork, …)1.2.2. Larger amounts can use many different types of fundraising included into the bigger event. Try:Wine or food tasting event,Concert,Themed music night (e.g. classical, folk, …)Picnic and music in the grounds of a mansion or castleFancy ball, traditional dance and food evening,Dinner and entertainment or a style show,Golf tournament.Art shows and dinner at your local art museum are some of the most favorite fund raisers.Silent auctionRaffleStraight out donations or pledges. 8
  • 1.3. Examine practical and legal consequences of your choice.Each choice raises different logistical issuesIf youre doing a silent auction, youll obviously need donated artworks.If its a music-related event, someone must contact top-drawing local performers, who typically bookseveral months in advance.You will need commitments from the chosen venue, and from the participating performers. The morecomplicated the event, the farther ahead you need to plan; two to six months is considered the norm.Below are some legal requirements which have to be considered: - Nomination of named organizer whose name will figure on all official documents, - Fire precaution and safety plan, - Permission for door to door sale of tickets, - Permission to organize a raffle, - Permission for sale of alcohol, - Rights due for playing music, - Prevention of public nuisance, crime and disorder, - Public liability insurance - 9
  • 10
  • 1.4. Organize a Team.Consider how many volunteers are required.For example, a straightforward auction or raffle only needs a handful of people to take money, and callout prizes. The numbers multiply exponentially if youre planning a gala with elaborate meals anddrinks, which must be set up, serviced, and broken down again.Good team members with different skills are a necessity. They can help with everything frompreparing schedules and budgets, to making invites and posters. They can help you get things doneBefore you set out to recruit team members, create a provisional budget and a provisional plan of thebenefit informing them of what you are asking them for and providing them with a financial blueprintof the event.Recruit a committee of friends, coworkers and business acquaintances to handle the event.Create a committee that will lead the efforts for your fundraising benefit. Then determine the necessarysubcommittees that will be responsible for certain areas of the whole plan - for example ticket sales,entertainment, gift solicitation and promotions. Decide how many people should be involved in eachsubcommittee.Dont be afraid to delegate authority.Choose a chair person to manage your event. This person will organize your benefit and be the maincontact. A chair person is needed to guide the planning of this event and see it to fruition.Assign each person or group to a specific task. Allocate someone to collect entry forms, takeresponsibility for incoming money and payments due, bank money, send out information toparticipants, register participants, write out certificates, sign sponsor forms, send out letter of thanks,keep and analyze the budget, monitor and evaluate needs to be carried out, maintain press relations, etc…While youre engaged in those tasks, start looking for volunteers, who can come from family membersand friends.Corporate sponsors may be willing to support your event, especially if you can convince them thatthey can get good publicity, generate goodwill and associate with a worthy cause. Seek sponsors tohelp absorb the costs associated with the benefit, from door prizes to food and publicity, or hugeoverhead costs will eat up whatever funds you raise. Some sponsors will swap services in return for aplug. Follow up on that promise, if you plan on making it.Try to settle your committee, sponsor and venue lineup within the first couple of weeks of organizing.Schedule regular meetings to discuss the progress of the event. Expect weekly meetings with the coreteam to keep track of the planning, and head off any last-minute, sticky issues. Meeting periodicallywill allow the chair to confirm that everything is going to plan. Additionally, it will offer committeemembers an opportunity to get together and be updated on their peer committee progressSet up a time table and list when each item should be finished. 11
  • Prepare a list with all relevant mobile, phone numbers, emails ids of team members. Also, make asimilar contact list for VIP, and supplier of any goods or services.Keep detailed records of every thing you do.After the event, make notes as to what worked well and what can be improved upon. This will be yourguide for the next time.Sit down with your committee after the event to discuss what worked, or didnt. Even if the benefit wasonly a one-off, it never hurts to revisit things. Youll never know if you have to organize a similarevent for someone else. Follow through with your sponsors, and dont be afraid to get their feedback,while youre at it.Thank your volunteers and sponsors by sending out cards, a summary letter, or special dinner. Afterall, you want to recognize people for the hard work and support they gave in making your eventsuccessful.Post the final details on your website, including how much money was raised, how the beneficiaryfared, and - if you created an ongoing event - details that future volunteers and sponsors need to knowin gearing up for next year. 12
  • 1.5. Design a definitive plan for your event .Get a firm commitment from all the team members. If alternative projects are brought forward at theinitial meeting, don’t discard them off hand. Ask why the alternative is brought up: Are there reasonswhy your idea might not be the best way to raise funds?Once the goal and type of benefit are fixed, brainstorm for an appropriate nameLay out all the areas of the benefit planning stage in order to ensure that you dont miss anything.Your plan should cover all areas of the benefit, from the subcommittee assignments to venuerequirements.Your plan should also include a timeline that takes you from the beginning of the planning stage to theend in chronological order.It is important to make sure administrative actions are being taken care of as well. Things like pooraccounting, and lack of correspondence can create problems for any event. 13
  • 1.6. Date and TimeSchedule the event at a time when there will not be too many other things happening.Summer is when many charities hold their events.Try something formal, late February or March. 14
  • 1.7. Location.Unless your event occurs online, youll need a venue to host it.The location is vital: your event will be weighed by the nature and prestige of your venue!The type of location depends on the goal and nature of the event.Selecting a well known, official hall (library, cultural center, school hall, …) has consequences whichmay prove to be an advantage or a disadvantage.Elements to consider are: - How well-known is the location with the target audience? - Is it accessible to everybody? (both young and old? Selecting a youth-club for instance, will primarily draw young people) - Is it considered politically neutral ground? - Logistics: presence of kitchen, bar, sound-system, didactic attributes (beamer, micros, …) - Presence of a stage, sufficient chairs, tables, cutlery, … - How about power points, light and heating? - What are the possibilities for (wall) decoration? - Assistance available? (e.g. in case of problems with sound system, electricity, kitchen …) - Presence of toilets & toilet-paper - Presence of beverages – permission to serve own cocktails or wine? - Access to the location: when and where will you receive / return the key? - Arrangements for cleaning and washing upMake a shortlist of three or four choicesThe location should be handicap accessible.It should be easy to find and have easy access. - Include a map and directions with the invitations andall advertisements.Take in other factors that affect attendance such as proximity to public transportation and parkingfacilities.Visit the venue with your team members, look around the place including parking, toilets, greenrooms, contact person, arrangements, various entrances and exits. Look for nearby places where youcan take photocopy, make phone calls, buy any things in case of emergency.If the event is being held outdoors you should consider the possibility of bad weather: - How will bad weather impact the activities planned? - What may be the impact on the success of the event? - What provisions are required to shelter the audience? - Are the car park, footpaths, staging and other structures suitable for use in bad weather conditions? 15
  • 1.8. Logistics.Gather items needed for the event. These items might include medals, games, mementos, prizes, orcertificates.Make arrangements for photos, videos etc.Make arrangements for food and refreshments. This is also a good time to prepare for specialaccommodation such as for those who have disabilities etc. Check participants who are vegetarian.Make arrangements for chairs, tables, backdrops, microphones, speakers, computers, LCD projectors,podiums to be set up at the venue. 16
  • 1.9. Staffing or Volunteers.Who will staff the benefit? Paid people or volunteers?Staffing the event is extremely important.Unless if handled by paid staff, make sure to use volunteers who have been volunteering for a longperiod of time. One miss spoken work or action could be costly. 17
  • 1.10. Risk assessment.The separate parts to the risk assessment are shown below: - Identify the hazards associated with the event i.e. anything that can cause harm. (You can look at specific publications, visiting the site or venue and obtaining details of specific hazards from contractors, catering outlets and suppliers of special effects etc). - Decide who may be harmed and how - Assess the level of risk - Identify appropriate and adequate precautions;Record your findings.The overall event risk assessment will help to determine what controls or precautions you need to putinto place to manage the event safely. This should include planning, communicating and practicingyour emergency procedures. It is strongly recommended that every event is risk assessed, whether thelaw says it should be or not.Slip, trip, fall and other similar hazards should be considered and addressed as part of the riskassessment.Seek early approval from local authorities if road closure or special traffic management arrangementsare required.Make sure emergency entrances and exits remain clear of obstructions at all times and are clearlyindicated by suitable signs, which are illuminated if necessary.Risk associated with some hazards may vary given different types of crowd.Think: What are the needs of young children, teenagers, those with disabilities and elderly people?Then make “reasonable adjustments” for these people e.g. provide extra help at an event and/or changethe physical features to overcome physical barriers to access. If applicable, make sure your eventpolicy and promotional material reflect an inclusive approach (e.g. you could provide material in largerprint/alternative languages etc).Does the venue comply to fire safety laws?ElectricityElectricity can cause death or serious injury to performers, workers or members of the public. Faults,damage, misuse or poor maintenance can result in an appliance or part of an installation becomingunsafe, and a risk of electric shock or fire. In many circumstances the electrical supply may be of atemporary nature, but this does not mean that it can be substandard or of an inferior quality to apermanent installation. - The whole installation, including wiring, switchgear and any generator should be installed in a safe manner by a competent person (i.e. trained, suitably qualified electrician). - All electrical installations and equipment must comply with the general safety requirements and should be inspected/tested by a competent person in according with the procedures laid down in relevant standards. 18
  • You should: - Satisfactorily protect any generator and/ or electrical equipment, including switchgear, to prevent unauthorised access and/ or interference. - Protect all electrical equipment from inclement weather, using covers, enclosures or shelters. - Ensure cables are used which are of the correct rating for the load. There should be no damage to the cables and they must be the correct type of connectors which are suitable for external use (where necessary). - Securely fix cables, protect them against sharp edges or crushing by heavy loads and position them so as not to cause trip or other hazard (e.g. by covering with ramps or rubber mats). - Provide sufficient fixed sockets outlets so that flexible extension leads and multi‐socket outlets can be avoided. Fixed socket outlets can be either permanent or on properly mounted temporary distribution boards. Ideally, equipment should be located within 2m of a fixed socket outlet, to avoid the need for long trailing leads. - Ensure artificial light to all parts of an outdoor venue is adequate if there is not enough daylight. Consider also the lighting of the first aid post, information area/marquees, toilets and emergency entries and exits.First Aid management - Make sure that the basic services for first aid are always available. At smaller events a qualified first aider should be present and an area suitable for first aid treatment (a supply of water should be available). Ideally every event should have at least 2 first aiders. A voluntary first aid society may be asked to provide a First Aid Post staffed by qualified first‐aiders. - Make sure first aid posts are clearly signposted and provided with easy access for the audience. Make sure that all persons assisting at the event know where the first aid post is and where appropriate know the identity of the first aiders. - Record all people seeking treatment.Welfare facilitiesIt is appropriate to provide an adequate number and type of toilets for the number of people expectedto attend the event including provision for people with disabilities.The table below shows a general guideline for music events. Country fairs, garden parties and othershort duration events would warrant fewer facilities but events where there is a high fluid consumptionor with camping would warrant more facilities.For events with a gate opening time of 6 hours or more1 toilet per 100 females 1 toilet per 500 males plus 1 urinal per 150 malesFor events with a gate opening time of less than 6 hours duration1 toilet per 150 females 1 toilet per 600 males plus 1 urinal per 175malesYou should - Ideally use toilets which are connected to mains services but temporary units may have to be provided. If non‐mains units are to be used you must ensure safe and hygienic waste removal is arranged. - Consider the location, access, construction, type of temporary facilities, lighting and signage. - Provide hand‐washing facilities (no less than 1 per 10 toilets) with (warm) water, soap and hand drying facilities. Antiseptic hand wipes or antibacterial gel should be provided where warm water is not available. 19
  • - Regularly maintain, repair and service toilets through out the event to ensure that they are safe, clean and hygienic. - Ensure floors, ramps and steps of the units are stable and of a non‐slip surface construction. - Provide a location where enquiries can be made about lost children, lost property and for information about the event. This could be the Control Room. - Provide drinking water within easy reach of the audience and all catering operations - Provide enough rubbish bins around the site at places where they will be most required - Make sure the bins are regularly emptied. Think about disposal methods and recycling.Food safety adviceAny food (or drink) for sale or given out at your event must be safe. This means that it must complywith all relevant food hygiene and safety legislation.If you are preparing food for the event using volunteers you need to consider the following matterscarefully: - Origin of all foodstuffs - Positioning of the food and the food outlet - Design and construction of the facilities and equipment - Cleanliness and repair of the above - Washing facilities - Temperature control - Staffing including appropriate training - Food safety practices and supervision - Knowledge of the ingredients in food being served‐ customers often ask to avoid problems - from food allergiesFood outlets should be sited in areas where there is minimal risk of contamination of food, so ideallythey need to be away from toilets and refuse storage areas.Ensure there are adequate arrangements for sufficient safe water and for refuse disposal. 20
  • PRE- AND DURING EVENT SAFETY CHECKLIST (EXAMPLE) .Appoint named persons to check these matters & address or report backITEM COMMENTSVENUE SAFETY- Are premises free from hazards? (i.e. even ground/floor surfaces; no trip hazards)- Are all attractions/activities/structures complete, checked and staffed?- Are structures/seating sound & secure; stairways / platforms and equipment guarded; protective barriers/ fencing secure and not posing a hazard?ENTRANCES/EXITS- Are adequate entrances & exits open, clearly marked & staffed to control admission where necessary?- Are all circulation areas, staircases/escape routes/ exits unobstructed with all gates/doors unlocked?CROWD CONTROL- Is the control room operational, with communications and PA systems working?- Are the required number of stewards in their allotted positions; fully briefed on their duties and wearing jackets/tabards?ELECTRICS- Is installation complete/inspected/tested/certified (as appropriate by competent person); is cabling / equipment checked by competent person, secure/ protected & clear of public circulation areas?LIGHTING- Is normal and emergency lighting provided, in working order and lit where necessary?MEDICAL FACILITIES- Are there adequate trained first aiders on site; is a suitable clearly marked room (provided with water) available as a first aid post?FIRE PRECAUTIONS- Is fire fighting equipment in place; rubbish/combustible materials stored away from tents/structures? Stewards /staff briefed?TOILET ACCOMMODATION- Is clearly marked toilet accommodation available (including disabled); have arrangements been made to service them throughout the event?RUBBISH- Are sufficient bins provided around the site and arrangements made to empty them during the event?FOOD SAFETY- Are food stalls clean with safe water supplied and cold storage equipment set at right temperature?NOISE CONTROL- Has stage manager been advised of finish time for live music? Have stewards been advised of times they will tour to check no nuisance to neighbours? 21
  • 1.11. Invitations.Who will you invite?If you havent already, start a computerized worksheet list of possible donors with mailing informationand a column to record donations. This can be used now and in the future. You can also purchase amailing list from local business that deal with mass mailings. They can target a specific audience.Invite people from the national headquarters of your charity. Send a personalized invitation tocorporation heads and local celebrities, or anyone that may be or has been a contributor.Always include the date and time for the RSVP, knowing that some people will be late in responding,plan accordingly. 22
  • 1.12. Publicity and printing.Advertise in local and surrounding newspapers, charity newsletters, radio, television, internet and wordof mouth, or any other opportunities that come your way.Local advertising weeklies and newspapers have a column “city posts” or “where to …” where youcan have your event publicized for free. National newspapers often have pages which they reserve forlocal news. Mail your announcement well in advance and assure a telephone follow-up.Approach your press contacts, if youve made any, or the regional redaction of newspapers about doingan advance story on the benefit. If the space isnt available, be prepared to submit a press releaseoutlining the details.Some local organizations may agree to list your event in their membership magazine. Contact them inperson and inform about timing, form and content of your announcement. Check into a live remotebroadcast from the event site with your local radio station. If you dont ask, you dont get.It is always a good PR move to send out speakers, from time to time, from your charity to other nonprofit groups and to participate in coordination councils to speak about your charity and relate helpfulinformation. These groups can help to promote the event.Careful though needs to go into the design and production of materials for the event. Is there a speciallogo or design that will be on all the materials? (correspondence, posters, entry forms, sponsor forms,programs, certificates for participants, …)Distribute a flyer or informative leaflet from door to door at least ten days before the date of the event.Avoid posting the flyer on the same day as the local advertising newspapers.You can also hand out or post forms to: people at other events, supporters of your organization,schools, sports clubs, local cultural organizations, railway station parking lot, …Your leaflet should contain- an interesting illustration to draw attention,- the 5 W’s (who, what, when, where and why),- how to get more information- name and address of the responsible editor- a reminder not to throw the leaflet away in public area’s (rather give me to a friend or acquaintance)Prepare appropriate display materials, including flyers, handbills and posters, for your volunteers topass out or put up two to three weeks before the event. Make sure they know where to legally stickflyers and posters. Slapping them on municipal property, such as utility poles, can result in fines.Interesting places are: shops, malls, bank agencies, meeting rooms of local organizations, libraries,town hall, service centers, cultural center, church porch, …It may be a good idea to have your posters printed in two sizes : A4 or legal format posters can be putup at small shops and by individuals before the home window. A3 posters are better fit for shoppingmalls, bank agencies, message boards, etc… 23
  • Put up a website to inform as well as answer questions about the benefit. Include major sponsors, theevent lineup and activities, and how the fundraising is coming along.For larger events, a well-placed series of flyers and online ads are a must. 24
  • 1.13. Your Costs.What are the costs to set up the event?Establish a budget for planning the event. Remember that the idea of the event is to make money tosupport a cause, so you dont want to incur too many expenses. Look for ways to keep your costs downby getting volunteers and donated products and services in return for sponsored recognition.All possible expenses, incomes, sponsors, and contingent expenses should be included.Get approval for your budget, schedule, draft schedule of activities, draft posters and leaflets, etc…from your team members.Remember: It is important to make sure administrative actions are being taken care of as well. Thingslike poor accounting, and lack of correspondence can create problems for any event.If the event will be small, you may be able to hold it in your building and use equipment you have.Larger fund raisers may need a rented location and equipment.Depending the case you make, some venues may waive rental fees, but dont leave them out of theequation.You may need to pay people to set up and tear down.Ask local business to donate their facilities or products.Find sponsors for prizes (raffle, competition, …) and incentivesIncentives are for encouraging fundraising (special award for the top fundraiser, bottle of wine forraising 100 €Deposits can be costly and sometimes unexpected, so be sure to have extra cash on hand.When planning an event, you must consider the 6 Ps, the marketing mix: - people: audience, participants, entertainment, - product: type of event - price: tickets, entry, sponsoring, donations, sales percentage, own sales (books, T-shirts …), raffle or lottery, incentives for fundraising, advertising, staff costs, helpers’ costs (travel allowances, food, …), hire of facilities and equipment, public liability insurance, … - place: where? - period: date 25
  • 1.14. The SpeakerHire a well known, entertaining speaker that will draw people to the event.Generally, it is preferable to have one speaker, rather than to risk confusing the audience by havingvarious speakers treat different aspects of the subject.Some celebrities or public figures will do this for little or no cost for fundraisers.Do not limit yourself to inviting a speaker by e-mail or telephone. Assure a timely personal contactwith the speaker. - Use the personal contact to introduce yourself, your organization and the audience, - Situate the event in the context of your general activity and goals, - Discuss the content, and schedule the time of beginning and duration of the speech - agree on the time of presence, fee, travel allowance, possibilities for follow-up, availability of a written handout of the speech, folder or brochurePlan the intervention carefully: you do not want the speaker to speak after the dinner …As a rule, you require a personal contribution from the speaker: you do not want him to repeat a speechhe gave some time ago for an other fundraising event or to talk about subjects not connected to yourorganization and its goals.Emphasize the agreed duration of the speech. If the speaker is asked to deliver an introductory speechonly, his speech should not take longer than 15 minutes.It is important both for the speaker and for the organizer to have a clear view of the people who willassist. Take into consideration their age, social situation, educative level, knowledge, motivation,commitment and insight. - How much do they know about the organization, about the project, about the subject of the speech? - Which questions might they have? - Why are they present? (night out, social gathering, exchange ideas, …) - Are they expecting general information, practical guidelines, encouragement, …?The speaker should possess the necessary qualities, experience and expertise to talk about the subjectand build contact with the audience. Some speakers me be suitable for a young public, but lesssuitable for a more mature audience.He should speak from his personal conviction and should be unprejudiced and open to the public. Hisspeech should be sufficiently interesting, intelligible and clear.It is an advantage if the speaker is known by the audience.Be careful how the speaker is introduced: Don’t announce a “confrontation”, or “debate” unless thespeaker agreed to bring his speech as such. 26
  • Assure some kind of interaction from the part of the audience: the speech may raise questions with theaudience. Some of these questions may be about your project or organization more than about thespeech itself. Make sure a qualified moderator is appointed to assist the speaker and answer to thesequestions.1.15. Entertainment.Entertainment can be very expensive.Look for some local musicians or comedians who need more exposure. This would be a good way forthem to get free advertising. You will not only be promoting the event with their names in everyadvertisement, when they perform at the event, the guests will hear how entertaining they can be.You could even have a mini battle of the bands or battle of the comedians. Pass out ballets and havethe guests vote. Give an award to the winner. 27
  • WORK TO BE DONE 1 TO 2 WEEKS BEFORE THE EVENTReconfirm all staffing, equipment and service arrangementsEnsure event staff have access to water and rest roomsMake arrangements for collecting fees, if necessary (staff, petty cash, security)Get supplies, exchange money, traffic cones, tape, tools, refreshments, …Send out press release and contact local reporters at least one week before eventRemind VIPs about the eventCall the Speaker and performers for reconfirmation 28
  • WORK TO BE DONE 2 TO 3 DAYS BEFORE THE EVENTPrepare any products and equipment that should be transported to the venue and put them in markedboxes, ready for transportation.Hold a "tie down" meeting.Distribute a schedule of events to each committee member.Check assignments. Check whether everybody will be present in time for the event, otherwise makesure you get some more people to help you.Distribute identification badges.Check whether all invitations have been sent and responded to. Create a list of invitees.Check whether all activities are going on schedule.Check travel arrangements/maps/directions for participants.Collect enough money/cash for the event expenses from concerned persons. 29
  • Check whether participants kit is ready. This kit might include a bottle of water, snack bar, note paper,pen, brochure and any information they may need. It is also a good idea to include small mementos.Prepare minute to minute agenda for important activities.Make a checklist of the things to be taken to the venue.Answer any questionsGo to the venue and check whether all things are ready.Get the keys, reconfirm contact data for assistance on the day of the eventCheck all equipment present (sound, beamer, ….) 30
  • THE DAY OF THE EVENTArrive early to the venue with your team members and volunteers, because there is still a lot to dobefore the actual event will start.Re-check for the electric reading and that all electronic equipment is in working order.Make sure the organizers are wearing a distinct badge or some other noticeable implement so thatparticipants can find help if needed.Place signposts from the street to the entrance if necessaryPut the Welcome Banners and other info in front of the building.Make a reception and registration counter.Inform the sponsors on where to put the stalls. (Make allocation of space earlier).Keep the microphones, and speakers ready. Put on music for an informal event.Make sure the host speaker has the schedule and resume of the chief guest ready. He/She should bewell prepared. Make sure the host/anchor/Master of Ceremony is aware of the purpose of the event aswell as the people who are organizing it.Make sure that speakers are aware of any time constraints.A lot of money may circulate during the event: make sure to timely empty the money cases and securethe money received.Welcome the delegates and others.Check for clear indication of cloak room, ticket desk, …Take care of any special requests, especially those of the outstations and chief guest.Have a separate person to look after the needs of General Delegates (Non-VIPs) and for PR (PublicRelations).Give directions to those who need them.Take photos of all important things especially sponsors banners, your banner, entrance, receptions etc.Take note of questions and observationsProvide forms for feedback and follow-upEnsure all resources (food, water etc) are sufficient, otherwise work out your contingency plan.Take the feedback from participants. 31
  • Start at the posted time (+ max 15 “academic minutes”)If a pause is planned, limit it to about 15 minutesAlso end at the posted time.Thank everybody for their participation.Do not start to summarize, evaluate or express your personal appreciation for the event. If there areannouncements to be made, first inform the audience about the number of items, then state thembriefly.Ending the event does not necessarily mean that the team should immediately start tearing down thedecoration, dismantling whatever temporary constructions have been put in place and cleaning thelocal. This might on the contrary be the ideal moment for an informal chat, for a last visit to aninformation booth or to contact any interesting people that may still be around.However, do start cleaning up and shutting down in time. This may be the same day, of the next day,depending on the time of closing and of the arrangements made.Before leaving the venue, execute a general safety check. Make sure to check for correct shut off ofwater, gas and electricity supply and that all doors are closed correctly. Do not forget to also check anyrefrigerators or other equipment for correct closing or shut off.If the cleaning up takes place the next day, it might be a good idea to offer something to eat and/ordrink to the team members.Return keys after the tearing down and cleaning has been completed. Before leaving the locals, checkfor forgotten items. 32
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  • AFTER THE EVENTCommunication with PartnersAfter the event is complete, it is good to communicate with all parties involved in the event.Thank the all team members, especially sponsors and volunteers.Have a Thank You party for those who helped.Send letters to each participating organization to thank them for their cooperation and help in carryingout the event.Have a post-review meeting to perform better next time. 35
  • Report to the PublicCreate a public report including the basics, such as those outlined below. A public report will help thegeneral public and decision makers within your organization understand what happened at the eventand can assist planning, funding requests, cost assessments and other analysis for future events. - Brief description of program objective of the event - Dates and locations of the event - Number of participants - Types and quantities of materials collected - Contact information for those seeking more detailed information about the event - Draft a press release publicizing the results of your event.Use the opportunity to help the public see how much waste was reused or recycled. 36
  • AdministrationFinalize and settle the accounts.Distribute any souvenirs or other publications to relevant people.Deliver the receipts to sponsors and others.Distribute the photos to those who require it and post the photos in your event website.Evaluate the feedback forms (or feedback from your website) 37
  • A SHANTY TOWN NAMED CLARA ZETKIN This is a story of a girl in her early twenties, inspired by one idea: to help the neediest people she could find. She eventually found her way to a shanty town in Santiago, Chile, as part of a Mill Hill Mission. Soon after her arrival in Santiago, she took the dramatic decision to give up the “standard approach” to “helping slum dwellers”. Instead of staying in a comfortable place herself and supporting the people of Clara Zetkin from there, she built her own wooden cottage inside the slum and went to live with the people, share the dirt and poverty with them and fight together with them for better living conditions. For more than 12 years, she lived with the people from Clara Zetkin. The first half of this period, she shared their lives in conditions unworthy of man. The second half, she accompanied them in the new social barrio, named Santa Clara, to which theywere displaced.This is the year 1978, and the girl I am writing about is my sister, Marlies Adriaens.Marlies grew up as the third of seven children in a deeply Catholic home in Terjoden, a small villagenear Aalst in Flanders, Belgium. After graduating as a nurse, she took short courses in all sorts ofpractical things. Whilst working as a nurse in a hospital in Aalst, she became friendly with a nun whohad just returned home from Chile.Another sister, preparing to continue the sister’s job at Hogar de Cristo, finally could not go. Withher mind meanwhile turned to the sufferings and needs of the poor people in Chile, Marlies promisedthe sisters that she would go to Chile herself to help the people who most needed her help andassistance.A period of specialized courses and preparations followed. Then came a surprise telephone call fromone Antonia Beentjens in Holland: Would she be interested in a joint trip to Chile? Six months later,the two girls found themselves lodged with two separate families in the suburbs of Santiago, to learnSpanish.Marlies and Anthonia were lodged in Maipú, in a respectable suburb of Santiago. Yet, on the otherside of the road was a campamento: a collection of about 400 shacks housing about 3.000 people.According to local gossip, the campamento was a hotbed of vice, drugs, violence, robbery andprostitution.The reality, such as Marlies and Anthonia observed it, was that these were families who had fled thepoverty from other regions in Chile and were hoping to find work and build a decent living inSantiago.Soon, they started frequenting the people from the campamento. They immediately learned that thepeople from the campamento, though treating them with the greatest respect, were suspicious about 38
  • their real intentions and afraid to talk about their problems. After all, this was 1978 and the countrywas being ruled with iron hand by Pinochet. People – especially poor people - were not allowed toorganize, and the oppression and intimidation from army and police had left the people very consciousof their vulnerability and afraid of retaliations should they dare to break the law.There was something else hindering the relations between the people from the campamento and thetwo European girls. “How can you help us? You don’t even understand our reality” they were toldover and over again. “At night, you go to sleep in a warm bed; during the week-ends, you eat atrestaurants and watch movies at the cinema … you don’t know how it is to spend your days in mudand dirt, not being able to send your children to school, or to pay a doctor when they need one.With some trepidation, the two girls decided to built their own little cottage and settle down amongstthe people of the slum. “One day, no more than one day, that is how long it will take before you areraped and robbed”, the good people of Maipú warned them. “I have been robbed”, Marlies smiles:“But never in Chile. Some years ago however, in Brussels, the radio was stolen from my car”.To live with the people and be part of their life, was a first step.The second step was, to become aware of the problems. There was no shortage of these: poverty,unemployment, malnutrition, in some cases even bordering on starvation, especially in the children. Inaddition: widespread neurosis in the women and alcoholism in the men, both the fruit of frustrationand despair. There were also the health problems related to living in conditions not worthy of man:skin diseases, respiratory problems, allergies, parasites, …Step three was the most difficult: convince the people to organize. “They will imprison us, they willraid our houses, shoot at us, …” The tragic truth was that, unless they organized, they would lose allthey ever hoped to find in Santiago. Families would fall apart, people would die. Marlies and Antonaconvince them that there was no alternative to organizing. And so, they organized!The first initiatives concentrated on the children. First, a “children restaurant” was organized withleftovers from adjacent markets and food begged in shops. But soon, lack of space forced them toswitch to a system of “village kitchen” in which teams of women prepared the meals, that were thentaken home and eaten in family circle.Knitting-teams made the uniforms that allowed the children to go to school and the smartestyoungsters helped the slow learners amongst younger children.Once started, the people were eager to learn and create opportunities: lessons in dressmaking, haircare and electricity were organized and the municipal authorities were contacted about items such asdistribution of water and electricity, collection of household refuse and medical assistance. Solidariteitsfonds Chili 9400 NINOVE Account number: BE21 8333 5872 9003 - Bic code / Swift code: GKCCBEBB 39
  • Sources:http://www.wikihow.com/Organize-a-Benefithttp://www.fundraiserhelp.com/organizing-charity-events.htm (Berwyn J. Kemp)http://www.ehow.com/how_2352019_organize-benefit.htmlhttp://www.citizenworks.org/tools/campus/tools-campus-fundraising.phphttp://www.ehow.com/list_6121858_top-10-fundraising-ideas.htmlhttp://ezinearticles.com/?How-to-Organize-a-Charity-Benefit&id=2781396 (Sharon Koss)http://www.mass.gov/dep/recycle/reduce/toolkit/rchecklist.pdfhttp://www.planetfriendly.net/promote.htmlhttp://www.wikihow.com/Organise-an-Eventhttp://www.stoptb.org/assets/documents/getinvolved/resmob/tool2_eventplanning.pdfhttp://www.librarysupport.net/librarylovers/eventips.htmlhttp://www.dorsetforyou.com/media.jsp?mediaid=161009&filetype=pdfhttp://soschili.skynetblogs.be/http://www.rayenmahuida.tk/http://santaclara-cerronavia.skynetblogs.be/ 40
  • NOW, GO FOR IT ! 41