APRIL/maY 2012

ROADS
A U S T R A L I A’ S road M A N A G E M E N T and c onstru c tion maga z ine

Intelligent
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April/May 2012

ROADS
Copyright © 2012 Commstrat
Publisher: CommStrat
Editor: Rex Pannell
Production: Annette Epifanidis

...
FEATURES
Photo courtesy of Transurban

Developing a rational
transport market
Australia needs a more honest debate about h...
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Building a road is a big job. Which is why an increasing number of road constr...
FEATURES

4

ROADS APRIL/MAY 2012

Figure 3: Australia’s domestic freight task,
bulk and non-bulk,1961–2050
Bulk

Non-Bulk...
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The priorities of
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Calculating the
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Airport Link impact on Leighton’s result
A downturn in the financial performance
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Latest F5 upgrade widens freeway
The $116 million upgrading and widening
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Builders shortlisted for Pacific Highway duplication
Three construction companies have been short listed f...
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New generation noise wall for parts of
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In what is described as first for Victoria, the
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Widening of Northbridge Tunnel and Mitchell Freeway
Northbridge Tunnel. Image courtesy
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Fewer truck movements at Port Botany

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Increased rail capacity at DP World’s Port
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Upgrade of key link road in
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  1. 1. APRIL/maY 2012 ROADS A U S T R A L I A’ S road M A N A G E M E N T and c onstru c tion maga z ine Intelligent S tamar k tm pav ement mar k ing ta p es Road Safety & Linemarking ROADS Transport systems Caterpillar Feature pages 25–30 a r po is supported by r o nc I PRINT POST APPROVED PP 334158/00024 g tin t us A b a St t m eg S ROADS APRIL/MAY 2012 en 1
  2. 2. YOUR PROFIT IS OUR AIM BENNINGHOVEN produces all plant components in house to set the highest level of quality for our products. Constant research and development make our products efficient, ecological and economical. With expertise of today, your partner for tomorrow! Mobile, Transportable, Stationary and Container Asphalt Plants for both continuous and batch production, Capacity range 60-450 t/h Multi Fuel Combination Burners High Efficient Bitumen Tank Systems Bitumen-Emulsion Plants Polymer Production Plants Mixed Material Systems Satellite Storage Silo Plants Asphalt Recycling Crushers Hot and Cold Recycling Systems Systems for Low-Temperature Asphalt Production Modernisation of existing plants Computer Control with fault Diagnostic Systems Additive Dosing Systems Mastic Asphalt Technique Dealership: Industrial Consultants Production Machinery BLISS & REELS P.O. Box 215 Bulleen, VIC 3105, Australia Ph: +613 9850-6666 D D Hilden D The consistently high standard of BENNINGHOVEN products in every category has cemented our reputation as the best value, premium brand within the asphalt industry. Mülheim Wittlich D Berlin A Graz BG Sofia F Paris HU Budapest Vilnius Warsaw RO Sibiu RUS ROADS APRIL/MAY 2012 Leicester PL 2 GB LT Your success is our aim. Therefore we stand united. Fx: +613 9852-1345 Moscow S Göteborg www.blissandreels.com.au BENNINGHOVEN GmbH & Co. KG Industriegebiet D-54486 Mülheim/Mosel Tel: +49 (0)6534 - 18 90 Fax: +49 (0)6534 - 89 70 info@benninghoven.com www.benninghoven.com
  3. 3. April/May 2012 ROADS Copyright © 2012 Commstrat Publisher: CommStrat Editor: Rex Pannell Production: Annette Epifanidis ROADS Art Direction: Annette Epifanidis Graphic Designer: Odette Boulton n SALES & MARKETING National Manager 12 Yuri Mamistvalov Tel: (03) 8534 5008 Email: yuri@commstrat.com.au 17 38 n Developing a rationAL transport market SUBSCRIPTIONS Customer Service Ruth Spiegel Tel: (03) 8534 5001 Fax: (03) 9530 8911 Email: ruth.spiegel@commstrat.com.au n HEAD OFFICE Lvl 8, 574 St Kilda Rd. Melbourne 3004 PO Box 6137, St Kilda Rd Central 8008 Tel: (03) 8534 5000 Fax: (03) 9530 8911 Email: enquiries@commstrat.com.au Web: www.commstrat.com.au www.roadsonline.com.au www.roadjobs.com.au n Subscription Rates Australia SIX ISSUES A$60 ROADS TWELVE ISSUES A$110 n UPCOMING FEATURES June • • • • • • • Survey Gear Roads Tunnel Lighting Road Safety Safety Barrier Systems Excavators Attachments AAPA Asphalt Review Equipment Review: Pavers and profilers August • • • • • • • Subgrade Preparation; Road Safety; Road Pavement Maintenance; Road Building Equipment; Intelligent Transport Systems; AustStab Stabilisation segment; and Equipment Review (Compaction). 2 The priorities of national regulators and reducing congestion 6 Calculating the Greenhouse Footprint of Roads 8 Roads covered by first rating scheme for sustainable infrastructure 10 MOU focuses on Intelligent Transport Systems 32 Personal safety awareness The new frontier for transport 42 Legislation to improve truckie safety and reduce road toll 46 New medical standards for drivers come into force 46 is supported by 35 Chairman’s Report 36 Awards for excellence 37 Bituminous stabilised materials: a pavement solution 37 Local Bitumen Supply will continue to be reliable 38 Pavement Stabilisation – The advantages of quicklime over hydrated lime 38 Ceo’s Report REGULAR FEATURES PROJECT UPDATE News Briefing ROADS ROADS isis supported by ROADS supported by 12 16 is supported by ROADS APRIL/MAY 2012 1
  4. 4. FEATURES Photo courtesy of Transurban Developing a rational transport market Australia needs a more honest debate about how it can close the gaps in its transport infrastructure and underpin national productivity, including a real discussion about developing a rational transport market, argues Infrastructure Partnerships Australia’s Chief Executive, Brendan Lyon. There is a strong consensus between Australia’s policymakers, the business community and the public about the need for more (and better) infrastructure. The public debate is increasingly focussed on two broad themes; Australia’s declining productivity and growing ‘cost of living’ pressures that are impacting households and businesses. The focus on these themes is fundamental to Australia’s global competitiveness; however these themes are really a discussion of the symptoms, rather than the lack of infrastructure investment and inefficient utilisation of existing infrastructure that is causing these impacts. In short, the broad consensus about the need for infrastructure solutions has yet to mature into an honest public debate about the difficult reforms that are available to solve these challenges. In the roads sector, the need for meaningful and sustained investment and better regulation is fast becoming acute. Already, road network congestion costs the national economy more than $10 billion per annum. Figure one, below, shows the cost per kilometre of congestion in Australia’s capital cities. Without substantial investment and reform, recurrent avoidable congestion costs are expected to exceed $20 billion by the end of this decade. (See Figure 1) The case for reform toward an efficient transport market is unequivocal, particularly when current impacts are considered in the context of rapidly growing demand drivers. Figure X, below, shows IPA’s modelling of national population growth to 2050. Our research finds that Australia’s population will reach 37.8 million people over the coming four decades. More people will naturally place much greater demands on Australia’s transport networks. After all, more people will mean more freight, more journey-to-work demands and a greater call on Australia’s road and rail networks. (See Figure 2) IPA’s research finds that the national freight task will double by the end of the present decade; and will triple to more than 1,540 billion tonne kilometres by 2050. Figure X, below, shows the forecast growth across both bulk and non-bulk freight. (See Figure 3) The growth in the broader freight task will also place a much greater call on Australia’s road network. Figure X, below, shows that the tripling in the freight task will have a corollary tripling in demand on the nation’s roads. The Federal Government anticipates that the tripling of the freight task will be accompanied by an even greater growth in the passenger task, with an expected four-fold increase in demand for passenger transport over the same period. (See Figure 4) The substantial growth in the nation’s passenger and freight transport task will demand significant and sustained investment in new network capacity. Figure X below shows IPA’s estimates of transport infrastructure investment requirements to 2050. Our research finds that Australia will need to fund at least a quadrupling of current Figure 1: Average unit cost of congestion for Australian metropolitan centres, current and projected Figure 2: Figure Australia’s population growth, 1850 – 2051 Figure 2 Figure 1 38 36 34 14 32 30 28 12 26 24 22 Million Unit Costs (c/km) 10 8 20 18 16 14 6 12 10 4 8 6 2 4 2 Source: Bureau of Infrastructure, Transport Regional Economic, Working Paper 71, 2007 2005 2 ROADS APRIL/MAY 2012 2020 M Year ended June Source: Urban Transport Challenge: Driving reform on Sydney’s roads, Infrastructure Partnerships Australia, 2009 Forecasts (IBISWorld) 2050 2040 2030 2020 2010 2000 1990 1980 1970 1960 1950 Ca 1940 e nb 1930 w r Da 1920 Ad b Ho 1910 Pe n ai lit ge po ra ro ve et A rra in 1900 Br i a el t ar 1890 b el M a isb rth 1880 S r ou de 1870 yd ne ne 1860 0 y ne 1850 0
  5. 5. Keep road projects moving with Limil lime. Building a road is a big job. Which is why an increasing number of road construction projects are turning to Sibelco lime to stabilise soil and prevent unnecessary delays. And though we’ve changed our name from Unimin, we haven’t changed the quality of lime you’ve come to expect from us. Whether it’s Quicklime, Hydrated Lime or one of our many other limestone products you require, the Limil brand comes with 135 years of lime manufacturing expertise, the security of long-term supplies and a level of quality and consistency that our ISO9001:2008 Quality Program delivers. To find out more about Limil, Sibelco and our industry-leading products, visit www.sibelco.com.au UNM12232 ROADS APRIL/MAY 2012 3
  6. 6. FEATURES 4 ROADS APRIL/MAY 2012 Figure 3: Australia’s domestic freight task, bulk and non-bulk,1961–2050 Bulk Non-Bulk Billion Tonne – Kilometres 1400 1200 1000 800 600 400 200 2055 2050 2045 2040 2035 2030 2025 2020 2015 2010 2005 2000 1995 1990 1985 1980 1975 1970 1965 1960 0 Source: Meeting the 2050 Freight Challenge, Infrastructure Partnerships Australia, 2008 Figure 4: Growth in Australian road freight, 1960-2051 650 600 550 500 Tonne-kms (billion) 450 400 350 300 250 200 150 100 50 2050 2045 2040 2035 2030 2025 2020 2015 2010 2005 2000 1995 1990 1985 1980 1975 1970 1965 1960 0 Source: Urban transport challenge: Driving reform on Sydney’s roads, Infrastructure Partnerships Australia, 2009 Figure 5: Transport infrastructure investment, 1985-2050 70 60 50 40 30 20 10 Source: Meeting the 2050 Freight Challenge, Infrastructure Partnerships Australia, 2008 The first and most important step is in beginning a reasoned and mature public debate about the relative merits of a national road pricing scheme – and its potential to change the way Australia funds and manages its transport infrastructure. 2050 2045 2040 2035 2030 2025 2020 2015 2010 2005 2000 1995 1990 0 1985 Capital expenditure, $ billion (F2008 prices) investment levels to more than $64 billion per annum by 2050, if we are to maintain current levels of capacity and productivity across the transport network. (See Figure 5.) As with any capacity constraint, there are two fundamental responses; adding capacity and/or managing demand. Historically, Australia’s response has been limited to the supply side of the transport equation, with new road capacity added to deal with increased demand. But the sheer scale of the challenge and the inability to efficiently add supply to high demand areas, such as Australia’s capital cities and major freight corridors, will logically drive reform toward a rational market for transport. In 2010, Infrastructure Partnerships Australia issued a major discussion paper examining the role that rational road pricing could play in addressing our transport infrastructure challenges. Our paper put forward a model that would remove the array of often inconsistent, inefficient and invisible road user charges, such as vehicle registration, licensing and the fuel surcharge; replacing them with a tiered charging scheme based on the time, location and distance travelled by a vehicle. Our modelling found that the abolition of all existing road user imposts in favour of a transparent road pricing scheme – including a modest increase in the average cost per kilometre – could liberate up to $10.8 billion each year for investment in transport infrastructure. In a structural sense, this kind of model is far from revolutionary. Australia has already largely reformed its other network infrastructure markets such as water, electricity and gas to reflect actual cost of use. But we also recognise that this kind of change would make the cost of use of the road network visible to motorists and represents a substantial change to the status quo. Australians pay an estimated $22.8 billion each year in road-related fees and charges. Under a rational model, prices could be set at a level that achieves revenue neutrality once existing road taxes and charges are removed; or at a level which increases revenue to allow expanded investment in the maintenance and construction of projects that promote a sustainable transport system, including road, rail and public transport. By providing better price signals that reflect users own impacts on the network, a rational pricing model presents a substantial opportunity to address the demand side of the transport equation and create the framework of an efficient broader transport market. The first and most important step is in beginning a reasoned and mature public debate about the relative merits of a national road pricing scheme – and its potential to change the way Australia funds and manages its transport infrastructure. Australia’s policymakers will have to engage in a much better informed and honest public debate about the options and tradeoffs; there is no pot of gold at the end of the budget rainbow. New investment is critical but it is only half the solution. Rational road pricing will provide new capacity to fund projects, but also drive better utilisation of existing road assets. Infrastructure Australia articulated the challenge facing policymakers in its most recent report to COAG: “As a country…we are reluctant to increase government debt… baulk at raising taxes…are uncomfortable with the user pays concept and against selling assets and using the proceeds to fund other infrastructure….yet we are concerned about congestion, water, electricity and telecommunications. “There is a profound disconnect here.” Creation of an efficient transport market, including a rational road pricing scheme is a real option to make meaningful inroads into Australia’s transport challenges. We need to see Australia’s governments, business leaders and the community engage with the concept so that we can begin a real debate about Australia’s transport future.
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  8. 8. FEATURES The priorities of national regulators and reducing congestion Federal Transport Minister, Anthony Albanese, has used speeches to key industry associations to reinforce the government’s commitment to creating national regulators for the road, rail and maritime sectors, and its focus on reducing congestion. Mr Albanese told the Australian Logistics Council Forum on March 29 that it was hard to overstate the importance of the decision to create single national regulators for the road, rail and maritime sectors from 1 January 2013. He said it would cut the number of transport regulators across Australia from 23 to three. “It is indeed the most important microeconomic reform to the transport sector since Federation; one that has been considered but never secured by generations of transport ministers. “It will mean an end to the various and inconsistent state-by-state regulatory arrangements which have frustrated operators, stifled efficiency and acted as a handbrake on productivity. This change alone will boost national income by $30 billion over the next 20 years.” Mr Albanese told the forum that reforming regulation was part of the answer, but it needed to be backed by smart planning. He said that was where the National Ports Strategy and the National Land Freight Strategy came into play. “Both strategies are important steps towards a seamless national land freight system. The ultimate goal is one national integrated system that identifies existing and future roads, rail lines, intermodal terminals, ports and airports, all linking together, seamlessly. “As a government and an industry, we’ve got to get this right,” Mr Albanese said. He said since the launch of the draft National Freight Strategy last year, the government had received 75 submissions which it was working through. Mr Albanese said a successful land strategy was nothing without seamless integration at the nation’s ports — facilities that connected Australia with the world. “Almost all our exports and imports flow through our sea ports. Our National Ports Strategy addresses the need for much better long term planning while acknowledging the strategic connections between ports, transport corridors and shipping channels. The strategy will be considered by COAG shortly.”  Mr Albanese said logistic solutions were like a Swiss clock, all parts must work perfectly and in unison. “It’s a great metaphor for the work of the Australia Logistics Council — a national, cross-modal body, bringing together different parties to focus on improving the entire system. Government policy is the same — each of our reforms must link in with our investments to produce better outcomes.” 6 ROADS APRIL/MAY 2012 Image courtesy of abc.net.au On March 14, Mr Albanese addressed the Bus Industry Confederation Annual Dinner and told them congestion was one of the greatest handbrakes to Australia’s national productivity. “That means reducing the hours Australians spend behind the wheel of a car goes to the core our decision-making. It points more than ever to the need for high-quality public transport that is so reliable, so frequent and so affordable that it becomes a far better choice than reversing the car from the garage.” Mr Albanese said this saturation and even downward trend in travel was not happening just in Australia. He said a report by the Bureau of Infrastructure, Transport and Regional Economics Traffic Growth: Modelling a Global Phenomenon, analysed 25 countries and revealed declines in kilometres travelled per person in many of them including France, the United States, New Zealand and Italy. “Buses are uniquely suited to help ease congestion. You are the work horses of the public transport network. Figures, also from BITRE, show that people are taking to buses like never before. “In 2010, Australians travelled more than six billion kilometres in buses and the trend is increasing. Your own report Moving People — Across Australia highlights that the coach sector contributes more than $5 billion to the Australian economy and supports almost 16 million nights of tourism. “In the last five years, Australia has produced $3 billion worth of buses,” Mr Albanese said. The minister said one of the interesting things the confederation had highlighted in its report was that buses provided an alternative to car travel, and also took up less space on the road. “This is best highlighted by the often quoted fact that a single bus lane on the Sydney Harbour Bridge carries more people than all the other lanes combined. One bus can remove on average 50 cars from our roads.” Mr Albanese said the government had committed to at least one major public transport project in every mainland state — in Queensland there were two. “Such improvements free up our roads from congestion making people’s daily lives easier, and giving them more time with their family, friends and at their workplace.” Mr Albanese said keeping Australia’s communities connected across vast distances in the face of climate change and population pressures was not easy. He said through the Bus Industry Confederation the industry sector had a strong and articulate voice representing its interests. “They are also the interests of the Australian people who need and deserve a first class network connecting us within cities, between cities and all the towns along the way.”
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  10. 10. FEATURES Calculating the Greenhouse Footprint of Roads The rapidly increasing concern with climate change has led to a marked increase in the number of organisations seeking to understand their carbon footprint and the road construction industry is no different. Historically, road agencies have developed their own greenhouse tools to suit local conditions; however, these tools do not allow for the benchmarking of road projects across the jurisdictions due to variations in the scope and methodologies applied. Recognising the value of having a consistent approach across all jurisdictions, the Australian and New Zealand road agencies have jointly funded a project to develop a common approach to the assessment of greenhouse gas emissions associated with the design, construction and operation of a road project. The final product is the joint effort of six road agencies: • Road Maritime Services New South Wales; • New Zealand Transport Authority: • Department of Planning, Transport and Infrastructure South Australia; • Department of Infrastructure, Energy and Resources Tasmania; • Main Roads Western Australia; and • VicRoads, Victoria). It is anticipated the product will be utilised by all road agencies across Australia. The project has involved two discrete stages: • The development of a workbook to document the emission factors utilised and the assumptions made to develop a standardised approach for a suite of standard pavement designs over the wholeof-life of a road project; and • The development of a user friendly calculator known as Carbon Gauge® to identify emissions associated with each stage in the life of a road considered to generate materially significant amounts of greenhouse gas emissions, namely construction, maintenance and operation (street lights and traffic lights). Simon Renton, Project Manager of the initiative, said the approach adopted by the Australian and New Zealand road agencies is unique. Mr Renton, Senior Engineer Environmental Sustainability with VicRoads, said that for the first time, proponents can assess the whole of life emissions associated with a particular road construction project. A review of overseas literature identified a variety of greenhouse calculators available in the market or as propriety products for internal use by specific organisations. However, these calculators were limited to the construction stage of a project. The UK Highway Agency had adopted an alternative approach based on materials and fuels used in construction and maintenance activities undertaken in any one year, but it did not enable whole-of-life emissions for a specific project. 8 ROADS APRIL/MAY 2012 “With increasing demand in Australia and New Zealand for emissions over the whole-of-life of a project to be estimated for use in project approvals and/or Environmental Impact Statements, there was a clear need for a different approach,” Mr Renton said. “There was also an incentive to adopt a standard model to avoid duplication of effort from agencies, contractors and suppliers and to provide a more consistent platform for benchmarking. “The result is a consistent and transparent approach to estimating greenhouse gas emissions over the fifty-year life of any single road project.” The approach adopted also follows the philosophy of the National Greenhouse and Energy Reporting Act for determining materiality. The workbook identifies that the design phase of road construction is not material and is therefore excluded from the subsequent calculator. Mr Renton said while it was widely acknowledged that decisions made in the design process (i.e. the alignment, gradients and materials or equipment selected) can have a significant impact on the greenhouse gas emissions from the road during its life, the actual emissions associated with producing the design are not materially significant. Similarly, the emissions associated with decommissioning a road are not included, as roads are rarely decommissioned. “The workbook and the calculator do not address emissions from the use of vehicles on the road as other tools and processes exist to do this,” Mr Renton said. “However, this emission source is able to be considered and included as an input. Over the 50-year life of a road, vehicle emissions are estimated to be the largest source of emissions representing in excess of 90% of the total emission footprint.” The workbook is available through the agency websites. In addition, the Carbon Gauge® Calculator is being investigated for its suitability to become a web-based online tool, which will ensure its ongoing integrity and avoid obsolete versions being used by interested stakeholders. This will also enable capture of information for benchmarking purposes with the potential for setting targets for road construction projects into the future. For further information contact the road authority within each State or the New Zealand Transport Authority. The designated contacts are: Robert Mitchell NZTA, NZ Robert.Mitchell@nzta.govt.nz Anne Welsh DPTI, SA Anne.Welsh@sa.gov.au Con Lambous RMS, NSW Con.Lambous@rta.nsw.gov.au Louis Bettini Main Roads, WA Louis.Bettini@mainroads.wa.gov.au Dick Shaw DIER, Tas Dick.Shaw@dier.tas.gov.au Simon Renton VicRoads, Vic Simon.Renton@roads.vic.gov.au
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  12. 12. FEATURES Roads covered by first rating scheme for sustainable infrastructure Australia’s first rating scheme for sustainable infrastructure projects can be applied to a broad range of infrastructure types including roads and bridges, ports, harbours and airports, energy infrastructure, water storage and supply, communication transmission and distribution. The Infrastructure Sustainability Rating scheme has been launched by the Australian Green Infrastructure Council and comprises a rating tool, assessment process and education and training programs. It measures the sustainability of infrastructure projects across the triple bottom line of economic, environmental and social criteria. AGIC’s Technical Director, Rick Walters, said during a speech to launch the scheme that the council’s engagement with the infrastructure sector had told it that sustainability was starting to be recognised, but people didn’t know exactly what it was. Mr Walters said wanted the scheme but struggled to describe it in frameworks, specifications and tenders. As a result, many infrastructure developers were “doing their own thing creating inefficiencies across the industry”. He said the sector often operated in silos and didn’t consider the full infrastructure lifecycle, from planning and design, through construction to operation and finally decommissioning or adaptation. Mr Walters said when AGIC was formed in 2008 such issues were becoming more and more evident and the business case was crystallising. He said it was time for the infrastructure industry to at least “do its bit” or “lead the way to help Australia become more sustainable. AGIC commenced creating the scheme with a stakeholder workshop in 2008 where it developed the initial framework. During that year the council appointed a Project Manager, and with initial funding from the New South Wales Government developed the Climate Change Adaptation category in 2010. In September 2010 the council received more funding and started further tool development. It engaged category authors to develop the content of each of the categories and also engaged peer reviewers and a global review panel. By mid-2011, a draft tool was produced ready for initial piloting and two rounds of trials were undertaken between August and December last year. Altogether, 16 projects have been involved in pilot trials – representing a range of infrastructure types, locations, phases and sizes. The Infrastructure Sustainability Rating Scheme is a voluntary sustainability rating scheme incorporating a rating tool. There are 15 categories across 6 broad themes ranging from environmental issues such as energy and carbon, to social issues such as stakeholder participation, to management issues such as procurement and purchasing. There is a process for assessment, independent verification and certification. Mr Walters said while projects or assets could use the tool for self-assessment, they must seek a certified rating from AGIC to gain the right to publicly advertise their rating performance. Importantly, he said, the scheme covered the infrastructure lifecycle, from project to operating asset. 10 ROADS APRIL/MAY 2012 Mr Walters the council offered three rating types: • A Design rating awarded at the end of the design process which assessed the sustainability of the design and the planning for construction. This is an • ’Interim’ rating and must be replaced by an As Built rating after construction. • An As Built rating which assessed the design, the measured sustainability performance during construction and what was built into the infrastructure asset. This rating may be awarded after practical completion of the project. And an Operation rating based on the measured sustainability performance of the operating infrastructure asset. Both new projects and existing infrastructure assets are eligible to apply for an Operation rating. Mr Walters said the scheme used a system of three benchmark levels for each credit providing a “first step in the sustainability journey for some, while also rewarding those who lead the industry”. “IS is designed to be practical; it uses industry language, and it aligns to industry and government processes and requirements. Our Technical Manual provides guidance, and AGIC provides support throughout the assessment process,” he said. Mr Walters said the council believed the scheme provided a range of benefits, including a common national language for sustainability in infrastructure; support for tendering processes; risk and cost reduction; resource efficiency and waste reduction’; innovation and continuous improvement; and reputation building. He said in the longer term, the council looked forward to sustainability being understood as more than just carbon, water and waste. Mr Walters said the council anticipated the long term view becoming the primary focus of decision making – using approaches like lifecycle analysis, whole of life costing and valuing externalities to make the future count. He said AGIC also looked forward to • The whole industry increasingly working together – designers, constructors, operators, owners, supply chains, and customers – and the community as partners. • Infrastructure projects being welcomed by communities because of the benefits • They bring and the open participation they welcome. This resulting in approvals • Being streamlined and a social licence to operate being granted. • Lower costs – in tendering, design, approvals, and lifecycle. • Better value – tenderers competing on an holistic sustainability basis, not just cost. • Better environmental protection – moving to enhance and restore GHG reduction efforts, saving water and other resources. • And greater social benefits – through stakeholder project input, enhancing • livability, causing less disruption, and creating long term legacies.
  13. 13. Citywide... Citywide... Workingthe roads Working the roads less travelled less travelled Responsible for maintaining over 3400 kilometres of regional arterial road network throughout Victoria, Citywide is a leading authority when it comes to providing civil infrastructure services to regional Victoria. Responsible for maintaining over 3400 kilometres of regional arterial road network throughout Victoria, Citywide is acustomers a diverse scope comes to Citywide provides a diverse range of to leading authority when it of works, providing civil infrastructure services Offering regional regional Victoria. includes road stabilisation, gravel road re-sheeting, road profiling, tree pruning, services which traffic management and drainage solutions. Offering regional customers a diverse scope of works, Citywide provides a diverse range of services which includes road stabilisation, gravel road re-sheeting, road profiling, tree pruning, A trusted partner in the growth and development of government and business enterprises, contact trafficCitywide today for more information on our regional civil infrastructure services. management and drainage solutions. To find out more, visit us at and development of call us on 1300 136 234 A trusted partner in the growthwww.citywide.com.au orgovernment and business enterprises, contact Citywide today for more information on our regional civil infrastructure services. To find out more, visit us at www.citywide.com.au or call uswe shape136 234 on 1300 sustainable landscapes Infrastructure Regional Vic Advert.indd 1 Environmental Open Space we shape sustainable landscapes 6/02/2012 3:08:53 PM
  14. 14. MAJOR PROJECTS Airport Link impact on Leighton’s result A downturn in the financial performance of Airport Link (APL) has been identified by Leighton Holdings Limited during the latest quarterly reviews of its operating companies. The deterioration is anticipated to be $148 million before tax for APL. The same reviews also identified a deterioration in the performance of the Victorian Desalination Project (VDP) of $106 million before tax. That represents a total reduction in forecast profit of $254 million before tax which will be reflected in the current financial year to 31 December 2012. Leighton Holdings’ Chief Executive Officer, Hamish Tyrwhitt, said in a statement that he was deeply disappointed with the results which represented a significant deterioration in performance since the December 2011 Quarterly Reviews. “Following the December 2011 Quarterly Reviews, we believed that the operational performances at both the Airport Link and Victorian Desalination Project had stabilised, and that good progress was being made on both projects. “However, circumstances on each project have conspired to bring about the Partnering with road paving businesses Adding value through focus, expertise and innovation Bitumen Polymer Modified Bitumen Bitumen Emulsions Polymer Modified Bitumen Emulsions Recycling Agents Rejuvinating Agents Joint Crack Sealants Precoats Cutbacks Cold Mixes Dust Suppressants Laboratory Testing Services Research Development Projects Sydney Melbourne: ph +61 2 9638 0150 Perth: ph +61 8 9431 7351 Brisbane: Bitumen Import Terminal ph: +61 7 3895 2183 Brisbane PMB/Emulsion plant ph: +61 7 3260 2622 www.samibitumen.com.au 12 ROADS APRIL/MAY 2012 results which are very frustrating. Wet weather in Brisbane, productivity below expectations at both sites combined with the complexity of the commissioning of the integrated systems at APL have seen an unanticipated increase in forecast costs and denied us the level of performance that we were expecting or needed on those projects,” said Mr Tyrwhitt. “The deterioration at APL is, in part, due to the acceleration of the commissioning which started in February and it is now forecast to be more costly than anticipated. Forecast productivity on the site is not being achieved and consequently we are having to substantially increase the size of the workforce to deliver the project. “Unseasonably wet weather since the middle of February has also caused delays which impacted the completion of the construction of the tunnel portals and the access ramps, and delayed the asphalting of the road.” Mr Tyrwhitt said there were some positives on the project. The Northern Busway (Windsor to Kedron) section, which will expand Brisbane’s busway network, was expected to be open on 30 April 2012 in line with the contracted date. A third major element of the project, the Airport Roundabout Upgrade, was completed in February 2011, nine months ahead of schedule. Mr Tyrwhitt said Leighton Holdings was targeting to have Airport Link open to traffic by the middle of the year. “Notwithstanding the disappointing performance of these projects, the Leighton Group has a solid balance sheet, maintains a near record level of work in hand of around $44.5 billion with a healthy level of inherent profitability, and a range of opportunities across our core markets. Given the overall financial position of the Company we have no need to raise capital.”
  15. 15. Latest F5 upgrade widens freeway The $116 million upgrading and widening of Sydney’s F5 Freeway between Brooks and Narellan Roads was completed on time and within budget. The project was officially completed and opened to traffic on March 26. Overall, the F5 Freeway extends south from the M5/M7 interchange at Prestons. Widening the 11 kilometre section of the F5 between Brooks Road, Ingleburn and Narellan Road, Blair Athol commenced in February 2009. The project was completed in three stages. Stage 1 involved widening to four lanes in each direction between Brooks Road and St Andrews Road. This work commenced in February 2009 and was completed in June 2011. Stage 2 focused on widening to four lanes in each direction between St Andrews Road and Raby Road. This work commenced in June 2009 and was completed in December 2011. The third and final stage involved widening to three lanes in each direction between Raby Road and Narellan Road. Work commenced in September 2010 and was completed in March 2012. The widening was a jointly funded project, with the Federal Government contributing $93 million and the NSW Government a further $23 million. Over the life of the project some 135 construction jobs were created. NSW Roads Minister, Duncan Gay, said as part of the forward thinking and planning that went into the project, the builders installed sensors and cabling which would form the backbone of a future electronic management system. Mr Gay said the new technology would help prevent congestion and give motorists real-time traffic information. “Lastly, nearby residents weren’t forgotten either,” Mr Gay said. “Not only have additional sound barriers been installed, but a new pedestrian/cycle bridge connecting the suburbs of Claymore and Woodbine was erected over the F5.” The project was in addition to widening of the F5 from four to eight lanes between Camden Valley Way and Brooks Road — a project that commenced in April 2005 and was completed in August 2008. The new lanes were built in 2 stages in what was previously the central median area. This project was jointly funded by the NSW and Federal Governments. 1000 AT WORK Improving road access to port of Esperance Construction has started on a $120 million project which will improve access to the rapidly expanding port of Esperance in Western Australia. The Esperance Port Access Corridor project will simplify the road and rail connections to the Port by realigning Harbour Road and replacing two existing level crossings with overpasses. Once completed in late 2013, the work will improve the movement of goods and freight into and out of the port as well as make it easier for locals to get around Esperance, particularly when trains are passing through. With one of the deepest harbours in southern Australia, Esperance Port is critical to the national economy. Each year more than 200 ships pass through it carrying over 11 million tonnes of nickel, iron ore and grain exports as well as imports of fuel and fertilisers. Those volumes are set to grow in the years ahead. The Port Access project is being delivered by John Holland Pty Ltd with funding from both the Federal Government ($60 million) and the WA Government ($60 million). Federal Infrastructure Minister, Anthony Albanese, was on hand to mark the start of construction and also to announce Federal Funding of $2 million to the PortLink Inland Freight Corridor Plan. Mr Albanese described the freight corridor plan as “a long-talked about proposal with the potential to transform the region and open up access to the vast wealth which lies beneath the ground across this remote part of the country”. Mr Albanese said if given the final go ahead, the project would establish Kalgoorlie as a hub linking together the ports of Port Hedland, Freemantle, Esperance, Geraldton and the M SERIES proposed Oakajee facility. “The funding I’m announcing will go towards the planning and scoping study which will assess the possible road and rail alignment options, undertake the necessary economic and financial modelling as well as determine the operational and technical feasibility of an intermodal facility,” Mr Albany said. “Given the proposal’s complexity and the amount of investment that ultimately would be required, we are determined to do our homework and to getting the planning right from the very outset.” The Federal Government is investing $3.7 billion over six years into WA’s road and rail infrastructure. M SERIES Around Australia, one thousand Cat ® M Series Motor Graders are being put to work. To find out more about M Series Motor Graders, contact your local Cat dealer or visit www.australia.cat.com/mseries © 2012 Caterpillar. CAT, CATERPILLAR, their respective logos, “Caterpillar Yellow,” the “Power Edge” trade dress as well as corporate and product identity used herein, are trademarks of Caterpillar and may not be used without permission.
  16. 16. MAJOR PROJECTS Builders shortlisted for Pacific Highway duplication Three construction companies have been short listed for the rebuilding of the Pacific Highway from Frederickton to Eungai in New South Wales. Abigroup Contractors; Leighton Contractors; and the Thiess/ McMahon Joint Venture were selected by NSW Roads and Maritime Services after submitting bids for the design and build project. The upgrade of the Frederickton to Eungai section will involve duplicating 26.5 kilometres of road as well as building a new interchange at Stuarts Point Road and installing safe, modern rest areas on both sides of the Highway at Cooks Lane south of Barraganyatti. Construction is expected to commence in 2013 and be completed in 2015. In addition, three companies were shortlisted for a contract to undertake the detailed planning and design work on the section of highway between Woolgoolga to Glenugie. The consortiums bidding for the plan and design contract are the ARUP/Parsons Brinckerhoff Joint Venture; the SMEC/Hyder Consulting Joint Venture; and the AECOM/Sinclair Knight Merz Joint Venture. The subsequent Woolgoolga to Glenugie upgrade will see a further 31 kilometres of highway duplicated as well as construction of an interchange at Range Road, two new overpasses and bridges over Corindi Creek and the nearby floodplains. Construction is expected to commence in 2015 and to be completed by late 2016. Image courtesy www.roadtraffic-technology.com All those shortlisted are submitting detailed tenders and contracts for both projects will be awarded later this year. In other Pacific Highway construction work, the final stage of the Glenugie upgrade has been officially opened, marking completion of the $60 million project. The seven kilometre upgraded section is about 15 kilometres south of Grafton and the road surface used on the project is heavy duty crushed rock with a sprayed seal wearing surface. The surface is new on Pacific Highway upgrades and is being used as a trial to assess if it is suitable for future upgrades in areas with lighter traffic. Sixty percent of Melbourne’s M80 now being improved The next section of the $2.25 billion M80 Ring Road Upgrade is underway in Melbourne’s north. More than 140,000 drivers use the M80 Ring Road daily making it Melbourne’s second busiest freeway. The six kilometre stretch involved in the latest upgrade is between Edgars Road, Thomastown and Plenty Road, Bundoora. When completed in mid-2014, the section will have three lanes in each direction to significantly reduce congestion and improve safety. Between interchanges there will also be an additional lane in each direction to minimise the congestion impacts of vehicles entering and exiting the freeway from adjacent interchanges. The latest works add to the 16 kilometres of construction already underway between the Western 14 ROADS APRIL/MAY 2012 Highway and Sunshine Avenue, and from the Calder Freeway to Sydney Road. Around 60% of the Ring Road is now being improved and new lanes are due to open later this year on other sections of the Ring Road. When completed, the improved freeway with extra lanes and better access will help ease congestion, and reduce travel times and costs for commuters, and importantly for the road freight industry, with 20,000 trucks currently using the Ring Road each day. Across the 38 kilometre corridor, the upgrade will also bring improvements to key interchanges and a state-of-the-art electronic freeway management system. The Federal Government has invested $900m in the upgrade to date, along with $300m from the Victorian Government.
  17. 17. UNMATCHED New generation noise wall for parts of Peninsula Link In what is described as first for Victoria, the Peninsula Link project will feature a new type of noise wall made from polyethylene, a heavy duty plastic that offers environmental and local benefits. The $759 million Peninsula Link project is a 27 kilometre freeway from Carrum Downs to Mt Martha in Melbourne’s south east. It connects three major freeways and will transform the way people travel around Frankston and the Mornington Peninsula. The “poly walls” that will be used have greater flexibility in design which means they can display patterns on both sides of the walls, offering visual relief for adjacent properties. The panels are locally manufactured, are made from a portion of recycled plastic and have a lower carbon footprint during the manufacturing process than other noise wall materials, such as concrete. Their non-porous nature makes them far more resistant to graffiti and easier to maintain. Construction contractor, Abigroup, has undertaken a rigorous noise modelling process which determines where noise walls need to be placed to meet Victorian standards for reducing road traffic disturbance. The poly noise wall panels will feature along the freeway in sections of Frankston and Baxter while oxidised steel walls or mounds will be used in other sections. In other developments, asphalting work has been underway on the motorway since mid-February. The majority of the asphalting is expected to be completed by mid-2012 and VISIBILITY Oxidised steel wall. Image courtesy www.peninsulalink.com.au Geology wall. Image courtesy www.peninsulalink.com.au the final wearing course is due to be laid just prior to completion in early 2013. Boral Asphalt (Victoria) is managing the production of asphalt at a temporary plant in Langwarrin, which is expected to employ 60 people and produce around 380,000 tonnes of asphalt. The close proximity of the plant to the project is minimising truck movements on local roads and ensuring the asphalt is still hot when it reaches its destination. The asphalt plant has recycling capabilities allowing asphalt from old roads to be reused. Project company, Southern Way, is using a special type of asphalt mix which has road safety and noise reduction benefits. The project is using Open Graded asphalt which enhances contact between tyres and the road, improving skid resistance and reducing the level of traffic noise from the freeway. M SERIES M SERIES Cat ® M Series Motor Graders To find out more about M Series Motor Graders, contact your local Cat dealer or visit www.australia.cat.com/mseries Text wall © 2012 Caterpillar. CAT, CATERPILLAR, their respective logos, “Caterpillar Yellow,” the “Power Edge” trade dress as well as corporate and product identity used herein, are trademarks of Caterpillar and may not be used without permission.
  18. 18. NEWS Widening of Northbridge Tunnel and Mitchell Freeway Northbridge Tunnel. Image courtesy www.yourcott.com.au www.placeleaders.com Works valued at $57 million will begin soon in Perth to accommodate a third traffic lane in the Graham Farmer Freeway tunnel and increase lane capacity on the Mitchell Freeway. The works will provide an alternative eastwest route for CBD traffic; adjust merging arrangements onto Mitchell Freeway; and redirect traffic exiting at Vincent and Powis streets to manage the impact of major projects such as the Perth Waterfront development. 002 Genuine Parts - Nuts about our Bolts_124x182mm.indd 1 16 ROADS APRIL/MAY 2012 Main Roads WA started consulting in March with the road construction industry about procurement options to deliver the works, set to be completed within the next two years. State Transport Minister, Troy Buswell, said the government was overseeing the most significant transformation of the CBD in decades and it was inevitable that key redevelopment projects such as the Perth Waterfront, Perth City Link and Riverside would change the way traffic moved in the city. “The State Government is planning accordingly to develop transport solutions to improve the operation of the CBD road network and address the challenge of Perth’s increasing population. “Perth Waterfront is one of the most significant developments in Australia and will see Riverside Drive realigned to allow traffic to flow into Barrack and William streets. “Although traffic will still flow around the development, traffic modelling on the impact of the diversion on Graham Farmer Freeway indicates an additional 14,500 vehicles per day will be redirected through the tunnel, and it is the intention that work on the tunnel will be complete and operational before Riverside Drive is diverted.” Associated work would include: • Increased lane capacity onto Mitchell Freeway to two lanes at the existing northbound merge point; • The widening of Mitchell Freeway traffic bridges over Powis and Vincent streets and • Scarborough Beach Road; and • Construction of an on-ramp from the Loftus Street exit on to Mitchell Freeway. Treasurer, Christian Porter, said with a growing population, the government was conscious of the need to ease congestion constraints on roads and build capacity for the future. “The funds being set aside in the 2012–13 State Budget for this project are in addition to $30million provided in last year’s Budget to widen the northbound carriageway of the Mitchell Freeway between Hepburn Avenue and Hodges Drive, and the $241million the government has provided to build the northern suburbs rail extension to Butler.” Works on Graham Farmer Freeway tunnel begin in July 2012 and are expected to be finished by May 2013, with the additional freeway works to be completed by November 2013. 6/07/2011 12:08:44 PM
  19. 19. Fewer truck movements at Port Botany BEST IN CLASS OPERATOR STATION Increased rail capacity at DP World’s Port Botany Terminal in New South Wales is contributing to State Government plans to dramatically reduce truck movements through the port and reduce pressure on local roads, according to Ports Minister, Duncan Gay. An expansion of rail yards at DP World’s Port Botany terminal has the potential to increase rail moves by 500 a week or 26,000 a year. “If you equate that to truck movements it means up to 20,000 trucks a year off the roads and that would have a big impact on traffic around the port,” Mr Gay said. “DP World agreed to maximise the efficiency of its rail supply chain as part of its lease with Sydney Ports and it’s delivering on that agreement. The creation of a dual rail entryexit point into the terminal and the new third operational rail siding will provide greater rail productivity in the terminal as multiple trains can be worked with equipment from both sides at the same time. “DP World is now able to accommodate longer trains in its rail yard without hindering the arrival and exit of other trains and that’s a big increase in efficiency,” Mr Gay said. “When you consider that 85% of containers originate from, or are bound for, a destination within 40 kilometres of Port Botany, it is imperative that new rail freight infrastructure is built to reduce the impact on local roads.” Mr Gay said Sydney Ports Corporation, through the multi-stakeholder Port Botany Rail Team, was committed to supporting the NSW Government’s goal of doubling the amount of freight moved by rail by 2021. “A major part of that strategy is the development of the $300-million rail Intermodal Logistics Centre at Enfield which will have the potential to handle 300,000 containers a year. When that facility is operational next year, we’ll be a big step closer to reaching that 28% target, Mr Gay said. Scott Emerson allocated Queensland Roads portfolio The Minister for Transport and Main Roads in Queensland’s Liberal National Party Government is Scott Emerson – a former leading journalist and MP for the seat of Indooroopilly in Brisbane’s west. Mr Emerson was Shadow Minister for Transport before the election on March 24 which saw the LNP oust the Labor Government in a landslide result. He was first elected to the Queensland Parliament at the 2009 election and was appointed a member of the Parliamentary Crime and Misconduct Committee. M SERIES In May 2010, Emerson was appointed as the inaugural Chairperson of the Waste Watch Committee, an Opposition campaign aimed at identifying and ending what it described as Labor Government waste in Queensland. He held this position until November 2010. He was then elevated to the Shadow Ministry becoming Queensland’s first Shadow Minister for Science, Research and Information, and Communication Technology. In April 2011, Emerson was appointed to the senior position of Shadow Minister for Transport, Multicultural Affairs and Arts. M SERIES Cat ® M Series Motor Graders To find out more about M Series Motor Graders, contact your local Cat dealer or visit www.australia.cat.com/mseries © 2012 Caterpillar. CAT, CATERPILLAR, their respective logos, “Caterpillar Yellow,” the “Power Edge” trade dress as well as corporate and product identity used herein, are trademarks of Caterpillar and may not be used without permission.
  20. 20. News Upgrade of key link road in Melbourne’s south east Construction has started on the $55.6 million Clyde Road upgrade at Berwick in Melbourne’s south east, with works commencing on a dual divided carriageway from High Street to Kangan Drive. Clyde Road is a key north-south link from the Princes Freeway to residential and commercial areas in and around Berwick township and carries more than 18,000 vehicles each day. The Federal Government has committed $30 million and the Victorian Government $25.6 million to the project. BMD Constructions is VicRoads’ contractor with works expected to be completed by late 2013. By completing the Clyde Road upgrade, the reliability of bus journeys will be improved and travel times will be decreased by up to 20%. Contract awarded for Yeppen Road Upgrade The works will improve safety and assist traffic flow by separating turning vehicles from through traffic, and will improve access to nearby businesses, shops, schools, child care and health facilities. The upgrade will involve remodelling signalling at intersections, putting in pedestrian facilities in the form of pedestrian phases at the intersections and providing separate bicycle facilities along both sides of Clyde Road. More than 90 advanced oak trees are being planted along Clyde Road as part of landscaping to replicate and enhance the boulevard feel. Following consultation with the local community, Casey Council and other key stakeholders, most of the trees on the east side have been retained. The $85 million Yeppen North project in Queensland will be constructed by Fulton Hogan. The project is scheduled to begin in mid-2012 and to be completed in early 2014. It will deliver significant upgrades over a two kilometre stretch. It will include: • A new slip lane for traffic entering Rockhampton from Gracemere, reducing congestion and delays at the roundabout; • Speed reduction curves at all roundabout approaches to reduce the likelihood of accident and heavy vehicle rollover on some approaches; • Expansion of the roundabout to two lanes between the Yeppen Bridge entry and Capricorn Highway exit to increase capacity; • A new 420 metre Yeppen Bridge downstream of the existing structure – the new two-lane bridge will be dedicated to outbound traffic; • Both lanes of the existing bridge will be dedicated to inbound vehicles; Upper Dawson Road and Jellicoe Street intersection upgraded to traffic signals and expanded to cater for oversize loads; and Reconfiguration of Port Curtis Road Intersection to be left-in-left-out to address safety and visibility concerns. The Federal Government is contributing $68 million to the project and the Queensland Government $17 million. This ready to use pre-mix bituminous mixture is manufactured from selective aggregates, bitumen and a co-polymer creating a tenacious bonding material for permanent use and repairs. Asphalt in a B ag i s an a ll w eather road repair solution. I t can b e applied at - 26 degrees Celcius and will perform just as well during hot and rainy days at temperatures reaching 49 degrees Celcius. � 7949278AA . 18 ROADS APRIL/MAY 2012
  21. 21. Smarter, Faster up to10% Less Fuel! TIER 4 CERTIFIED 40 Used 37% More 35 Used 20% More Litres of Fuel per Hour 30 Increased fuel efficiency during boom operation. Improved fuel efficiency when joysticks are in neutral. 25 Automatic pressure adjustments save fuel during digging and levelling operations. 20 Auto Idle and Idle Shutdown provides additional fuel savings. 15 10 P BEC – BOOM ECONOMY CONTROL P AEC – AUTOMATIC ECONOMY CONTROL P SSC – SPOOL STROKE CONTROL P IMS – IDLE MANAGEMENT SYSTEM P SWC – SWING RELIEF CONTROL Case CX300C Cat 325DL Komatsu PC270LC-8 Manages the hydraulic power distribution for most efficient flow and pressure while slewing. CLASS-LEADING ECONOMY Call your local dealer on 1300 99 CASE SUPERIOR | RELIABILITY FUEL EFFICIENCY OPERATOR ENVIRONMENT SERVICEABILITY www.caseconstruction.com.au Testing conducted in USA by independent operators. Consistent operations were used for all tests; machines were operated at full load and full fuel for each test; operation duration 30 minutes to pre-determined depth for each testing machine. Calculated CX300C fuel savings in comparison to CX290B. ROADS APRIL/MAY 2012 19
  22. 22. News More research on viability of RCG in road construction Proposals to improve Stirling Highway Research and development projects into the use of recovered crushed glass (RCG) in roads has given councils and contractors the confidence to use the material as a durable and cost effective alternative to natural sand, according to the Packaging Stewardship Forum of the Australian Food and Grocery Council. National Program Manager for the Packaging Stewardship Forum, Chris Jeffreys, said over 25,000 tonnes of waste glass was diverted from landfill in the past year into civil construction projects. Mr Jeffries said AusTox, an independent consultancy specialising in chemical safety, undertook a risk assessment into the safety in use of RCG to identify suitable controls and to prepare a Materials Safety Data Sheet on RCG for users. He said the study addressed concerns raised about the possible risks of using RCG in roads. It found that RCG was not toxic, there were no sharp edges to the final product and it reduced the risk of silicosis compared to natural sand. Mr Jeffries said in addition, research by GHD Geotechnics on RCG samples showed it exceeded the minimum degradation factor requirements for roads, while modulus testing showed RCG was a stronger aggregate than natural sand. Its inclusion as a percentage in the asphalt mix would not impact on the life expectancy of the pavement. Mr Jeffries said demonstration projects using RCG in asphalt roads in NSW, Victoria, Western Australia and Tasmania had established that RCG mixed with natural sand in road surfaces performed equally as well as “regular” asphalt. He said there were now several suppliers in the Australian market that produced and used asphalt containing RCG. Stirling Highway, Cottesloe Image courtesy www.yourcott.com.au The Western Australian Government has released for public comment an amendment to the Metropolitan Region Scheme designed to improve the Stirling Highway over the next 20 years. Stirling Highway’s configuration will remain two lanes each way, but the amendment proposes some adjustment to the current road reservation which will help better meet local traffic needs into the future. The amendment identifies more than 25 hectares of private land that is surplus to highway requirements, which iscurrently included in the roadreservation, and it proposes to rezone the land to remove restrictions on future development. State Planning Minister, John Day, said the amendment was an opportunity for the public to comment on transport planning and the long-term design of the highway – the historical link between Perth and Fremantle. Mr Day said it would allow for improved road safety focusing on pedestrian, cyclist and public transport amenity, and provide consistent planning guidance across seven local councils for the next two decades. Warrego Highway masterplan Award winning patented modular bridge construction systems Unibridge over the Brisbane River, Somerset Regional Council • • • • • • Universal bridges Certified to Australian load specifications Permanent and short term uses Innovative and versatile Easy and rapid installation Minimal maintenance Unibridge Australasia Pty Ltd Level 7, 263 Clarence Street Sydney NSW 2000 Phone +61 (0)2 9427 0880 Mobile +61(0)433 881 180 Fax +61 (0)2 9427 7397 Email info@unibridge.net.au Web www.unibridge.net.au 20 ROADS APRIL/MAY 2012 MAT6665 To find out more about Unibridge®, visit www.unibridge.net.au or email info@unibridge.net.au Upgrading of the Warrego Highway in Queensland will be carried out under a 20-year Warrego Highway Upgrade Strategy. The highway is the secondhighest trafficked rural highway in Queensland, carrying more than 23,000 vehicles between Ipswich and Toowoomba and over 5,000 vehicles between Oakey and Dalby each day. The number of vehicles is expected to more than double over the next 20 years. The upgrade strategy includes the construction of the Toowoomba Bypass, extra overtaking lanes, upgraded intersections and widened stretches of road. It identifies 41 priorities to improve safety, capacity, efficiency, reliability and flood immunity. The highway had long been critical to southern and southwestern communities, and will continue to play a key role in the economic development of the state as the energy sector in the Surat Basin gathers. The Queensland and Federal governments have already committed over $160 million to the Warrego Highway for projects such as a new interchange with the Brisbane Valley Highway junction at Blacksoil, new overtaking lanes between Oakey and Dalby, a new bridge across the Maranoa River at Mitchell and upgrade of the Lockyer Creek Bridge at Helidon. The State Government has also committed a further $164 million for urgent works including safety improvements between Ipswich and Withcott, stage one of duplication between Toowoomba and Oakey, intersection upgrades in Toowoomba and improving the Macalister to Warra section.
  23. 23. ADVERTORIAL 25th ARRB Conference 2012 Registration and program highlights For 50 years, ARRB Conferences has promoted discussion of issues relevant to the transport industry, and new research being undertaken on the local and international scene. ARRB is hosting the 25th ARRB Conference in Perth, 23-26 September 2012, immediately prior to the 35th Australasian Transport Research Forum (ATRF), 26-28 September at the same location. The theme of the Conference is Shaping the future: Linking research, policy and outcomes. The conference will explore how the outputs of transport research support informed decision-making and policy formulation, leading to community enhancements in areas including efficiency, sustainability, safety and accessibility. Both the ARRB and the ATRF conferences will share a joint session day on Wednesday 26 September. Program highlights ARRB, and conference platinum sponsor Main Roads Western Australia, is pleased to announce the three main plenary topics: Improve productivity or perish! Australia depends heavily on road freight. It is a world leader in road freight productivity, but that will not continue if it does not make improvements. This session will explore the need for change to improve productivity, from the perspective of the transport industry and the community, and what actions are needed to meet these challenges. Balancing sustainability, road safety, network performance and community expectations Balancing road safety and sustainability objectives (including environmental issues) is challenging, although an essential part of road network management. This session will build on the themes covered at the previous ARRB Conference and will explore: • how the road transport system can be managed to optimise environmental and road safety outcomes (including emissions in the transport sector); • how the road transport system can be managed to optimise network operations and asset management within a Safe Systems context; and • network and policy implications. Shaping cities: The role of transport planning in the future Many capital cities face challenges in staying or becoming liveable and accessible cities for all. As a result, it is critical that development planning addresses issues such as climate change, sustainability, population growth and social and cultural diversity. This session, held on the ARRB-ATRF joint day, will highlight the changing role of transport planning in facilitating the needs of growing city in the 21st century by focussing on recent major projects in Perth. Technical tours will be held on Sunday 23 September. Details will be available on the Conference website www.arrb.com.au/conferences . Welcome reception will be held on the Sunday at the Pan Pacific Hotel. The Welcome reception is sponsored by SIDRA SOLUTIONS. Conference dinner will be held on 24 September at the Burswood Convention Centre (Astral room) and the Interchange function will be held on 25 September at the Royal Perth Yacht Club. You can register online now at www.arrb.com.au/conferences Technical enquiries: Lydia Chong, Conference Technical Secretary, on P: +61 3 9881 1555 or 25conf@arrb.com.au Register now! Earlybird savings until 17 August 2012 23-26 September 2012 Pan Pacific Hotel Perth, Western Australia The 25th ARRB Conference will focus on research outcomes which address emerging issues affecting the road and transport industry, and the global community. Topics will include: • Congestion, freight productivity • Safe Systems - road safety engineering - road user behaviour - road design - traffic management - safe vehicles - transport network - transport planning - economics - freight logistics - innovative heavy vehicle solutions - environment sustainability • Sustainable infrastructure management • Sustainable infrastructure sciences/technology - pavement design performance - pavement construction/maintenance - materials technology - concrete structures - sprayed sealing Conference sponsored by: Endorsed by: - innovative inventory solutions - infrastructure assessment - asset management - bridge management - infrastructure maintenance - local roads. For more information visit www.arrb.com.au/conferences or call: Marketing and Sponsorship Coordinator: Briarlea Green, ph: 61 3 9881 1676 Exhibition Assistant: Alana Cox, ph: 61 3 9881 1560 Email: sponsorconf@arrb.com.au ROADS APRIL/MAY 2012 21
  24. 24. ADVERTORIAL Broons eCombi Rroller – three years on It is now just three years since international crushing and compaction specialists, Broons, released its eCombi roller. Designed specifically for the patrol grading and resheeting of unsealed roads, the first purchaser was Wakefield Regional Council in South Australia. Since that time the council has grown its fleet of eCombi’s to four – two of the standard smooth drum units and two with the vibrating drum option. And, it is pleased with how the units have “done the job” over the journey. The eCombi compacts freshly graded surfaces with its centrally mounted steel roll drum or single row of smooth tread compactor tyres on the rear that can be hydraulically raised or lowered to suit the application of the machine. An optional vibrating roll drum can be fitted in lieu of the standard static weight version. A sign rack, cutting edge holder and spare wheel have been integrated into the design if required by the client. By introducing the eCombi to its range of specialist crushing and compaction equipment, Broons filled a niche in the market for an economical patrol grading roller that keeps the features of its proven Combination Roller, but is cheaper to ease the strain on council budgets. The eCombi is simple to use and operator-friendly. The change from roll drum to tyres and back is easily controlled hydraulically from the cabin of the grader or tow tractor. The eCombi has a compaction width of two metres on the roll drum and slightly wider on the tyres. The roll drum is 25mm thick and can be ballasted with water to increase its weight and compaction pressure. Fully ballasted the operating weight of the eCombi is around eight tonnes. The static linear load of the smooth drum is close to 35kg/cm or 900kg/tyre when ballasted. Further details can be obtained from Broons on (08) 8268 1988; e-mail at info@broons.com or at www.broons.com RUGGED ROAD MACHINES Call now (08) 8268 1988 22 ROADS APRIL/MAY 2012 | Fax (08) 8268 1576 | info@broons.com | www.broons.com/ecombi
  25. 25. ROADS APRIL/MAY 2012 23
  26. 26. ADVERTORIAL Kirpy Road Rippers now in Australia Rural road construction, rehabilitation and re-sheeting is an integral part of council work throughout Australia and a tough, reliable tractormounted ripper can be a handy tool in a council fleet in lieu of using and expensive grader. International crushing and compaction specialists, Broons, has been marketing the Kirpy range of rock crushers in Australasia for over a decade and it has now introduced Kirpy’s super tough NS Road Ripper to complement the range of crushers. Kirpy is celebrating 100 years’ in engineering machinery in 2012 and it’s used all of this experience in developing the new NS Road Ripper. Designed specifically for rough use on roads, the machine has many features that make it a standout performer in any shire council fleet. It can be fitted to the tractor three-point linkage on either the front or the rear and has a heavily reinforced main frame to take the punishment of ripping hard road pavements embedded with large rocks. The Ripper has seven tynes that are also forged from high quality steel bar to ensure strength and durability, and they can rip to a depth of half a metre. The forged tynes are what sets the machine apart from the competition. Each tyne is hand forged from a single steel bar and has a replaceable cast boot on the bottom making it the strongest on the market. Continuing the theme of strength and reliability, the Ripper also has an additional leaf in each spring to enable it to rip effectively in the toughest ground. With a working width of 2.5 metres it will be easily towed by a 120HP (90kW) tractor and minimal maintenance is required. Boons’ Director, Stuart Bowes, said that bringing the Kirpy Ripper into Australia meant the company had become a one-stop shop for road construction and maintenance machines. “It is now possible to rip the pavement with a Ripper, crush the rock with a Kirpy Rock Crusher, compact the base with a Vibrating or Combination Roller, and finish the surface with an eCombi Roller or Handy Hitch Roller.” Broons is the Australasian distributor for the Kirpy range and three model Kirpy machines – the BPB200, the BPB250 and the larger WX300 – are also well suited to road construction. For further information phone (08) 8268 1988; e-mail info@broons.com or go to www.broons.com. ROAD RIPPER Call now (08) 8268 1988 24 ROADS APRIL/MAY 2012 | Fax (08) 8268 1576 | info@broons.com | www.broons.com /kirpy_ripper/
  27. 27. ADVERTORIAL 1000 Cat® M Series on…and the innovation continues In 1931, Caterpillar introduced the first rubber tyred motor grader. Eighty-one years later, they’ve just rolled out their 11,000th M Series Motor Grader worldwide and their 1000th M Series Motor Grader in Australia. The development of the Cat M Series Motor Grader is one of the most significant new product rollouts in Caterpillar history and is underpinned by a long commitment to improvement, innovation and customer insight. “We launched the first M Series Motor Graders in Australia in 2007,” explains Darren Hodge, Motor Grader Product Application Specialist for Caterpillar Global Construction and Infrastructure. “Since then we’ve sold over 1000 machines here. To obtain this result in just a few years tells us we’ve got it right and that operators are comfortable with the innovations and improvements we’ve made to the motor graders over the years.” “Building on the strong heritage of the H Series, the M Series delivers multiple and innovative technological breakthroughs, setting the new standard for motor graders. “We have a history of listening closely to our customers,” adds Hodge. “Since introducing the M Series we’ve instituted a raft of class leading innovations as a result of client consultation. Such enhancements include; more cabin storage, electronically adjustable arm rest control pods, articulation rod guards, blade lift sensitivity selectable modes, and front axle steering cylinder hose guards. We remain committed to making incremental changes to further enhance our machines and our customers businesses. “Yes,” continues Hodge, “it was a bold move for Caterpillar to significantly change the way motor graders had been controlled and operated for many years. But we didn’t do it lightly. We engaged in an intensive amount of testing and validation of the product during development. We spoke with our customers worldwide and took on board their needs and suggestions. The response to the machine is a testament to this customer research and provides confirmation from owners and operators that we have developed a machine that delivers in the important buying criteria of comfort, control and visibility; performance and productivity; reliability, easier maintenance, safety, and lower cost of ownership.” Looking closely at the M Series, the dedication to operator comfort and enhanced productivity is immediately apparent. Most obvious is the inclusion of joystick controls for complete machine operation. Two joysticks offer precise control and ease of operation. This revolutionary technology has markedly increased operator comfort and control, with the potential for greater productivity. It provides complete steering and transmission control. Operators consistently report significantly reduced muscle fatigue, lessened hand/wrist movement and more precise steering. Hand and wrist movement is significantly reduced compared to conventional lever controls. An articulation return-to-straight feature allows for quick and simple turns, further increasing operator comfort. “The joystick controls have been a major hit” enthuses Hodge. “Operators are exiting the machines with a big smile even after 12 hours on the job. In fact, more often than not after some time operating the M Series, operators are saying they wouldn’t like to go back to traditional machine controls. The productivity and comfort increases that owners are reporting back to us are significant.” But it’s not just the innovative operator controls that make the operator experience exceptional. A lot of work and intensive engineering has been put into the design of the cabin with regard to visibility. The new M Series cab has opened up new sight lines to all the important areas of operation allowing for better visibility and reduced movement by the operator. Visibility of the blade toe/heel and front tandem wheels is significantly enhanced. The blade/linkage arms have also been redesigned to allow for better visibility. All of these changes add to operator comfort levels and have resulted, according to feedback, in increased driver satisfaction and decreased operator fatigue. The drawbar, circle and mouldboard (DCM) components and linkages can be easily and quickly adjusted without technical expertise, to ensure exact blade positioning. ROADS APRIL/MAY 2012 25
  28. 28. ADVERTORIAL In addition to the above mentioned improvements, drivers also enjoy the comfort of integrated heating and air conditioning, with a fresh air filter located outside the cab at ground level. The cab is also isolation mounted which reduces vibration and noise. Interior sound levels are extremely low, resulting in the M Series being one of the quietest machines on the market. Then there’s the unique AWD system with steering compensation. Independent AWD pumps to each front drive motor provide differentiated inner/outer wheel speeds when turning. This reduces the turning circle in poor underfoot conditions. The exclusive steering compensation system enables a “powered turn” by adjusting the outside front tyre speed up to 50% faster than the inside tyre. In addition, when the AWD system is engaged, the flywheel horsepower is also automatically increased. This gross power increase offsets the parasitic losses associated with the AWD system and maximises the net power to the ground for increased performance and productivity. But just because the operator experience is much more comfortable doesn’t mean the M Series grader is any less powerful. “The 140M provides higher engine horsepower in all gears” explains Hodge. “This is an imposing workhorse on any site. It’s also highly visible in just about any environment.” Of note, is that for all its power, the Cat M Series is also extremely precise in its exact blade positioning for cutting and spreading. “For motor graders, when it comes to a quality finished surface, it’s all about the blade cutting and spreading to within very fine tolerances,” Hodge continues. “They also need to ensure efficient power to the ground at the right gear speed. The blade, part of the complex drawbar, circle and mouldboard (DCM) component linkage has up to nine areas of potential wear that can impact the quality and productivity of completing the finished grade. “The good news is the M Series is designed with low and easy maintenance in mind. The DCM components and linkages can be easily and quickly adjusted without necessary technical expertise. These components that are critical for exact blade positioning include sacrificial wear components to ensure parent iron is not worn. These wear items prevent costly downtime and the expense of returning the DCM to tight tolerance in the linkages for finish grading. “Such attention to adjustment accessibility is testament to the Caterpillar commitment to ensuring limited downtime for owners and operators. 26 ROADS APRIL/MAY 2012 “We know downtime costs our clients real money” says Hodge. “Part of our ongoing commitment to them is that we will continue to develop world renowned graders that stay on the job for longer with improved productivity and efficiency levels.” A significant contributor to this ongoing commitment is to build safer machines. “Our dedication to safety is second to none,” adds Hodge. “There is simply no greater incentive to us as a company than to make sure our customers are as safe and secure as they are productive. “We don’t just look at the obvious safety measures either,” Hodge explains. “Virtually everything we do impacts upon safety, from making the operator more comfortable and thus more able to concentrate on the task at hand, to providing exceptional cost of ownership benefits so owners can feel confident investing in their machines on an ongoing basis.” Significant machine safety inclusions comprise; Operator Presence System (park brake will automatically engage and hydraulics will be neutralised if operator is not seated), secondary steering, isolation mounted ROPS/FOPS structure, speed sensitive steering and hydraulic lockout. Caterpillar’s commitment to safety is paramount. Multiple back-up systems have been designed into the machine’s steering system for redundancy in the joystick control signals and wiring harness. In addition, there is an infinitely variable ratio between the joystick and the steer tyres as machine speed increases or decreases, and audible/visual alarms to warn the operator in the event of system component problems. “For more than 10 years Cat Motor Graders have been the benchmark and market leader in Australia with over 65% share of all motor graders sold,” concludes Hodge. “Worldwide, over 11,000 of them work a combined average of over one million hours per month. We see this as a testament to the machine’s acceptance, durability and reliability. It also delivers us an enormous amount of real life testing and feedback from just about every type of grading job you could possibly imagine. This collective experience and know-how enables us to continually make incremental improvements and refined enhancements to these class leading machines.” For more information about Cat M Series Motor Graders, contact your local Cat dealer or visit www.australia.cat.com/mseries
  29. 29. 1000 AT WORK M SERIES M SERIES
  30. 30. 1000 M SERIES WORKING FOR AUSTRALIANS ONE THOUSAND M Stephen Catalano – B J Catalano, WA B J Catalano was established in Western Australia in 1962 by brothers Bill and Joe Catalano. Since then it has grown to be a highly successful company, with over 350 employees and a fleet of over 210 Cat® machines. Joe’s son Clem and Bill’s son Stephen Catalano work alongside Bill to oversee the day-to-day operations of the business. “We bought our first Cat Motor Grader in 1966 – a 12E, then in 1974 purchased a 14G which we still own to this day. Bill will tell you it runs as good today as it did when he bought it 37 years ago. “Then in 2007 we bought our first M Series, a 140M, and in 2009 purchased our first 16M. Surveyors put all the data required into the grader and the operators run it through the machine guidance AccuGrade™ system. “Purchasing the first M Series with the joysticks wasn’t a problem because our grader operator Vince had operated Cat joystick loaders before.” Around Australia, there are now one thousand Cat® M Series Motor Graders being put to work. We’re proud of this milestone but remain focused on continuing to deliver technology innovations that make operators more comfortable, worksites more productive and businesses more profitable. M SERIES M SERIES “I was still a bit hesitant,” adds Vince with a smile. “I’d been driving the G Series up until then and I thought the M Series might be a bit too much of a jump. But after sitting in it for a few weeks, it actually started to feel really natural. It’s a very driver friendly machine in my opinion.” “In fact now we can’t get you out of it!” laughs Stephen. “Yeah, I’d definitely find it hard to go back to the older machine,” agrees Vince. “For a start, the visibility of the M Series is far greater than the G Series or H Series. It’s also a lot
  31. 31. SERIES. ONE THOUSAND STORIES. HERE’S JUST A FEW. Jeff Schwarz Andrew Challen – Schwarz Excavations, QLD easier to drive for a longer period of time because it’s quieter. And I find the articulation and the quickness of the steering makes it easier to operate in tight areas. The joysticks make it an easy, quick operation and the visibility is good because you can see obstacles more clearly.” “The great ergonomics mean the operators like Vince love sitting in the seats,” enthuses Stephen. “It’s fantastic for fatigue management and they can do more hours and a bit more work. “Some other improvements in the new vehicle are that the turning circle is significantly better, the service entry and getting around the machine is better and the cab doesn’t get as hot as before. That’s because they’ve relocated the hydraulics from under the cab and that’s transformed the heat and noise away from underneath the operator, which makes it a lot easier for the operator to sit in the cab all day, which is very good. All in all the comfort in the cab is 100% better. “Our relationship with WesTrac has gone exceptionally well over the years. Caterpillar and WesTrac have worked well with us and our operators. Our company relies a lot on graders for what we do. With the AccuGrade™ machine guidance system, the M Series is user friendly and really sophisticated to work with. The accuracy of the work is excellent.” Note: Caterpillar makes no warranties, guarantees, or representations as to the accuracy of information or timeliness of any information contained within these articles, and assumes no liability or responsibility for any errors, omissions or whatsoever in the content. Greg Walters – Greg’s Grader Hire, SA Jeff Schwarz co-owns Schwarz Excavations – a family business located in Gracemere, just outside Rockhampton. They currently run over 30 Cat® machines. Greg Walters and Greg’s Grader Hire in South Australia have had a relationship with Caterpillar for 25 years. “We’ve got two Cat graders at the moment, the 12H and the newer 160M. They are both major workhorses. The 160M has already done over 1000 hours in four months without a single problem. That’s just unbelievable! “The biggest cost to me as a business owner is downtime. If I can’t keep my operators and machines working, I lose money. With Cat machines, I don’t have to worry because if I do need a repair or a part, Hastings Deering service is just second to none. “When we first got the 160M, my operator Andrew was a bit sceptical. He was a bit thrown by the joysticks and the changes to the cabin.” “That’s true,” adds Andrew, a grader driver of seven years. “I loved the H Series and I was a bit reluctant to change to the M Series.” “Now we can’t get you out of it,” laughs Jeff. “Yeah,” smiles Andrew. “It’s a lot more comfortable. Not having to turn a wheel makes a huge difference. I get home after a 12 hour day in the cab feeling great. There’s way less fatigue. It’s a pleasure to drive.” “And that’s one of the big plusses for me as a business owner,” adds Jeff. ”If my operators are happy, safe and more comfortable, they’re going to be more productive at the end of the day. “We’ve also got two AccuGrade™ systems, and Hastings Deering’s support in helping us use them effectively has been brilliant.” “Before I bought the M Series, I had a Cat® 12G for 20 years and I reckon I got about 45,000 hours out of the old girl. It really did me well. About three years ago I decided to transition up to the M Series. “The joysticks were an interesting concept and it took me about a week of just going nice and slow, concentrating and getting used to the joystick principle. “With the joysticks, the physical effort is very low so all my concentration is going into the job – it’s a really comfortable operator station. “I feel like the overall productivity is greatly improved because I’m more comfortable. I can communicate with people onsite because it’s quieter due to the hydraulic pump being moved behind the engine. Safety is enhanced with the reversing camera. It actually makes me feel like working. “When you’re an hourly hire subcontractor like me, you really depend on the turnover of your machine. It has to be reliable. So Caterpillar really was the only choice that I considered. I’ve had such good field support, sales assistance, and at the end of the day, no matter how old or new the machine is, parts can be transferred to me within 24 hours. “Even when I was out of warranty and had some questions, they came out and had a look for no charge which is really good. “I’ve had the M Series now for three years and have done over 7,000 hours. If I was to be taken out of one of these, I would pack it up!”
  32. 32. 1000 M SERIES. THE STORY CONTINUES. Since the introduction of M Series, Caterpillar has been introducing a raft of class leading innovations. Some of these have been highly visible, such as the introduction of detentless joystick steering, but equally significant has been the collective impact of the many incremental changes that have been introduced along the way. Innovations such as the introduction of electronically adjustable arm rest control pods. These cleverly placed pods increase operator comfort and control and are easily adjusted via independent switches making sure your operators work as effectively as their machine. We’ve also introduced a foot support option so operators can enjoy enhanced stability during slope work. However increased comfort hasn’t come at the expense of performance. A new heavy duty ripper scarifier combination with more reach and greater digging and styling, has been introduced to penetrate tough material fast and rip thoroughly for easier movement with the mouldboard. M SERIES NSW/ACT WesTrac 1300 881 064 WA WesTrac 1300 881 064 VIC William Adams 03 9566 0666 Blade linkage arms have been reshaped for much better visibility and a new implement feature has been introduced so grading can be conducted at three levels of selectable blade lift sensitivity. Articulation and front axle steering cylinder guards are available as an attachment for increased protection to important areas where poor underfoot conditions exist. Every Cat® M Series that leaves our factory now comes complete with all you need to integrate the Cat AccuGrade™ automatic machine control technology – quicker, easier and more economically. And as part of our ongoing commitment to safety, we’ve also introduced new service brake control – software which assists operators to reduce engine stall by neutralising the transmission in certain conditions. We remain focused on continuing to deliver technology innovations that keep operators more comfortable, worksites more productive and businesses more profitable. Importantly, we look forward to sharing these innovations with you. M SERIES TAS QLD/NT SA To find out more about M Series Motor Graders, contact your local Cat dealer or visit www.australia.cat.com/mseries William Adams 03 6326 6366 Hastings Deering 131 228 Cavpower 08 8343 1600 © 2012 Caterpillar. CAT, CATERPILLAR, their respective logos, “Caterpillar Yellow,” the “Power Edge” trade dress as well as corporate and product identity used herein, are trademarks of Caterpillar and may not be used without permission.
  33. 33. Intelligent transport SYSTEMS ITS for M80 Ring Road An Intelligent Transport System is being progressively installed on Melbourne’s M80 Ring Road under a $62.5 million contract to equip it with technology that will help prevent congestion and give motorists the information they need to better plan journeys. Visionstream Australia will install an electronic freeway management system along what is one of Melbourne’s busiest roads, providing VicRoads the tools to better manage traffic flows as well as respond quickly to accidents and breakdowns. Once fully in place along 38 kilometres of road from Laverton North to Greensborough, the system will use sensors built into the road surface to monitor the flow of traffic and prevent congestion by automatically reducing the number of vehicles entering the freeway via the on-ramps and varying the speed limits along it. In addition, strategically placed electronic message boards will provide motorists with real time information on the traffic conditions which lie ahead along the M80 and also on key connecting roads. Installation of the electronic freeway management system is part of the $2.25 billion M80 Ring Road Upgrade being jointly funded by the Federal ($900m) and Victorian ($300m) Governments, with the remainder to be sought in future budgets. The project will take five years to complete. “It’s all about getting the most out of the infrastructure we already have, which over time is a far smarter and cheaper option than simply building more and bigger roads,” said Anthony Albanese, Federal Infrastructure and Transport Minister. “As well as being good for taxpayers, this technology will deliver faster, safer and less frustrating driving conditions for the 142,000 motorists and truck drivers who use this vital part of Melbourne’s road network every day. “Indeed if applied nationwide, electronic freeway management systems have the potential to greatly reduce congestion and save Australian families and businesses more than $500 million a year,” Mr Albanese said. “That’s why in last year’s Budget we set aside funds to assist the states retrofit their existing motorways with the technology.” ROADS APRIL/MAY 2012 31

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