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Gen Y Strategies To Fuel Growth
 

Gen Y Strategies To Fuel Growth

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Co-presented with Kris Wickline at CUNA Mutual's 2008 Discovery Conference, this presentation provides an overview and business case for why credit unions NEED to focus on Gen Y as part of their ...

Co-presented with Kris Wickline at CUNA Mutual's 2008 Discovery Conference, this presentation provides an overview and business case for why credit unions NEED to focus on Gen Y as part of their overall business strategy.

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  • 2008 CUNA Mutual Group Discovery Conference 11/19/09 Discovery Conference Theme Slide
  • 2008 CUNA Mutual Group Discovery Conference 11/19/09
  • 2008 CUNA Mutual Group Discovery Conference 11/19/09
  • 2008 CUNA Mutual Group Discovery Conference 11/19/09
  • 2008 CUNA Mutual Group Discovery Conference 11/19/09
  • 2008 CUNA Mutual Group Discovery Conference 11/19/09
  • 2008 CUNA Mutual Group Discovery Conference 11/19/09
  • 2008 CUNA Mutual Group Discovery Conference 11/19/09 Start NOW! Build your capabilities…….
  • 2008 CUNA Mutual Group Discovery Conference 11/19/09 So what are the key characteristics of Generation Y that will force you to change the way you do business? This generation, just like their parents the boomers have the size and also the unprecedented technological evolution and world change to significantly impact American society. At 76 million people, they are projected to have the ability to significantly impact the big boomer brands by snubbing them or starting business that do business they way they want to. They are early technology adopters – and influence the rest of society and their parents. Parents frequently follow their children into technology. Some of the most notable examples include iPods and how adults have begun adopting social networking tools like MySpace and Facebook in a bid to become their kid’s "friend." The most successful social networking site for adults is Linkedin – a different twist than facebook, but a social/business network, nonetheless. Another interesting fact -- Parental text messaging is outstripping the growth rate among younger generations. In the past two years, use of the technology by those ages 45 to 54 increased 130 percent, according to M:Metrics, a market-research firm. Why – to keep in touch with their kids. One last stat – while Gen Y’s use of home banking will increase by 136% over the next 5 years as they begin the foundation of their financial lives, boomer adoption of online banking will grow at a very respectable growth rate of 43% over the same period. So while Gen Y may adopt these technologies early expect the older generations – particularly their parents to adopt as well. From a financial perspective, a 2004 Study, Forrester identified that 1 in 3 consumers who moved, got married or changed jobs in the previous year – in other words life events that trigger financial decisions – were between the ages of 18 and 34. These life events include going to or graduating from college, getting a first job, moving or getting married. They have grown up in an era where debt is a way of life. They understand that a significant amount of debt will be involved with college – and that’s before they even think about their first home. At the same time, they are concerned about having enough money to retire. While its generally only the older crowd within the segment that has investable assets to worry about, this generation understands there won’t be the safety net their parents and older generations have. Lastly, the thing that gets most FI’s worried about serving this market is the fact that they are demanding. Since they have grown up with technology, they are connected 24x7 using multiple devices. They expect immediate action – both in terms of service and simple things like how quickly your web page loads. They love the customization that web tool afford so that they can express themselves – witness things like iGoogle, personal websites, social networking sites, user generated video. All tools that allow them to express themselves and their uniqueness. The bottom line on Gen Y as we’ve talked about so far is, They’ve got size, they’ve got financial needs, they have the ability to change our society significantly and they have the makings of being a great customer base. So serving them isn’t about having a “Young Adult Strategy” or finding a new customer niche – its about your future as a viable and successful credit union. Lets talk a little bit about how they think and then we’ll get into specific strategies and examples on how to serve them.
  • 2008 CUNA Mutual Group Discovery Conference 11/19/09
  • 2008 CUNA Mutual Group Discovery Conference 11/19/09 Most arguments I’ve heard against youth programs over the years are that Young Adults don’t buy. But the research shows that this is not true. For example, this study showed the products that were going to be bought. The bottom line is that GEN Y has the same desires as other generations. Its they way they approach these needs and their engagements that’s different. Its not so much what they use but how they use it and access it.
  • 2008 CUNA Mutual Group Discovery Conference 11/19/09 Not only that, lets take a look at what type of customer they are: GEN Y are significantly more likely than previous generations buy at one place Look to their banking institution for products And even buy non-banking products there. This shows both interest and loyalty. The question becomes whether you want to spend the money to acquire them now, or spend money trying to woe them away from Bank of America later. I can tell you which will cost less. Whats worse – perhaps you risk getting them at all!
  • Make a great customer.
  • 2008 CUNA Mutual Group Discovery Conference 11/19/09 What does advocate mean to Gen Y – education, tools… …… customers like doing business with you. This means that they want to have more interactions with you because they see you as useful, making their lives easier, and enjoyable. In fact, CU’s were not only 20% higher than banks in term of their overall rankings, they were ranked in the top 10 of all companies surveyed. The other companies in the top ten were retailers. So, with the two powerful advantages of being trusted and enjoyable, Credit Unions have the opportunity to be a significant provider of financial solutions for Generation Y. But with a generation that is used to getting what they want or need, CUs must provide the right products AND services, and reach them. Transition: In order to do this, CU’s must essentially age or change or risk irrelevance.
  • 2008 CUNA Mutual Group Discovery Conference 11/19/09 Main Point: Credit Unions have the advantage of Trust!!!! Every year, Forrester Research surveys financial services customers asking them whether their financial provider does what’s best for them and not just what is best for the companies bottom line. In 2007, Credit Unions came in right after USAA, a financial services firm focused on serving the military, and independent advisors, who are often paid only a flat fee to remain objective in providing products and advice. This left Credit Unions at the top of the financial services firm with the banks, displayed in red, far below them. Forrester mentions that unlike banks who put profits and political in fighting ahead of customers, credit unions focus on helping their members first. And Forrester has determined that being trusted is actually the primary indicator that customers will purchase more in the future. Gen Y values honesty and simplicity. Remember, they’ve grown up with Enron, Worldcom and other corporate scandals. The internet bubble, and most recently sub-prime scandals and housing bubbles doing business with the right company is important. They are skeptical and looking for trusted places to do business. They will become even more interested in this trust as they have to start making critical financial decisions. Transition: Credit Unions have a second important advantage…. (Additional Notes: Four Principles of Advocacy: Simplicity-makes my easier Transparency-clear and fair rates, no surprises. 3. Benevolence-on my side and willing to help me. 4. Trustworthy-would do what is right regardless of regulation, honors promises, goes the extra step to protect me.)
  • 2008 CUNA Mutual Group Discovery Conference 11/19/09
  • 2008 CUNA Mutual Group Discovery Conference 11/19/09 So if you believe Gen Y is important and if you believe you have an advantage, they how exactly do you attract and retain them. Well, to do that, its crucial to take a different view – you need to understand how Generation Y THINKS and then apply that to the products and services you deliver. Today, we’ll look at 4 major themes – there are others – but we’ll focus on a few: Gen Y has always been told that they can be whatever they want. Raised on games where everyone wins and there are trophies for trying, these people have CEO on the brain. Also, they are continually connected, not being able to remember a time without internet service and computers. Their second language is texting. Further, instead of the stage at school, they use the internet to express themselves. Most will not only use it to view movies but to make one themselves. Their yearbook is Facebook and Myspace. They think by consensus and their friends are not limited to the block they live on…..or state….or country. At the same time their parents are never far away, hovering to provide assistance on a moments notice. And they love the support. (Next, the have grown up in a time where there has been rapid technology adoption. Many have not known life without computers – and have had them from early schools. They don’t remember life without remote controls, phones that aren’t portable – or mobile phones. They have incorporated these into their lives to make them easier, to communicate with their friends and yes – to have fun. Anyone who has a kid of this generation can tell you about the proficiency of texting, IM, or gaming. Technology pervades every aspect of their life. In the about 4 years (facebook was founded in Feb of 2004), social networking tools such as facebook have taken off from nothing to having more than 70 million active users, being the 5th most-trafficked website in the world (comScore) and Facebook is the 2nd most-trafficked social media site in the world (comScore) – behind MySpace. People spend an average of 25 minutes on the site daily (comScore). It’s the # 1 photo sharing website according to comscore (sorry Snapfish). There are over 20,000 applications for facebook – with 140 being added every day. Wow! How and why did this happen.? Because facebook is a tool that facilities group communicating. These kids grew up in an era of play dates, team sports, and group activities – facebook facilitates that need as they grow into young adulthood. Gen Y has been ‘validated’ their whole lives. Their teachers, their family, their friends have reinforced their sense of self and their decisions. So while they tech savvy and love to do research before major purchases, they also crave the validation that they have made the right decision. And lastly – their parents have been extremely involved with their lives. The tongue-in-cheek term ‘Helicopter parents’ sums this up. But unlike Generations before them – both the Xers and their Boomer parents – they didn’t feel this same strong bond with parents. Even into adult-hood they rely heavily on their parents.’ So how does this translated to strategy? We’ll look to specific strategies and examples that banks and credit unions have created to meet the needs of Gen Y. Now that we understand how they think, lets talk about how that translates to the products, services and delivery.)
  • 2008 CUNA Mutual Group Discovery Conference 11/19/09 Rotate at the beginning of the speech – these and others. Interesting before we start.
  • 2008 CUNA Mutual Group Discovery Conference 11/19/09
  • 2008 CUNA Mutual Group Discovery Conference 11/19/09 Looking for trusted sources….understand and help them attain their goals. The overall student lending environment has been…….. This is a long term play – not necessarily a short term play.
  • 2008 CUNA Mutual Group Discovery Conference 11/19/09 It is obviously for the student, give the functionality online, and speaks in their language. UW Credit Union in Madison, has an entirely separate site for student loans. They provide an easy online application process for student loans and heavily leverage the site to capture additional relationships. They speak in the generation’s language and media – leveraging online video to showcase branches or online services. And, of course, they allow the ability to open account online.
  • 2008 CUNA Mutual Group Discovery Conference 11/19/09 Check out site..USC, Coastal Carolina
  • 2008 CUNA Mutual Group Discovery Conference 11/19/09 Trusted Advisor/Advocate – get them to come to you vs. going to the dealer…. Average age of first time car buyer is 19.5 (Filene – First Time Used Car Y’ers. )Parents have significant influence on the decision process for those who aren’t living independently. Even for those who are, living independently, one third said their parents held a lot of influence over the purchase. Discuss role of web as information tool for shopping. Discuss role of indirect lending – can we draw a tie to the indirect lending pilot? Get em in the door anyway you can then focus on deepening the relationship. Advocacy role of CU – Convenicience vs. Low cost of dealer. Already have the in……. Even if you can’t help them immediately, find a way you can help them in the future – instead of no.
  • 2008 CUNA Mutual Group Discovery Conference 11/19/09 Describe how the product offered by Shreveport shows a real need but also gets to the heart of young adult need to build credit profile Any graphics from the CU’s site showing the product.
  • 2008 CUNA Mutual Group Discovery Conference 11/19/09 JOSH: Thought it would be nice to try to the needs noted in the Forrester study and also hit on the older ages in the segment (vs. auto lending and student lending which is the younger end of the segment). Also, thinking that this might tie nicely to your money management need. Can we also hit on the fact that CUs can play a real role in helping folks here – just like in student lending where banks are running due to the credit crunch. Is this msg playing w/CUs right now? Lastly, do you have any unique examples of how CUS might meet the needs of Gen Y for homebuying – if you don’t have any examples, we may want to take this out as this whole topic is really out of my current knowledge as far as Gen Y goes. Home Buying Facts for Gen Y: Average age of first time home buyer is 26! They tend to be better educated &76% have training or degress post high school. HH income averaged $58,000. (Filene, First Time Home Yer’s). Parental influence irrelevant. Relationships with realtor important. Facilitate information gathering. Provide good content on your home financing options on the web.
  • 2008 CUNA Mutual Group Discovery Conference 11/19/09 Example of a unique product and service = Pentagon Federal CU Foundation’s Dream Makers Match savings for closing costs and down payment up to 5K Program for first-time home buyers serving in the military with certain income restrictions Member reps help individual decide how much to save based on pending mortgage application Must attend a home buying seminar Must own your new home for 5 years from the time of purchase. If house sold before 5 years, grant must be repaid, unless “permanent change of station” orders Mortgages must be 30-year fixed-rate, maximum of 97% financed. 3% down payment required.
  • 2008 CUNA Mutual Group Discovery Conference 11/19/09 Re: Money management – more description of needs and examples. Because they spend over 13 hours on the web each week, you want to make sure that they can have their entire experience online. I mentioned the fact that Gen Y is constantly connected. They spend over 13 hours a week online, 20 minutes texting, and already consider email an “old” technology. They will be the largest group on online customers within the next 5 years, applying for most products online. They want online personal financial management and seamless functionality.
  • 2008 CUNA Mutual Group Discovery Conference 11/19/09 Technology is crucial to serving Gen Y. Use Technology to make transacting simple. Use transacting as a way to engage them. Help them w/their basic needs – Money Tracker is a good example of this. Make Technology your business plan. Amplify Federal Credit Union is a best in class example. Is there anyone in the room by chance from Amplify. According to them, the 18-30 market is “where they live” From their logo -- a wifi symbol and tagline of ‘Bank Less. Live More”. They are living it. By the way, Gen Y is also know as Gen Y-Fi Here is a credit union on the cutting edge with mobile banking, deposit at home, the award winning money tracker. Note about the fact that these are STICKY services.
  • 2008 CUNA Mutual Group Discovery Conference 11/19/09 Service and delivery channel ex. This is an app that the CU built for FB. Need to know FOM –this is a silicon valley CU.
  • 2008 CUNA Mutual Group Discovery Conference 11/19/09 This may work for you …more broad; targeted to provide service for existing but also get NEW members.. Facebook is a tool that can be leveraged in a variety of always. In this slide, you’ll see ‘my money’ by Fiserve. My Money is a facebook app which allows user to do basic functions or enter their online banking from their facebook page. The app serves as a convenience tool for the member – moving toward making facebook a ‘portal’. The second possible benefit is that your friends can view your relationship and you can stimulate an invitation to join – so it may have a viral quality to it. The functionality is brand new with only 40 or so credit unions and fewer daily users – so the verdict is out on its success. But the key is to be thinking about how to provide a benefit to your Gen Y consumer through social media.
  • 2008 CUNA Mutual Group Discovery Conference 11/19/09 Now before we talk about where to reach them, we need to make sure that you are already doing whatever you can to develop your customers within the context of how they interact with you. If you aren’t communicating with young adults in your current marketing mix – specifically within your on-line banking/web services – start there before you start looking to new media. Where do you find them…..they’re not watching TV….share some stats about traditional media to compare/contrast where they are. There are a huge number of new ways to communicate with this generation. This data from Forrester shows Gen Y’s online dependence – particularly in ‘new media’ such as ‘social media’, video sharing and blogs – 42% use social networking, 40% watch peer generated content on a video sharing site. The nice thing about some of the new media is that the investments aren’t huge so it experimentation can be justified from a budget point of view. A few examples of how credit unions and others have experimented with these include
  • 2008 CUNA Mutual Group Discovery Conference 11/19/09
  • 2008 CUNA Mutual Group Discovery Conference 11/19/09
  • 2008 CUNA Mutual Group Discovery Conference 11/19/09 Facebook and other social media sites serve an important function beyond the apparent communication benefits. They allow individuals to EXPRESS THEMSELVES. Remember – this generation loves to express their individuality. Financial products that have evolved into feeding this need are – examples such as these in the credit card space. Captial One’s Card Lab offers not only graphic customization but actual card feature customization. Wescom and America First offer programs where graphics can be customized. One can hypothesize that these also contribute somewhat to stickiness – who would want to destroy the card with ones favorite picture of themselves 
  • 2008 CUNA Mutual Group Discovery Conference 11/19/09
  • 2008 CUNA Mutual Group Discovery Conference 11/19/09 Older gens use consumer reports – basic need for info the same, its just how we go about it.
  • 2008 CUNA Mutual Group Discovery Conference 11/19/09
  • 2008 CUNA Mutual Group Discovery Conference 11/19/09
  • 2008 CUNA Mutual Group Discovery Conference 11/19/09 Lastly – lets not forget about some key principles from consumer behavior 101 – in product decisions there are decision makers and influencers. According to a recent study by PEW, the younger segment of the cohort maintains close contact w/their parents -- roughly 8 in 10 of younger members say they talked to their parents in the last day. One need not look further than the College Parent Magazine which coaches boomers on how to effectively parent, understand and communicate with their college student. Because GEN Y’ers have close relationships with their parents – their parents can function as both the influencer and the decision maker – depending on the product and the age of the consumer. Don’t forget to leverage your marketing and communication efforts with parents when appropriate.
  • 2008 CUNA Mutual Group Discovery Conference 11/19/09
  • 2008 CUNA Mutual Group Discovery Conference 11/19/09
  • 2008 CUNA Mutual Group Discovery Conference 11/19/09
  • 2008 CUNA Mutual Group Discovery Conference 11/19/09
  • 2008 CUNA Mutual Group Discovery Conference 11/19/09 I didn’t’ address board members and staff, etc. because we didn’t’ specifically address that in the .ppt. Shall we speak to it – since this is a summary slide?
  • 2008 CUNA Mutual Group Discovery Conference 11/19/09
  • 2008 CUNA Mutual Group Discovery Conference 11/19/09
  • 2008 CUNA Mutual Group Discovery Conference 11/19/09

Gen Y Strategies To Fuel Growth Gen Y Strategies To Fuel Growth Presentation Transcript

  • © CUNA Mutual Group 2007. Reproduction, adaptation or distribution without permission of CUNA Mutual is prohibited. common vision • uncommon experience • think discovery
  • The Young Adult Market Strategies to Fuel Growth Who Are These People?
  • Our Assertion
    • Gen Y is a good customer base to have right now and you can mold them into a great future customer base.
    • Successfully serving Gen Y is critical to the future of your credit union and the Movement.
    • It isn’t about creating a “Young Adult Strategy”, It’s about evolving your business !
  • The Young Adult Market Strategies to Fuel Growth Who is Gen Y and “Y” You Should Care Financial Needs and The CU Advantage How They Think, Behave and CUs Who Get Them! Discoveries and Resources
  • Who is Gen Y?
    • Also called Millennials, Generation Next, Generation Net.
    • Born between 1977 and 1995 (13-31 years old).
    • Our discussion will focus on 18-30 (49M).
    Generation Birth Years Population Great 1925-1945 41 million Boomers 1946-1964 77 million X 1965-1976 46 million Y 1977-1995 76 million
  • Why Focus on Gen Y? Average member is 47 years old Lower penetration in Gen Y than any other age group CUNA National Member Survey 2006-2007 Credit Union Penetration U.S. Adults – Membership by Age 23% 33% 41% 41% 28% 0% 5% 10% 15% 20% 25% 30% 35% 40% 45% 18-34 35-44 45-54 55-64 65+
  • Macro Trend – Gen Y Peak borrowing years Membership by age 0% 10% 20% 30% 40% 50% 60% 70% 80% 90% 100%
  • Total Annual Income (Trillions) Source: Javelin Strategy and Research
  • Worth Attracting – They Are The Future!
    • 1 . Influential
      • Technologic pioneers
      • Enabling older generations to adopt technology.
      • Socially connected valuing group opinions.
    Young Adults are…
    • 2. Active
      • 1 of 3 had a life event needing a financial product.
      • Comfortable with borrowing as a way of life.
      • 18-24 year olds have 122 billion in spending power.
    • 3. Efficient
      • Use E-Channel and automated systems.
      • Interact quickly-needing less follow-up.
      • Become E-vangelists by rating & recommending
  • The Young Adult Market Strategies to Fuel Growth Who is Gen Y and “Y” You Should Care Financial Needs and The CU Advantage How They Think, Behave and CUs Who Get Them! Discoveries and Resources
  • Buying Products You Have In need of starter products now
  • Willing to Buy From You “ I will buy many products from one place." “ I will check my current bank first”. “ I would by non-banking products from them.” Source: Forrester’s Consumer Technographics Study 2003 Acquire now vs. pay to switch them later
  • Serve Their Basic Needs
    • Engage through education and service:
      • Building Credit.
      • Debt Management.
      • Money Management.
      • Asset Building.
  • Customer Experience 2007 How Customers Rank “Banking” Great experiences result in more customers interactions. The Credit Union Advantage
  • Customer Advocacy 2007 How Customers Rate Financial Services Company Score USAA 88% Local Advisor 76% Credit Unions 66% Local Banks 48% Wachovia 40% U.S. Bank 36% WaMu 34% Bank of America 33% Wells Fargo 32% Citibank 24% Advocacy drives willingness to buy or borrow more. Credit Unions are Trusted
  • The Young Adult Market Strategies to Fuel Growth Who is Gen Y and “Y” You Should Care Financial Needs and The Credit Union Advantage How They Think, Behave and CUs Who Get Them! Discoveries and Resources
  • I connect to transact, communicate, and express. I seek opinions, buy, and leave opinions . I my “helicopter” parents. I expect BIG things! How “I” Think
    • My problem lies in reconciling my gross habits with my net income. 
    • ~Errol Flynn
    • I see a pair of shoes I adore, and it doesn't matter if they have them in my size. I buy them anyway.
    • ~ Keira Knightley
  • Fund Their Future
    • Student Lending
      • Educate and Advise students and their parents .
        • Teach debt management, responsible borrowing and how to build good credit.
      • Provide federal and private lending products.
      • Leverage the web to establish a primary banking relationship.
      • Include student loans as part of a student banking bundle.
    • Research and apply.
    • Become a member.
    • Cross-sell.
    • Media students enjoy.
    UW Credit Union
    • Money 101
        • Address products and needs.
        • Combine with other events.
        • Schools love it.
        • Students value it.
        • Parents appreciate it.
    USC Credit Union
  •  
  • Fund Their Freedom
    • Auto Lending
      • Educate and advise young adults and their parents on all aspects of the car buying process.
        • Researching.
        • Shopping.
        • Financing.
        • Building Credit.
        • Debt Management.
      • “ On-Board” indirect borrowers.
      • Create product bundles to meet additional needs.
  • Shreveport Credit Union
    • Side-by-Side Auto Loan
      • Risk-based lending
        • Terms up to 72-month terms for first-time car buyers.
      • Signature Loan
        • Finance first 6 months of insurance as part of loan.
      • Save for next round of insurance payments
      • Separate loans improve overall credit profile
        • Bundle sold as a FICO booster.
  • Fund The American Dream
    • Educate and advise young adult first time home buyers on all aspects of home buying process.
      • Build trust and sense of advocacy.
      • Debt Management.
      • Money Management.
    • Create product features that speak to their unique needs.
  • Wright-Patt Credit Union
  • Pentagon FCU Foundation
    • Make on-line transacting quick and easy!
    • Communicate to them simply and where “they” are at.
    Relevant Services, Messages and Media
  • Amplify Federal Credit Union
  • KeyPoint CU
  • Link to my banking
  • Gen Y Dominates New Media Source: Forrester’s North American Technographics® Benchmark Survey, Q1 2007
      • Young & Free campaign
      • Common Wealth Credit Union (Canada)
      • http://www.youngfreealberta.com/
    Young & Free Alberta
    • Gen Y Extreme Checking Video Contest
      • Fairfax Federal Credit Union (Virginia)
      • http://www.fairfaxcu.org/ASP/home.asp
    Fairfax FCU
  • Express Myself!
  • Influenced and Influence Source: Forrester’s North American Technographics® Benchmark Survey, Q1 2007
  • Provide User Recommendations A “page” from internet retailers Group opinion matters Gen Y Seek Recommendations Websites
  • Verity CU
  • Verity CU
  • Engage Parents Parent recommendations matter
  • Financial Center Credit Union Putting it All Together to Serve Gen Y
    • FCCU Strategy
    • Staying in touch
    • Brand appeal
    • Community presence
  • Financial Center Credit Union CUNA’s Best Practices: A Youthful Approach to CU Growth
  • Financial Center Credit Union
    • Results :
      • # of savings accounts increased 23%
      • # of checking accounts increased 21%
      • # of auto loans increased 16%
      • 433 new accounts taking out 524 loans within three months
      • $1.2 million in new-vehicle loans and $1.5 million in used-vehicle loans
    • CUNA’s Best Practices: A Youthful Approach to CU Growth
  • The Young Adult Market Strategies to Fuel Growth Who is Gen Y and “Y” You Should Care Financial Needs and The Credit Union Advantage How They Think, Behave and CUs Who Get Them! Discoveries and Resources
  • Discoveries: The Keys to Gen Y
    • CU Advantage: Trust, Great Experiences, Advocacy!
    • Get relationships with starter products migrate into others.
    • Educate on financial concerns:
      • Building Credit.
      • Debt Management.
      • Money Management.
      • Asset Building.
    • Provide relevant service, media and messages.
    • Recommendations, including parents.
    It Isn’t About Creating a Young Adult Strategy, It’s About Evolving Your Business!
      • YES CU Community www.yescucommunity.com
    Resources….. 2008 YES Summit December 3-5, 2008  Tampa, FL MoneyMix: Launch Your Life
    • Filene Research Institute
      • Research
        • George Hofheimer
        • Chief Research Officer
        • [email_address]
        • http://filene.org/
      • 30 Under 30 initiative
        • Ben Rogers
        • Director of 30 Under 30 & Driver of CUTomorrow
        • [email_address]
        • http://www.cutomorrow.org
    Resources…..
  • Contact Information
    • Kris Wickline
    • Consumer Program Manager, 18-30 Market
    • CUNA Mutual Group
    • 608-232-6035
    • [email_address]
  • Contact Information
    • Joshua Jones, CUDE
    • Manager of Young Adult Programs
    • Credit Union National Association
    • 608-231-4262
    • [email_address]