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A snapshot of MOOCs in Higher Education
A snapshot of MOOCs in Higher Education
A snapshot of MOOCs in Higher Education
A snapshot of MOOCs in Higher Education
A snapshot of MOOCs in Higher Education
A snapshot of MOOCs in Higher Education
A snapshot of MOOCs in Higher Education
A snapshot of MOOCs in Higher Education
A snapshot of MOOCs in Higher Education
A snapshot of MOOCs in Higher Education
A snapshot of MOOCs in Higher Education
A snapshot of MOOCs in Higher Education
A snapshot of MOOCs in Higher Education
A snapshot of MOOCs in Higher Education
A snapshot of MOOCs in Higher Education
A snapshot of MOOCs in Higher Education
A snapshot of MOOCs in Higher Education
A snapshot of MOOCs in Higher Education
A snapshot of MOOCs in Higher Education
A snapshot of MOOCs in Higher Education
A snapshot of MOOCs in Higher Education
A snapshot of MOOCs in Higher Education
A snapshot of MOOCs in Higher Education
A snapshot of MOOCs in Higher Education
A snapshot of MOOCs in Higher Education
A snapshot of MOOCs in Higher Education
A snapshot of MOOCs in Higher Education
A snapshot of MOOCs in Higher Education
A snapshot of MOOCs in Higher Education
A snapshot of MOOCs in Higher Education
A snapshot of MOOCs in Higher Education
A snapshot of MOOCs in Higher Education
A snapshot of MOOCs in Higher Education
A snapshot of MOOCs in Higher Education
A snapshot of MOOCs in Higher Education
A snapshot of MOOCs in Higher Education
A snapshot of MOOCs in Higher Education
A snapshot of MOOCs in Higher Education
A snapshot of MOOCs in Higher Education
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A snapshot of MOOCs in Higher Education

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Massive Open Online Courses (MOOCs) have been the hottest topic in Higher Education this year. Educating tens of thousands of students in one online course subtends some exciting opportunities but …

Massive Open Online Courses (MOOCs) have been the hottest topic in Higher Education this year. Educating tens of thousands of students in one online course subtends some exciting opportunities but also a raft of pedagogical, logistical, and systemic challenges. This presentation summarises the key issues at stake and outlines a direction forward for Massive Open Online Courses in Higher Education.

Kenney, J.L. & Bower, M. (2012). Massive Open Online Courses (MOOCs): A snapshot. Presented at Expanding Horizons, L&T Week, Macquarie University, Sydney, Australia, 18 September.

Audio available from: http://tinyurl.com/moocs-snapshot

Published in: Education, Technology

Transcript

  • 1. Kenney, J.L. & Bower, M. (2012). Massive Open Online Courses (MOOCs): A snapshot. Presented at ExpandingHorizons, L&T Week, Macquarie University, Sydney, Australia, 18 September. Massive Open Online Courses (MOOCs): A snapshot  Jacqueline
Kenney
&
Ma/
Bower
 Department of Education, Macquarie University Tue 18 Sep, 2012
  • 2. Session
outline
 Introducing MOOCs      Characterising MOOCs     Extreme Openness & Disruptive Pedagogy      Criticism, Consequences & Questions      Alternatives and Futures     
  • 3. (Source: Lewin, 2012, in Siemens, 2012)
  • 4. ‘I
think
this
could
be
big
the
way
Google
was’
 (L. John Doerr, Venture Capitalist, Kleiner Perkins Caulfield & Byers   & Coursera Board member)  Coursera Founders: Daphne Koller & Andrew Ng, Stanford University
 (Source:Berger (image); Young, 2012, in Siemens, 2012)
  • 5. (Source: Weissmann, 2012, in Siemens, 2012)
  • 6. A
tec[h]tonic
shiC?
•  Analogies?
 •  Public
libraries
 •  iTunes
 •  Green
slips
 •  Democracy
in
Middle
East
 •  RockNroll
in
the
60s
•  Divided
opinions
 •  SkepPcs
 Gartner
 Hype
 •  CriPcs
 Cycle
 •  Proponents
 (Source: Gartner, 2008)
  • 7. Introducing
MOOCs
 A
Misnomer?
•  Massive
open
online
courses:

 •  MOOC
as
misnomer
(Wiley, 2012):

 –  provide
no
constraints
on
class
size;

 –  Many
are
massive
but
not
open;
 –  run
over
a
defined
Pme
period;
and,
 –  Many
are
open
but
not
massive;
and,
 –  Many
try
not
to
be
courses.

 –  are
open
to
all.

 •  ‘Almost
every
so‐called
MOOC
•  Early
instanPaPon
pa/ern:
‘let’s
put
on
a
 violates
at
least
one
le/er
in
the
 course
here,
right
now’;

 acronym’.
•  Recent
offerings:
 –  make
exisPng
university
teaching
 •  Not
all
MOOCs
(Cormier & Siemens, 2010):
 –  Mirror
discussion
at
a
conference,
 materials
freely
available
online;
 in
a
research
lab,
or
in
a
workshop;
 –  use
computer
marked
assessment;
and,
 –  Bring
a
wide
variety
of
perspecPves
 –  may
give
parPcipants
cerPficates
of
 on
a
given
topic;
 complePon.
 –  Members
resemble
‘people
in
a
 corner
having
an
in‐depth
 discussion
that
they
can
choose
to
 (Source: Open University, 2012, p. 19) enter’;
and,
 –  Have
enough
course
structure
for
 interested
learners
to
‘build
 sufficient
language
and
experPse
to
 parPcipate
peripherally
or
directly’

  • 8. MOOC

 • Berklee College of Music, Brown Uni., Columbia Uni., Emory Uni., Hebrew Uni.of Jerusalem, Hong Kong Uni. of Science and Technology, Mount Sinai School of Medicine, Ohio State Timeline
 Uni., Uni.of British Columbia, Uni.of California at Irvine, University of Florida, Uni.of London, Uni.of Maryland at College Park, Uni.of Melbourne, Uni.of Pittsburgh, Vanderbilt Uni., Wesleyan Uni. 2008
 2009
 2010
 2011
 2012
 • CCK (Connectivism, • Change MOOC & Connective • Digital Storytelling, Knowledge) George • Numerous smaller • Intro to Openness Jim Groom & Martha Siemens, Stephen MOOCs in Education, David Burtis, University of Downes, Athabasca Mary Washington Wiley, OE US Virtual Worlds, University & National Games & Ed Tour • Personal Learning • Artificial Intelligence, P2PU Research Council Sebastian Thrun & Environments (Canada) (25 fee- Peter Norvig, • Virtual Schooling, Networks & paying students + Stanford University Michael Barbour, Knowledge, Dave >2,300 MOOCers* (>160,000 starters) Wayne State Uni Cormier, George *Dave Cormier and Bryan Alexander  Siemens & Stephen • Udacity formed • MobiMOOC coined ‘MOOCs’ during CCK ac<vi<es
 Downes (Thrun) Ignatia Webs • Coursera launched • Georgia Tech, Duke Uni., Open but not always Massive OOCs: Stanford University Uni.of Washington, Rice • Social Media & Open Ed, Alec Courous, University of Regina (2008); Open (Koller & Ng) Uni., Caltech, Uni.of Education Intro , David Wiley, Utah State University (2007); Codecademy/ • edX (MIT (MITx) Edinburgh, Uni.of P2PU (Sims & Bubinski) (2011); Khan Academy – over 189 million lessons; Harvard & Berkeley) Toronto, EPFL Lausanne Academic Earth; Skillshare >5,000 teachers (2011); World Education (Switz.), Johns Hopkins University (2012); Saylor Foundation; Course Hero; Faculty project Uni., UCSF, Uni.of Illinois Urbana-Champaign,(Sources: Ruminate, 2010; OU, 2012; Webs, 2012; Open Education, 2012; Virtual Schooling, Nextweb, 2012; Uni.of Virginia P2PU, 2012; Bavatuesdays, 2012; Marginson, 2012; Coecademy, 2012; Coursera, 2012; Academicearth, 2012)
  • 9. MOOCdom
A
MOOC
Directory
 Keeping
up
with
MOOCs:
•  All
MOOC
providers
(as
registered):
 •  Register
with
mooc.ca
newsle/er:
 h/p://www.mooc.ca/courses.htm
 h/p://www.mooc.ca/cgi‐bin/•  Class
central:
 login.cgi?refer=&acPon=Register
 h/p://www.class‐central.com/

Some
resources
on
MOOCS:
 Early
and
original
MOOCs:
•  MOOCs
starPng
point
(to
Aug
2012):
 •  CCKChange:

 h/p://www.worldofwebcast.com/ h/p://change.mooc.ca
 post/massive‐list‐of‐mooc‐resources‐ •  DS106
(Digital
Storytelling):
 lit‐and‐literaP

 h/p://ds106.us/about/
•  OOCs
starPng
point:
 •  Social
Media
&
Open
EducaPon:
 h/p://openeducaPon.us/
 h/p://eci831.ca/about/
 ParDcipate
in
a
MOOC
on
Higher
EducaDon
Futures
(8
Oct
to
16
Nov
2012):
•  InvitaPon,
overview
&
partners:
h/p://www.youtube.com/watch?v=pEXnVTD0B10
•  Register:
h/p://www.edfutures.net/index.php?Ptle=Special:UserLogin/signup

  • 10. (Source: Change MOOC, 2012)Stephen
Downes
(Na<onal Research Council, Canada),
Dave
Cormier
(University of Prince Edward Island),
and
George
Siemens

(Athabasca University).
Weve
collaborated
on
numerous
online

courses
before
and
have
conPnued
to
refine
our
pedagogical
methods
and
our
technical
infrastructure.
The
format
this
year
is
different
from
what
weve
done
in
the
past:
weve
invited
a
group
of
fascinaPng
thinkers
to
share
their
experPse
with
us
‐
one
per
week.

 Change
MOOC
 Sep
2011
to
May
2012

  • 11. (Source: DS106, 2102)DS106
Digital
Storytelling
MOOC
 Ongoing
since
December
2010

  • 12. (Source: P2PU, 2012) Virtual
Worlds,
Games
&
EducaDon
Tour
MOOC
March
to
April
2012
and
spinoffs
to
ARG
Academy
(May),
Machinima
OOC
(June‐July)

  • 13. Jesse Stommel et alMarylhurst
University
&
Georgia
Tech
(Images: Kevin Dooley; Richard Elzeygregw66; Nomadic Lass; JD Hancock; cjdc) MOOC
MOOC
 August
2012
for
one
week
 (Source: Hybrid Pedagogy, 2012)
  • 14. A
MOOC
task
to
define
MOOCs
…
Q:
 (Source: Hybrid Pedagogy MOOC MOOC, 2012)A:
 Massive: A typical classroom can hold 30 students or even more. An auditorium around 300. A massive class can go exponentially beyond these numbers: thousands, hundred-thousands, or even millions, a group size beyond Dunbar‘s number for a ‘tribe’ (500-2500 individuals). Open: Available for free and to anyone willing and able to participate. Not bound by geographyor time zones. Uses open tools. Uses open educational resources and creative commons licensed assets. Generates open contentthat can, in turn, be reused freely. Online: Use of the Internet, where individual people from all over the world can participate in the event. Includes access via mobile devices. Course: A sequence of lessons imparting knowledge via an instructor, who guides the process and established guidelines for participation, earning credit, and passing. Conversely, Davidson uses the ‘C’ to stand for “courseware,” and sees the MOOC as the platform to run the learning on, not the act of learning itself. >500
people
collaborated
on
a
1,000
word
essay
to
define
MOOCs
 MOOC
MOOC
on
googledocs
(available
at:
h/p://www.hybridpedagogy.com)

  • 15. 6.002x:
Circuits
and
Electronics
MOOC
(edX - MIT)
 September
to
December
2012

  • 16. Model
Thinking
MOOC
(Coursera
–
University
of
Michigan)
 September
to
November
2012

  • 17. There are many potential benefits of MOOCs, including flexible access, multiple learning pathways, social inclusion, intercultural collaboration, digital literacy development, and potentially immersion in a community of practice that may result in a lifelong learning network. (Source: Cormier, 2012) (Source: King, 2012)MOOCs not only have the potential toalter the relationship between learner and instructor, but also between academy and the wider community (EDUCAUSE, 2011). MOOCs allow for collaboration that is not immediately available in a traditional style classroom.
  • 18. David Wiley OPE NN ESS•  Open
systems
















 –  EducaPon
2.0
•  Open
classrooms
 –  Crowdsourcing
•  Open
knowledge
 –  Knowmads
•  Open
learning
 –  Everyone
Sources: Virtual School MOOC, 2012; Open Education, 2012; Morovec, 2008; UNESCO, 2012)
  • 19. Characterising
MOOCs
to
date
…
•  MOOCs
integrate:
 –  ConnecPvity
of
social
networking;
 –  FacilitaPon
of
an
acknowledged
expert
in
a
field
of
study;
and,
 –  CollecPon(s)
of
freely
accessible
online
resources.
•  MOOCs
build
on
parPcipants
who:
 –  Are
acPvely
engaged
in
learning;
 –  Register
in
large
numbers
(several
hundred
to
several
thousand
parPcipants);
 –  Self‐organise
parPcipaPon
according
to
learning
goals,
prior
knowledge
and
 skills,
and
common
interests;
and,
 –  Have
Internet
access.
•  MOOC
offerings:
 –  Start,
end
and
run
on
predefined
Pmelines
and
topics;
 –  Are
usually
without
fees;
 –  Have
no
prerequisites
beyond
Internet
access
and
interest
and,
 –  Do
not
predefine
expectaPons
for
parPcipaPon;
and
 –  Frequently
give
no
formal
accreditaPon
for
successful
course
complePon.
 (Source: McAuley, Steward, Siemens & Cormier, 2010, pp. 4-5)
  • 20. Pedagogic
typology
of
MOOCs
•  cMOOCs
(DS106,
CCK08‐9‐10‐12)
‐
connecPvist:
 –  Content
as
a
starPng
point:
learners
expected
to
create/extend
 –  Changed
relaPonship
between
teacher/learners
 –  Distributed,
chaoPc
and
emergent
 –  Learners
are
expected
to
create,
grow,
expand
domain
and
share
 personal
sense‐making
through
arPfact
creaPon
 cMOOCs focus on –  Distributed,
oCen
blog‐based,
learner
created
forums
and
spaces
 knowledge creation –  Instructor
graded
assessment
and
peer‐commented
tasks
 and generation whereas xMOOCs•  xMOOCs
(Coursera/Edx):
 focus on knowledge –  Formal
(tradiPonal)
course
structure
and
flow
 duplication (Siemens, 2012) –  TradiPonal
relaPonship
between
teacher/learner
 –  Learners
are
expected
to
duplicate/master
what
they
are
taught
 –  Centralised
discussion
forum
support
 –  Automated
assessment
and
peer‐reviewed
assessment
 (Sources: Siemens, 2012; Downes, 2012)
  • 21. Goal‐based
typology
of
MOOCs
 •  Network‐based MOOCs:
 Goal:
conversaPon,
 socially
constructed
 knowledge;
Pedagogy:
 connecPvist
style.
 •  Task‐based MOOCs:
Goal:
 skills,
topics
and
varied
 formats
with
distributed
 learning
and
community.
 Pedagogy:
instrucPvism
 and
construcPvism.

 •  Content‐based MOOCs:
 1.  Categories are not mutually exclusive  Goal:
acquisiPon
of
 ? 2.  Pedagogy is the difference (Siemens, 2012)  3.  Depth of analysis required (ie, family resemblances)  (Lukeš, 2012)  content
knowledge.
 Pedagogy:
instrucPvist.
 (Source: Lane, 2012)
  • 22. Type‐target‐intent
of
MOOC
futures
 (Source: Bonk, 2012) Poten<al that the 1.  AlternaPve
admissions
system
or
 list may have  11.  Goodwill
 significant overlap  hiring
system
 with non‐ 12.  Interdisciplinary
2.  Just‐in‐Time
skills
and
competencies
 educa<onal  large  13.  RecruiPng
(Cross,
2012)
 crowd online 3.  Theory‐
or
Trend‐Drive
 14.  MarkePng

(Cross,
2012)
 experiences 4.  Professional
development
 15.  Conference

(Cross,
2012)
5.  Loss
Leader
(dip
toe
in
water)
6.  Bait
and
switch
 16.  Learning
Room

(Cross,
2012)
 17.  Religious
Revival
 ?7.  Experimental

 18.  RotaPng
 The list may have 8.  Degree/Program
Qualifier
or
System
 nothing to do with  Bo/leneck
 19.  Repeatable
 the purpose and  20.  Re‐usable
MOOC
 func<on of MOOCs 9.  Personality
 as originally 10.  Name
Branding
 constructed  (Bonk, 2012)  The list responded to questions posed by the University [Indiana University] CIO and VP IT
  • 23. Visual
pracPce
 (Source: Forsythe, 2012)
  • 24. ConnecPvist
and
rhizomaPc
views
ConnecPvist
view
of
knowing
(Siemens, 2004; 2006):
•  Knowing
is
the
culminaPon
of
the
connecPons
between
people
•  Learning
and
connecPon:
professional,
personal
and
academic
•  But
…
it
is
also
connecPon
between
organised
and
disorganised
worlds
 ……
world
of
the
Web
RhizomaPc
view
of
knowledge
(Cormier, 2008; 2010; Open University, 2012):
•  A
rhizomaPc
plant
has
no
center
and
no
defined
boundary;
rather,
it
is
made
up
of
 a
number
of
semi‐independent
nodes,
each
of
which
is
capable
of
growing
and
 spreading
on
its
own,
bounded
only
by
the
limits
of
its
habitat
 •  No
one
place
where
knowledge
about
a
ma/er
begins
and
ends
 •  Stores
knowledge
in
people
and
community
(rather
than
publicaPon)
which
 accommodates
a
faster
rate
of
change
(flux)
–
knowledge
as
a
moving
target
 •  RhizomaPc
knowers
use
a
variety
of
approaches
and
tools,
and
community
to
test/ filter
ideas
(networking
and
the
social
web)
 •  Social
learning
pracPces
and
discursive
knowledge
discovery

 •  Towards
community
as
a
valid
knowledge
repository
and
away
from
packaged
 views
of
knowledge
and
experPse
–
knowledge
as
fluid,
in
transiPon
and
useable
 (Source: Forsythe, 2012 (image))
  • 25. (Source: Class Central, 2012)Impact:
Coursera
 ‘Their
web
classes
consist
of
a
ballet‐like
interplay
between
• 17
internaPonal
insPtuPons
 whiteboard‐style
chalk
talks,
cutaways
to
professors’
own
• USD$22
million
funding
 narraPon,
and
a
steady
procession
of
one‐quesPon
quizzes
• >680,000
students
in
under
12
months
 to
make
sure
students
are
keeping
pace.’

(Anders, 2012)(Ferenstein,
2012)
 ‘tendency
to
conservaPve
approaches’
(Weller, JISC MOOC Webinar,Impact:
edX
 2012) …
‘the
potenPal
missing
element
of
‘See
me’
–
the
• USD$60
million
funding
(Hack,
2012)
 personal
element,.’
…
are
we
making
connecPons
or
just
 throwing
out
content
&
MCQs?’
(White, JISC MOOC Webinar, 2012)
  • 26. MOOCs
as
game‐changers:
students
•  Off‐campus
access
to
universiPes
(Evans in Roscoria, 2012)•  PresPge
higher
educaPon,
for
free:
‘There
is
only
 one
Elvis,
and
only
one
Harvard’
(Marginson, 2012)•  Direct
access
for
recruitment
&
to
job
search
•  Control
&
choice:

 (Skilledup, 2012)•  Supplementary
educaPon
(Gates Foundation, 2012)•  Produce
knowledge‐producing
learners
(Moravec, 2012)
  • 27. NowChoice George
Siemens,
Learning
&
Knowledge
AnalyDcs
Unit
–
Athabasca
University
 2013

  • 28. MOOCs
as
game‐changers:
educators
•  Pressure
on
exisPng
courses
to
look
towards
enhancing
 openness
(Kernohan, 2012)•  Going
back
to
regular
classes
is
impossible
aCer
[MOOCs]
 Wonderland
(Thrun, 2012)•  Unbundled
roles
and
mulPple
players
in
Personal
Learning
 Environments
(PLEs)
(Downes, 2010; 2011) :
‐
who
is
responsible?:
 –  Learner;
Collector;
Curator;
Alchemist;
Programmer;
Salesperson;
 Convener;
Coordinator;
Designer;
Coach;
Agitator;
Facilitator;
Tech
 Support;
Moderator;
CriPc;
Lecturer;
Demonstrator;
Mentor;
 Connector;
Theorizer;

Sharer;
Evaluator;
Bureaucrat.
•  Personal
learning
environments
(Kop, 2010; 2011; Fournier & Kop, 2011)•  Rather
than
replacing
the
teacher,
technology
has
in
many
 ways
increased
the
focus
on
pedagogic
skills.
The
art
of
the
 pracPPoner
as
insPgator,
designer
and
animateur
remains
key
 to
the
process
of
learning
(JISC, 2009, in JISC MOOC Webinar, 2012)
  • 29. ‘When analyzing the disruption potential of MOOCs, it is easy to forget that the actual concept is just 4 or 5 years old. Furthermore, the actual definition of the concept has undergone a significant change in the past 12 months as an entirely new branch has emerged.’ (Hill, 2012) ‘Especially
disturbing
is
that
none
of
the
major
 MOOC
providers
have
hired
anyone
trained
in
 instrucPonal
design,
the
learning
sciences,

 educaPonal
technology,
course
design,
or
other
educaPonal
specialPes
to
help
with
the
design
of
 their
courses.

They
are
hiring
a
lot
of
 programmers…’
 (Source:
Edtechdev,
Wordpress,
2012
in
Siemens,
2012)

  • 30. MOOCs
as
game‐changers:
universiDes
MOOCs
are
one
of
four
economic
pressures
on
US
higher
ed
(King & Sen, 2012): 
 1.  The
Internet:
from
community,
to
exams
and
books;
 2.  Distance
Ed:
US
university
students
taking
online
=
20%
one
course;

 9%
whole
degree
(US DoE, 2011);

 3.  For‐Profit
UniversiPes:
low‐touch
and
no
research
but
high
spend
on
teaching
 (Uni.
of
Phoenix
spends
USD$200
million
per
year
teaching‐related
R&D);
 4.  Online
start‐ups:
MOOCs
as
no‐touch,
profitable
at
scale,
overcome
physical
 limits
to
student
numbers
and
uPlise
exisPng
technology,
people
&
processes
 No.
%
Students
Enrolled
at
public,
private

 No.
US
Colleges/UniversiDes 

&
for‐profit
universiDes (Source: NCES in King & Sen, 2012, p. 6)
  • 31. Barriers
to
sustainability
1.  Developing revenue models to make the concept self-sustaining;2.  Delivering valuable signifiers of completion such as credentials, badges or acceptance into accredited programs;3.  Providing an experience and perceived value that enables higher course completion rates (most today have less than 10% of registered students actually completing the course); and4.  Authenticating students in a manner to satisfy accrediting institutions or hiring companies that the student identify is actually known. (Source: Hill, 2012)
  • 32. CriDcisms
of
MOOCs
•  A
red
herring
that
won’t
solve
higher
ed
being
bust.
The
issues
are
 about
higher
ed,
digital
pedagogy
and
online
learning
(Stommel, 2012)•  Success
is
measured
by
subscripPon
(Cohen, 2012)•  They
remove
teaching
students
from
educaPon
•  Suitability
to
quanPtaPve
subjects,
parPcularly
for
objecPve
quesPons
 and
assessment
(Skilledup, 2012)•  The
difference
between
a
real
college
course
and
a
MOOC
is
like
the
 difference
between
playing
golf
and
watching
golf.
(Vaidhyanathan, 2012)•  …MOOCs
videos
of
talking
heads,
famous
profs
giving
the
same
old
 lectures
they
give
in
their
outdated
face‐to‐face
classrooms.

Really?

 We
think
THIS
is
preparing
students
for
the
21st
century?
Paradigm
 shiC?

No.

Thats
squandering
a
technology,
not
taking
advantage
of
its
 parPcular
affordances
that
cannot
be
duplicated
elsewhere
in
the
 analog,
pre‐digital
world…
(Davidson, 2012)
  • 33. Contextualizing
socio‐cultural
fit
of
technology
uses
…
.
.
we
need
to
think
about
which
technologies
relate
most
deeply
to
what
makes
us
profoundly
human
.
.

 (Source:
Puentedura,
2012)

  • 34. Aligning
uses
of
technologies
in
MOOCs
…
 Paths
and
possibiliDes
of
the
profoundly
human
in
ed
tech

 (Source:
Puentedura,
2012)

  • 35. An
AlternaDve:
Li/le
Open
Online
Courses
 (LOOCs)

 OpenU,

 The
University
of
Maine
 (Kolowich, 2012)
  • 36. MOOC
Dimensions
‐
Pedagogical
•  InstrucPon
‐
quality
and
modality
of
resources
•  InteracPon
‐
forums
and
how
they
are
used
•  Co‐construcPon
‐
students
work
together
to
create
 knowledge
products
(e.g.
wiki)
•  Teachers
input
‐
administraPve
versus
learning
focus
•  Assessment
‐
Peer
marking
vs
automated
•  AccreditaPon
‐
none
versus
cerPficate
versus
full
 qualificaPon

•  New
models
‐
quality
of
informaPon
representaPon
and
 facilitaPng
sharing

  • 37. MOOC
Dimensions
–
InsPtuPonal
•  Purely
for
markePng
•  ArPculaPon/syphon
to
courses
•  AdverPsing
•  InformaPon
harvesPng
•  Small
cost
(Freemium
model)
•  Pay
for
accreditaPon
•  Premium
for
educaPonal
service

  • 38. PotenPal
MOOC
futures
•  PresenPng
delivery
opPons:
 –  On
a
spectrum
with
other
modaliPes
 –  As
a
combinaPve
modality
with
other
delivery
modes
•  PresenPng
pedagogic
alternaPves:
 –  Outcome
specific
learning
design
tools
(eg,
research,
 in‐situ
learning,
community
building
tools,
advanced
 learning
development,
etc)
 –  To
suit
diverse
student
groups
and
to
support
diverse
 learning
needs
•  ContribuPng
to
the
overall
student
experience

•  Contextualizing
uses
with
other
technologies
 (Sources: Skillshare, 2012 (image))
  • 39. [ m 
a
s
s
i
v
e
 o 
p
e
n
 o 
n
l
i
n
e
 ] c 
o
u
r
s
e
s
 Thank
you.
 Contacts:
 jacqueline.kenney@mq.edu.au
 ma/.bower@mq.edu.au


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