Mkt3050 – consumer behavior week 6 april 23, 2012
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  • This webinar covers material from Chapters 10 through 12 in the CB3 textbook.
  • This week we’ll continue the examination of the external factors that affect Consumer Behavior. We covered culture last week and now we’ll talk about reference groups, peers and family
  • We’ll start with a review of reference groups, how they influence us – and how they are different than micro-cultures. We’ll also review changes in the family and household structure that have affected how consumers make decisions. And we’ll begin our discussion of the consumer decision process by examining how consumers identify needs and search for information.
  • Here’s the Consumer Value Framework we’ve been using throughout the course. You’ll see that the external influences – like the internal influences we’ve been discussing – all factor into how consumers define and seek value.
  • As noted here, a reference group is a group of individuals who has relevance for a consumer – AND can influence how the consumer evaluates and behaves. We BELONG to micro cultures… we may / may not belong to a reference group….
  • People within a reference group have common interests – they influence each other – have a set of rules and roles that help them view themselves as members of the group. The photo shows Ozzfest as an example – with heavy metal fans members of this reference group. The attached video talks about another type of reference group focused on helping members build confidence and positive self-image.
  • There are several types of reference groups – primary reference groups, like family, are those we interact with frequently. Secondary reference groups – like a book club or even this class, include people we interact with a bit more infrequently. Reference groups can be formal – with stated expectations about conduct – like church or your employer – or informal, like your book club. Aspirational reference groups are those you want to join to focus on your ideal self – younger children may look to teens as aspirational references about style, language and behavior. Dissociative reference groups are the ‘what not to be’ groups – I don’t want to be thought of as the ‘over 40’ crowd so will try to stay fit and aware of trends.
  • Reference groups can create peer pressure and conformity – two closely related ideas, with peer pressure more explicit action by reference group members to get others to behave a certain way… conformity is driven more by the individual’s choice to follow the attitudes and behaviors of the reference group members. When we hear the term peer-pressure we tend to think of the negative effects group behavior can have on young adults. Well try this on for size—billionaires using peer-pressure to increase philanthropic giving. The intent of the “giving pledge,” founded in the summer of 2010, is to encourage giving from America’s wealthiest citizens in order to address some of America’s most pressing social issues. With an impressive list of names like Warren Buffet, Bill and Melinda Gates, Michael Bloomberg, Barron Hilton, Ted Turner, and George Lucas, the hope is to generate peer-pressure among billionaires, encouraging them toward a large-scale approach to philanthropy
  • Reference groups contain an element of social power, with the types shown here from Exhibit 10.1 in the text.
  • Reference group influence can be ‘felt’ be consumers as information. A teenage girl may look at how other students dress to help her decide the type of style she wants to have…Group influence may also service a purpose… the teenager may conform to a certain style if she thinks that style will help her fit in… And the group may help the teenager express her values… she may adopt a style because she feels it demonstrates who she is…
  • The extent of reference group influence depends on whether consumption is private or public – with public consumption more likely to be influenced. Luxury item choices are also more likely to be affected by others. And when the brand is important, then reference groups have influence.
  • Here’s a diagram that helps illustrate these ideas more clearly….
  • Consumers aren’t influenced equally by reference groups….Those that ARE more likely to look to these external groups are consumers who want to enhance their image by conforming to others – someone may buy an imported beer when out with co-workers, and domestic beer for at-home consumption. And those who are concerned about how others react to their behavior will also be more easily influenced. Consumers who feel more connected to others are also more likely to seek out reference groups. Finally, the degree to which a situation is embarrassing can affect the extent to which a consumer looks to reference groups.
  • While reference groups can influence consumers, family and households – as primary reference groups – can have a stronger affect than other types of groups. A family is defined as 2 or more people who are related to each other in some way who are living together. The types of families are shown here, with your nuclear or immediate family and your extended family are your oriented family – the family you were born into. The procreation family is one formed through marriage and having or adopting children. A household has a broader definition – all persons living in the same housing unit. As family structure becomes less traditional, marketers are becoming more focused on households.
  • The middle set of boxes represents the traditional life cycle of a family… from young single, to young married, to the addition of children…all the way through older unmarried (or widowed adults). But you see that this life cycle has changed, to consider the possibility of divorce, presence of children, and presence of children without a partner. Marketers try to identify the household structure of their target audience because many products are purchased by the family – and individuals within the household can influence purchase.
  • Family members play different roles in the purchase process – they can be concerned with the expenditure or economics of the decision – this is called an instrumental role. For example, the family member with an instrumental role will ask how much money can we afford to spend on a vacation? Or family member can be concerned with the family’s emotional needs – in an expressive role. This family member will ask where can we take a vacation that will be fun for all of us? Family purchases can involve multiple household members, with each person playing one or more roles – the gatekeeper controls information; the influencer provides information after recognizing a need; the user is just that – the one who will use the purchase; the decision maker who makes the final decision; and the purchaser who actually bus the product. Think about a car purchase in a family with 2 adults, and 2 teenagers who drive. The mom works part-time; dad works full-time. Both teens have part-time work and the car will be the third vehicle in the household. One of the teens may likely be an influencer – I need a car to get to work – they may even provide some ideas for the family to consider. There may not be a gatekeeper in this situation…. All family members might be considered users, although the teens are likely the primary target. Mom may be the decision maker – based on her assessment of the safest car for the teens, with dad the purchasers.
  • The changing family structure is now affecting households – with size falling and non-family (non-related) households are projected to grow over the next decades.
  • Because consumers are less connected to family, they look for surrogates to help with decision making.
  • Social media sites continue to build audiences.
  • And marketers are studying how to use social media to reach people
  • Social media is a primary word-of-mouth tool for consumers…. With Opinion Leaders very influential in decision making.
  • Here’s an example of an Opinion Leader as well as good explanation of the role.
  • Other influences on consumers that extend beyond the family include buzz marketing – this can be viral (on line) or through word-of mouth. Take a look at the first attached video – it provided Herman Cain with tremendous ‘buzz’ – essentially free advertising -- based more on a key visual than any of the other content. Stealth marketing – where consumers are supposed to be unaware of marketers efforts, can occur through product placements in movies and TV. Some marketers also have employees pose as consumers to evaluate their peers – and sometimes to influence other shoppers. There are clearly some ethical considerations here… that not all marketers abide by.
  • Now that we’ve talked about the internal and external influences consumers face when making decisions, let’s talk more specifically about the decision making process. This diagram links the consumption process on the left that we talked about in Chapter 1 with the decision-making process on the right. All along the process is the idea of choice – with the goal to find value. Note that the process doesn’t always go in order – sometimes the process isn’t completed (we may stop after evaluating alternatives, for example, and not make a choice or purchase). And decision making is also linked to the ideas of motivation and emotion that we covered earlier in the class. We’re going to talk about need recognition and searching for information this week.
  • There are several perspectives consumers hold when making decisions – as shown here… are any of the perspectives aligned more with hedonic purchases? Maybe experiential and some behavioral. The rational perspective could align with hedonic and utilitarian.
  • How do consumers approach decision making? The approach taken depends on how involved the consumer is in the decision…. And the level of risk associated with making a wrong choice. High involvement / high risk decisions tend to take a longer time…. With low risk / low involvement decisions taking less time. Brand-loyalty tends to push consumers into the low risk / low involvement end of the spectrum – the brand and its performance are known and there’s little risk of making a bad decision as a result. Marketers LOVE to build loyalty because it contributes to faster purchase decisions --
  • Just as participating in the decision process doesn’t always lead to a purchase, need recognition doesn’t always take consumers into the decision process, as shown above. If a consumer is relatively pleased with the current situation (their current TV), then no need for change is recognized. But if I see a great TV, it may spur me to consider a need and start the decision process, even if my current TV is still working. This ‘want’ is really a need – I want to feel like my TV says I’m contemporary / up-to-date (an emotional need linked to my ideal self) . Now if my TV breaks, that clearly leads to recognition that I need a new TV and I head to the store for a new one.
  • A relatively new concept in Consumer Behavior is the idea of ‘need states’ You’ll see above that a need state is defined by a group of consumers who are seeking the same benefits / attributes. Need states can vary within the same consumer, depending on the time / occasion of use.
  • Marketers have a variety of methods for trying to understand needs… several a qualitative as noted above.
  • There are also quantitative tools that allow marketers to examine needs across a larger sample of consumers. A powerful quantitative tool is called a market structure or sometimes, a ‘decision tree’.
  • Here’s an example of a market structure for Salty Snacks. Shoppers group Salty Snacks items primarily by: Usage (single serve, multi-serve, multi-pack single serve) Brand (Frito-Lay, Store Brands, others) Type (chips, healthy/quality, other types) Other factors like size, specific type, and flavor follow and are of different levels of importance throughout the purchase process.
  • Watch the clip about a company called Manifest Digital – and how they include consumer need recognition in their business model. It seems almost common sense doesn’t it? And yet, many companies seem to forget this element of their plan. We’ll have a discussion board and an assignment about need states.
  • After consumers identify a need the search for information about their options begins. They start with an internal search – remember we talked about how the brain is like a computer with lots of files. Consumers will quickly sift through those files for existing information about alternatives for meeting their needs. Then, if internal information isn’t sufficient, they may do an external search for information, talking with friends, reference groups, and family about what THEY know that would help the consumer understand options. Some people just do on-going searches – to stay up-to-date on the latest trends … they LIKE learning about the product of interest and store the information for later decisions. Prepurchase searches are very specific – tied to an immediate need. In all of this, consumers face the risk of information overload – marketers face the challenge of communicating key benefits clearly and quickly about options – that’s why they invest in messaging that tries to create associations and memories for consumers to store – an internal search about options that leads to a choice shortens the decision process.
  • The amount of time dedicated to searching for options depends on the factors above. The more experience a consumer has with the product, the shorter the time. Low involvement and low risk leads to shorter decision-making. Time constraints will affect the search time… as well as how much the consumer likes shopping. If the search is considered valuable – and fits the situation – consumers will spend more time searching. Our second discussion board this week focuses on the search process – and asks you to detail how YOU would search for a new computer – explaining what it takes for a computer brand to make it into your consideration set of alternatives, and the sources you use to learn about your options.

Mkt3050 – consumer behavior week 6 april 23, 2012 Presentation Transcript

  • 1. MKT3050 – Consumer Behavior Seminar Week 6 – April 23, 2012©2012 Cengage Learning. All Rights Reserved. May not be scanned, copied or duplicated, or posted to a publicly accessible website, in whole or in part.
  • 2. Making Decisions Internal factors External factors How you learn Your culture and cultural values Your perception Your reference groups Your memory Peer influenceHow you organize information Social class Attitudes Family influence Your motivation Situation Personal values - atmosphere Personality - timing Lifestyle - conditions Emotional expressiveness 2 ©2012 Cengage Learning. All Rights Reserved. May not be scanned, copied or duplicated, or posted to a publicly accessible website, in whole or in part.
  • 3. Objectives• This week, we’ll examine reference groups and how they are different than micro-cultures. – How are reference groups influence us? How do they deliver value to us?• We’ll also review families and households. – How are families changing? Households? – What effects have these changes had on consumers?• And then we’ll begin discussion the consumer decision process. – How do consumers identify needs? – How do they search for information? 3©2012 Cengage Learning. All Rights Reserved. May not be scanned, copied or duplicated, or posted to a publicly accessible website, in whole or in part.
  • 4. Consumer Value Framework (CVF) 4©2012 Cengage Learning. All Rights Reserved. May not be scanned, copied or duplicated, or posted to a publicly accessible website, in whole or in part.
  • 5. What are Reference Groups? How are they different from Micro cultures? Reference Groups A group of individuals who has significant relevance for a consumer and who impacts the consumer’s evaluations, aspirations, and behavior. So how is this different from micro culture??©2012 Cengage Learning. All Rights Reserved. May not be scanned, copied or duplicated, or posted to a publicly accessible website, in whole or in part.
  • 6. How do Reference Groups influence us? • Group influence refers to • Group members: the ways in which group – Share common goals members influence the and interests attitudes, opinions, and – Communicate with, and behaviors of others within the group. influence, one another – Share a set of expectations, rules, and roles – View themselves as members of a common social unit ©CHARLEY GALLAY/GETTY IMAGES http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=yTo7I3rCLIo©2012 Cengage Learning. All Rights Reserved. May not be scanned, copied or duplicated, or posted to a publicly accessible website, in whole or in part.
  • 7. Types of Groups • Primary – frequent interaction (family) Primary & • Secondary – less frequent (social Secondary groups) brand community • Formal – set of stated rules, codes of conduct (church) • Informal – no membership Formal & requirements, no rules (golf club) Informal • Aspirational – you desire to become a member for your ideal self. Aspirational & • Dissociative – you don’t want to Dissociative belong. The ‘what not to be’ group influence • What are your reference groups?©2012 Cengage Learning. All Rights Reserved. May not be scanned, copied or duplicated, or posted to a publicly accessible website, in whole or in part.
  • 8. Dynamics of Reference Groups Peer Pres The e sure x t ent group to wh mem ich press b ure to ers feel Any peer pressure at Northwood? acco rdanc behave i gr oup e with n expe Conformity ctatio SOURCE: NIDA/NATIONAL INSTITUTE ON DRUG ABUSE ns . A result of group influence in which an individual yields to the attitudes and behavior of others.©2012 Cengage Learning. All Rights Reserved. May not be scanned, copied or duplicated, or posted to a publicly accessible website, in whole or in part.
  • 9. Dynamics of Reference Groups Types of Social Power©2012 Cengage Learning. All Rights Reserved. May not be scanned, copied or duplicated, or posted to a publicly accessible website, in whole or in part.
  • 10. How can Reference Groups influence the behavior of others? • Informational influence – consumers use the behaviors and attitudes of reference groups as information into making their own decisions. – Can occur through observation • Utilitarian influence – consumers conform to group expectations to receive a reward or avoid punishment. – Reward = acceptance • Value-expressive influence – consumers internalize a group’s values or join groups to express their own values and beliefs.©2012 Cengage Learning. All Rights Reserved. May not be scanned, copied or duplicated, or posted to a publicly accessible website, in whole or in part.
  • 11. How can Reference Groups influence the product selection of others? Influence varies depending on… • Public vs private consumption – When seen by others, reference groups may be more important • Luxury vs necessity item – Necessities aren’t as influenced by reference groups • Brand vs type of product is more important – If brand is in play, reference groups will influence public items©2012 Cengage Learning. All Rights Reserved. May not be scanned, copied or duplicated, or posted to a publicly accessible website, in whole or in part.
  • 12. How do Reference Groups Influence Consumer Purchases?• Reference group influences stronger for purchases that are: – Luxuries rather than necessities – Socially conspicuous/visible to others 12©2012 Cengage Learning. All Rights Reserved. May not be scanned, copied or duplicated, or posted to a publicly accessible website, in whole or in part.
  • 13. Individual Difference in Susceptibility to Group Influence Attention to Susceptibility to social interpersonal comparison influences information Separateness - Embarrassment connectedness Which level of Maslow’s hierarchy affects how much groups affect you as an individual? What role does culture play?©2012 Cengage Learning. All Rights Reserved. May not be scanned, copied or duplicated, or posted to a publicly accessible website, in whole or in part.
  • 14. What are Families and Households? • Family defined as: – 2+ people related by blood, marriage, adoption who reside together • Types of families: – Nuclear – immediate family – Extended – includes grandparents, in-laws – Orientation – born into – Procreation – married into • Household Defined as: – All persons, related and unrelated who live in same housing unit • Household importance is growing… – Rapid growth in nontraditional families and non-families 14©2012 Cengage Learning. All Rights Reserved. May not be scanned, copied or duplicated, or posted to a publicly accessible website, in whole or in part.
  • 15. Why is Understanding the Family and Household Structure Important? • Many products purchased by a family unit • Individual buying decisions influenced by family members Middle Aged Divorced no Children Young Divorced Middle Aged no Married no Children Children Young Middle Age Middle Age Divorced or Divorced or Divorced or Single with Single with Single Empty 15©2012 Cengage Learning. All Rights Reserved. May not be scanned, copied or duplicated, or posted to a publicly accessibleNesters Children Children website, in whole or in part.
  • 16. Determining Family Purchases • Roles of family members affect purchase. – Instrumental roles – involve the economics of the purchase – Expressive roles – involve the family’s emotional needs, including upholding norms • Family members can play one or more roles in the decision process: – Gatekeeper Marketers need to identify – Influencer and reach consumers in each of these roles. – User – Decision Maker Family roles differ by micro Culture. – Purchaser 16©2012 Cengage Learning. All Rights Reserved. May not be scanned, copied or duplicated, or posted to a publicly accessible website, in whole or in part.
  • 17. What has happened to Households as a result of changing family structures? • The average household size has fallen in most industrialized countries • Nonfamily households are projected to grow more rapidly than families over the next few decades, but the highest incomes are found among family households. 17©2012 Cengage Learning. All Rights Reserved. May not be scanned, copied or duplicated, or posted to a publicly accessible website, in whole or in part.
  • 18. Because many consumers are less connected to family influences, they look for surrogates to help with decision making ©ANTHONY DEVLIN/PA PHOTOSLANDOV Social Media Social Networks Social Networking Websites 18©2012 Cengage Learning. All Rights Reserved. May not be scanned, copied or duplicated, or posted to a publicly accessible website, in whole or in part.
  • 19. Among Those Who Use Social Media, Facebook is Most Popular Proportion of People Using Various Social Media Sites, Past Month Sites used by less than 10% of respondents Flickr Digg Cozi Windows Live Profile Foursquare TypePad StumbleUpon Reddit Commission Junction Classmates Online MeetUp Badoo Wordpress LinkShare BlogHer Blogger Squidoo Renren Tumblr Orkut Vimeo PinterestN14. Which, if any, of these specific sites, services, or tools have you used during the past 30 days? (1641) ©2012 Cengage Learning. All Rights Reserved. May not be scanned, copied or duplicated, or posted to a publicly accessible website, in whole or in part.
  • 20. Guidelines for Reaching Consumers with Social Media •Social media is a tool you can use to get outside your box and create a more personal and personable relationship with your consumers •If you choose to use social media remember to: •Listen loudly: Employ people to monitor a range of social media platforms and listen to consumers’ conversations about you. •Respond quickly: Try not to let conversations and comments about your brand go unanswered. Respond to your consumers. •Celebrate successes: Gather consumers’ positive feedback and broadcast their words on social media. Let consumers talk for you. •Reinvent yourself: Gather consumers’ feedback and use it to make a better product or improve your services.©2012 Cengage Learning. All Rights Reserved. May not be scanned, copied or duplicated, or posted to a publicly accessible website, in whole or in part.
  • 21. Other Family Surrogates / Group Influences Word-of-Mouth and Opinion Leaders• Word-of-Mouth – Information about products, services, experiences that is transmitted from consumer to consumer • Other consumers more believable than advertising and marketing!• Opinion Leaders – Consumers who have great influence on the behavior of others • Knowledgeable about products • High level of involvement with products • Socially active and confident 21©2012 Cengage Learning. All Rights Reserved. May not be scanned, copied or duplicated, or posted to a publicly accessible website, in whole or in part.
  • 22. Surrogate Consumers / Market Mavens Lisa Belkin | Motherlode Lisas Rankings •#1 Best Written •#2 Most Controversial •#3 Most Useful •#13 2009 Top 50 If you want to know where modern moms are getting their voice, look no further than Lisa Belkin and her wildly successful New York Times blog. Controversial, funny, and always inspiring worthwhile conversation, Motherlode takes the top spot as the must-read mom blog of 2010. Lisa Belkin is the go-to source for the hottest parenting news, whether it’s a national saga unfolding before our eyes or a quietly interesting story that we’d never have found ourselves. http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=tUE84Y22eUg 22©2012 Cengage Learning. All Rights Reserved. May not be scanned, copied or duplicated, or posted to a publicly accessible website, in whole or in part.
  • 23. Other influences on consumers• Buzz Marketing – Through word-of-mouth – Viral (on-line)• http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=iefi-7qXpzk&feature=related• Stealth Marketing – Product placements • http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=wACBAu9coUU – Having employees pose as consumers – Ethics?? 23©2012 Cengage Learning. All Rights Reserved. May not be scanned, copied or duplicated, or posted to a publicly accessible website, in whole or in part.
  • 24. So how do Consumers make decisions? Consumption Process and Decision-Making • CHOICE occurs throughout the process. – These choices are always linked to finding value! • Doesn’t necessarily lead to a product – – May be a service – Participation – Attendance • Decision making is also linked to motivation and emotion©2012 Cengage Learning. All Rights Reserved. May not be scanned, copied or duplicated, or posted to a publicly accessible website, in whole or in part.
  • 25. What types of perspectives do consumers have when making decisions? Consumers don’t follow the same process with each decision. Which perspectives are more aligned with Utilitarian purchases? Hedonic?©2012 Cengage Learning. All Rights Reserved. May not be scanned, copied or duplicated, or posted to a publicly accessible website, in whole or in part.
  • 26. What types of approaches do consumers use when making decisions?• The decision making approach depends on the level of involvement and the level of risk associated with the decision.• Which decision approach is longest?• When a consumer is brand-loyal, which approach is most likely?©2012 Cengage Learning. All Rights Reserved. May not be scanned, copied or duplicated, or posted to a publicly accessible website, in whole or in part.
  • 27. Need Recognition doesn’t always lead to a decisionA ‘want’ is the way in which consumers address a need ! 27 ©2012 Cengage Learning. All Rights Reserved. May not be scanned, copied or duplicated, or posted to a publicly accessible website, in whole or in part.
  • 28. What are ‘Need States’?• Marketers try to uncover the motivations and emotions that underlie a need. The term ‘need states’ was developed in mid-2000.• A need state is defined by a group of consumers who are alike in terms of the product benefits and attributes they seek in a particular use occasion. For the same product, a consumer can experience different need states over the course of the day or across the occasions they will use that particular product. – For instance, a yogurt user may want a product for weight control that fits into her fitness routine for breakfast, and maybe lunch; at these occasions, she would desire a yogurt that is low in calories and fat. – Later in the day, that same person may want an indulgence and seek a yogurt that is sweet, has a bold flavor and is worth the extra calories. 28©2012 Cengage Learning. All Rights Reserved. May not be scanned, copied or duplicated, or posted to a publicly accessible website, in whole or in part.
  • 29. How do Marketers attempt to measure needs?• Focus groups with techniques like .. – laddering (an interviewing method that invites consumers to reveal specifics), – projection (where consumers are asked to role play), – contextual interviews (observing behavior and product/category interactions, either in person or via video diaries), offer insight into consumers’ different usage occasions with the brand and the needs that define them. • These techniques elicit consumer language that describes their need states. Combining consumer language with our own observations allows us to understand the language we should use and the situations we should consider. – Has implications for new product development, brand personality, and messaging. 29©2012 Cengage Learning. All Rights Reserved. May not be scanned, copied or duplicated, or posted to a publicly accessible website, in whole or in part.
  • 30. How do Marketers attempt to measure needs• Quantitative tools like … – online journals and usage diaries (where consumers relay their habits and practices) – attitude and image surveys (consumers react to functional and emotional attributes) – market structure (relating product usage to demographics, needs and occasions) help quantify consumer need states and provide a strategic focus for the marketing plan 30©2012 Cengage Learning. All Rights Reserved. May not be scanned, copied or duplicated, or posted to a publicly accessible website, in whole or in part.
  • 31. Example Market Structure• Lays • Chips • Potato Chips • Potato Chips • Pretzels • Lays• Ruffles • Store Brand • Cheese Puffs • Cheese Puffs • Tortilla Chips • Ruffles• Cheetos • Other Brands • Tortilla Chips • Popcorn • Corn Chips • Cheetos• Fritos • Popcorn • Corn Chips • Snack Mix • Pita & Bagel Chips • Fritos• Doritos • Pretzels • Multi-Grain • Pork Rinds • Doritos• Sun Chips • Multi-Grain • Pretzels • Veggie, Rice, • Potato Chips• Baked Snacks • Snack Mix • Popcorn Potato Snk, etc… • Baked • Pork Rinds • Snack Mix • Multi-Packs • Light • Other Snacks • Veggie, Rice, • Large Sizes • Natural Pita, other chips • Canisters • Kettle 31©2012 Cengage Learning. All Rights Reserved. May not be scanned, copied or duplicated, or posted to a publicly accessible website, in whole or in part.
  • 32. Need and Search: Web Design • Watch this clip on Manifest Digital’s successful use of consumer need recognition. 12_ Manifest Digital.wmvWhat does Manifest Digital mean when it How has this philosophy contributed to thesays its philosophy is based on “user company’s success?centered principles?” ©2012 Cengage Learning. All Rights Reserved. May not be scanned, copied or duplicated, or posted to a publicly accessible website, in whole or in part.
  • 33. After Consumers identify a Need and decide to seek value, the Search begins! Ongoing – Prepurchase staying up- – to help to-date with decision Information Overload Internal – External – retrieve family, stored info friends, groups©2012 Cengage Learning. All Rights Reserved. May not be scanned, copied or duplicated, or posted to a publicly accessible website, in whole or in part.
  • 34. How much to search? • Product experience • Time availability • Involvement • Attitudes towards • Perceived risk shopping • Value of search effort • Personal factors • Situational influencers©2012 Cengage Learning. All Rights Reserved. May not be scanned, copied or duplicated, or posted to a publicly accessible website, in whole or in part.