• Save
Hybrid Language for multi-lingual society
Upcoming SlideShare
Loading in...5
×
 

Like this? Share it with your network

Share

Hybrid Language for multi-lingual society

on

  • 1,911 views

The purpose of this paper is to investigate into the unique position of Hong Kong, both geometrically and culturally, as a blender of Western and Eastern cultures, and create design principles and ...

The purpose of this paper is to investigate into the unique position of Hong Kong, both geometrically and culturally, as a blender of Western and Eastern cultures, and create design principles and solution for multi-lingual and multi-cultural information design.

Having a history as a British colony for over 150 years, Hong Kong has become an interesting hybrid of Western and Eastern cultures where new forms of visual communication have been evolved and developed. New words, new letterforms, contradicting reading patterns and unique graphic icons are designed with characteristic of both cultures.

Chinese letterforms are evolved basically from pictograms that represent objects, actions, events and sounds. Every Chinese character has its own meaning, or even has more than one meaning. This is very different from roman alphabets where the meaning of words comes from the combination of letters but not from individual alphabet. Therefore it is interesting to see how the two languages come together in bilingual conditions. It could be a burden, but the chemistry could also be inspirational.

Hong Kong has her reputation of being flexible and adaptive. Hong Kong people, with their wisdom and energy, extract essential parts of western and eastern cultures and blend together in any ways they see fit. This is interesting and especially obvious in local living experience and daily life of Hong Kong citizens. Examples could be found in signage system, magazine design, charts and diagrams and in menu design, etc.

The situation is becoming more complicated after hand-over to Mainland China after 1997. Hong Kong is moving from bi-lingual city to tri-lingual if not multi-lingual. Simplified Chinese has been added to the list of common written language under English and Traditional Chinese. The information hierarchy and visual balance in typographic design becomes great challenges for information designers.

Hong Kong has its own complex contextual information structure because of its high urban density and mixture of population from all over the world. Like other modern cosmopolitan cities, Hong Kong is overflowed with information and visual signals, and many of them are more of visual noise than useful information. Information designers have to develop new tactics and methodologies in design so as to maintain the accuracy and relevancy of information itself but at the same time to stand out from the rest of the world and arouse the attention of audience.

Are there rules and principles in information design that we can innovate when we need to blend different cultures together seamlessly?

In the debate of Globalization Vs Localization, what is the balance between preserving strong local c

Statistics

Views

Total Views
1,911
Views on SlideShare
1,703
Embed Views
208

Actions

Likes
1
Downloads
0
Comments
0

5 Embeds 208

http://jacksonchoi.com 196
http://www.linkedin.com 5
http://us-w1.rockmelt.com 3
https://twitter.com 3
http://translate.googleusercontent.com 1

Accessibility

Upload Details

Uploaded via as Adobe PDF

Usage Rights

© All Rights Reserved

Report content

Flagged as inappropriate Flag as inappropriate
Flag as inappropriate

Select your reason for flagging this presentation as inappropriate.

Cancel
  • Full Name Full Name Comment goes here.
    Are you sure you want to
    Your message goes here
    Processing…
Post Comment
Edit your comment

Hybrid Language for multi-lingual society Presentation Transcript

  • 1. CULTURAL BLENDERS in HONG KONG Cultural BLENDERS in Hong Kong: East meets West Choi Chi Kit, Jackson HKDI, Hong Kong ckchoi@vtc.edu.hk
  • 2. CULTURAL BLENDERS in HONG KONG Hybrid Language for multi-lingual society Cultural BLENDERS in Hong Kong: East meets West Choi Chi Kit, Jackson HKDI, Hong Kong ckchoi@vtc.edu.hk
  • 3. CULTURAL BLENDERS in HONG KONG 1 » INTRODUCTIONIntroduction » The purpose of this presentation is to investigate into the unique position of Hong Kong, both geometrically and culturally, as a blender of Western and Eastern cultures, and analyze design possibility for multi-lingual and multi-cultural communication «
  • 4. CULTURAL BLENDERS in HONG KONG 1 » INTRODUCTION Hong Kong Photo by ixfd64/Danny
  • 5. CULTURAL BLENDERS in HONG KONG 1 » INTRODUCTION Hong Kong is in the south of Guangdong Province
  • 6. CULTURAL BLENDERS in HONG KONG 1 » INTRODUCTION Hong Kong Hong Kong is in the Southern China
  • 7. CULTURAL BLENDERS in HONG KONG 1 » INTRODUCTION Hong Kong Hong Kong is in the heart of Asia
  • 8. CULTURAL BLENDERS in HONG KONG 1 » INTRODUCTION Hong Kong Hong Kong is in the center of Pan Asia Region
  • 9. CULTURAL BLENDERS in HONG KONG 1 » INTRODUCTION Having a history as a British colony for over 150 years, Hong Kong has become an interesting hybrid of Western and Eastern cultures where new forms of visual communication have been evolved and developed.
  • 10. CULTURAL BLENDERS in HONG KONG 1 » INTRODUCTION Hand over in 1997 means return Uncertainty? Anxiety!
  • 11. CULTURAL BLENDERS in HONG KONG 1 » INTRODUCTION Before 1997 After 1997 Verbal Language   Cantonese Cantonese    English English Putonghua Written Language Traditional Chinese Traditional Chinese English Simplified Chinese English 
  • 12. CULTURAL BLENDERS in HONG KONG 2  NEW LANGUAGE IN MULTICULTURAL SOCIETY2  New Language in Multicultural Society
  • 13. CULTURAL BLENDERS in HONG KONG 1 » INTRODUCTION IN MULTICULTURAL SOCIETY 2  NEW LANGUAGE 2 NEW LANGUAGE IN MULTICULTURAL SOCIETY New Language in multicultural society In Hong Kong, both Western and Eastern cultures have been imported, merged, mixed, combined together in various aspects like customs and manners, festivals and living styles. Big SALE
  • 14. CULTURAL BLENDERS in HONG KONG 2  NEW LANGUAGE IN MULTICULTURAL SOCIETY »What is affecting the quality of communication in Bilingual society?«
  • 15. CULTURAL BLENDERS in HONG KONG 2  NEW LANGUAGE IN MULTICULTURAL SOCIETY 2.1  EXCHANGE AND BLENDING OF LANGUAGE2.1  Exchange and Blending of Languages
  • 16. CULTURAL BLENDERS in HONG KONG 2  NEW LANGUAGE IN MULTICULTURAL SOCIETY 2.1  EXCHANGE AND BLENDING OF LANGUAGES over 95% of local citizens are Chinese who speaks mainly Cantonese and Putonghua.
  • 17. CULTURAL BLENDERS in HONG KONG 2  NEW LANGUAGE IN MULTICULTURAL SOCIETY 2.1  EXCHANGE AND BLENDING OF LANGUAGES Apart from Cantonese speaking citizens; there are immigrants migrated from Mainland China and Taiwan who speak Putonghua and Mandarin, there are foreigners from Western countries who speak mainly English; and there are considerable amount of workforce from the Pan Asia regions. Hong Kong is just like a United Nation.
  • 18. CULTURAL BLENDERS in HONG KONG 2  NEW LANGUAGE IN MULTICULTURAL SOCIETY 2.1  EXCHANGE AND BLENDING OF LANGUAGES In the book entitled “Languages in Contact: Findings and Problems”, Uriel Weinreich made a distinction between different types of bilingualism:
  • 19. CULTURAL BLENDERS in HONG KONG 2  NEW LANGUAGE IN MULTICULTURAL SOCIETY 2.1  EXCHANGE AND BLENDING OF LANGUAGES 1. The co-ordinative type of bilingualism applies to individuals who have two functionally independent systems.
  • 20. CULTURAL BLENDERS in HONG KONG 2  NEW LANGUAGE IN MULTICULTURAL SOCIETY 2.1  EXCHANGE AND BLENDING OF LANGUAGES 2. The compound type of bilingualism applies to individuals who have two linguistic signs.
  • 21. CULTURAL BLENDERS in HONG KONG 2  NEW LANGUAGE IN MULTICULTURAL SOCIETY 2.1  EXCHANGE AND BLENDING OF LANGUAGES 3. The sub-ordinative type of bilingualism applies to individuals who have dominant in one language. They have two linguistic signs but only one unit of meaning, which is that of the dominant language.
  • 22. CULTURAL BLENDERS in HONG KONG 2  NEW LANGUAGE IN MULTICULTURAL SOCIETY 2.1  EXCHANGE AND BLENDING OF LANGUAGES Hong Kong is of the sub-ordinative type of bilingualism where Chinese/ Cantonese is the dominant language.
  • 23. CULTURAL BLENDERS in HONG KONG 2  NEW LANGUAGE IN MULTICULTURAL SOCIETY 2.1  EXCHANGE AND BLENDING OF LANGUAGESInterference Bilinguals cannot find their words in non-native context, even with their mother tongue. The words that do come to their lips are those belonging to the other language.
  • 24. CULTURAL BLENDERS in HONG KONG 2  NEW LANGUAGE IN MULTICULTURAL SOCIETY 2.1  EXCHANGE AND BLENDING OF LANGUAGES To deal with this problem, the skill employed by bilinguals is called code switching. There are two basic concepts of code switching. 1. Borrowing 2. Language choice
  • 25. CULTURAL BLENDERS in HONG KONG 2  NEW LANGUAGE IN MULTICULTURAL SOCIETY 2.1  EXCHANGE AND BLENDING OF LANGUAGES 1. Borrowing: It starts when new imported objects from one culture do not have relevant counterpart in another culture. People will use direct phonetic translation and find words of similar pronunciation to call those objects.
  • 26. CULTURAL BLENDERS in HONG KONG 2  NEW LANGUAGE IN MULTICULTURAL SOCIETY 2.1  EXCHANGE AND BLENDING OF LANGUAGES Borrowed words phonetic translation to Chinese bus taxi egg tart toast  store
  • 27. CULTURAL BLENDERS in HONG KONG 2  NEW LANGUAGE IN MULTICULTURAL SOCIETY 2.1  EXCHANGE AND BLENDING OF LANGUAGES Borrowed words English words with Chinese origin kung fu zen dim sum coolie  gweilo
  • 28. CULTURAL BLENDERS in HONG KONG 2  NEW LANGUAGE IN MULTICULTURAL SOCIETY 2.1  EXCHANGE AND BLENDING OF LANGUAGES Borrowing also applies where a word or expression from one language is used in the other, it is made to comply with the rules of grammar or pronunciation of the second language.
  • 29. CULTURAL BLENDERS in HONG KONG 2  NEW LANGUAGE IN MULTICULTURAL SOCIETY 2.1  EXCHANGE AND BLENDING OF LANGUAGES “Do you understand?” You = Understand = “ ?” “ ” “ ” “ ?”
  • 30. CULTURAL BLENDERS in HONG KONG 2  NEW LANGUAGE IN MULTICULTURAL SOCIETY 2.1  EXCHANGE AND BLENDING OF LANGUAGES Chinese English
  • 31. CULTURAL BLENDERS in HONG KONG 2  NEW LANGUAGE IN MULTICULTURAL SOCIETY 2.1  EXCHANGE AND BLENDING OF LANGUAGES 2. language choice, where the speaker changes from one language to another according to the person he is speaking to.
  • 32. CULTURAL BLENDERS in HONG KONG 2  NEW LANGUAGE IN MULTICULTURAL SOCIETY 2.1  EXCHANGE AND BLENDING OF LANGUAGES Youngsters are trying to establish their own community by creating a language, which can only be understood by members of their own tribe. » » Rise of NEW language
  • 33. CULTURAL BLENDERS in HONG KONG 2  NEW LANGUAGE IN MULTICULTURAL SOCIETY 2.2  BASIC STRUCTURE AND PRINCIPLES OF CHINESE CHARACTERS Chinese characters are evolved basically from pictographs that represent objects, actions, events and sounds since 5000BC.
  • 34. CULTURAL BLENDERS in HONG KONG 2  NEW LANGUAGE IN MULTICULTURAL SOCIETY 2.2  BASIC STRUCTURE AND PRINCIPLES OF CHINESE CHARACTERS Pictogram Development of Chinese character Fish
  • 35. CULTURAL BLENDERS in HONG KONG 2  NEW LANGUAGE IN MULTICULTURAL SOCIETY 2.2  BASIC STRUCTURE AND PRINCIPLES OF CHINESE CHARACTERS Oracle Bone script
  • 36. CULTURAL BLENDERS in HONG KONG 2  NEW LANGUAGE IN MULTICULTURAL SOCIETY 2.2  BASIC STRUCTURE AND PRINCIPLES OF CHINESE CHARACTERS Metal script
  • 37. CULTURAL BLENDERS in HONG KONG 2  NEW LANGUAGE IN MULTICULTURAL SOCIETY 2.2  BASIC STRUCTURE AND PRINCIPLES OF CHINESE CHARACTERS Seal script
  • 38. CULTURAL BLENDERS in HONG KONG 2  NEW LANGUAGE IN MULTICULTURAL SOCIETY 2.2  BASIC STRUCTURE AND PRINCIPLES OF CHINESE CHARACTERS Clerical script
  • 39. CULTURAL BLENDERS in HONG KONG 2  NEW LANGUAGE IN MULTICULTURAL SOCIETY 2.2  BASIC STRUCTURE AND PRINCIPLES OF CHINESE CHARACTERS Regular script
  • 40. CULTURAL BLENDERS in HONG KONG 2  NEW LANGUAGE IN MULTICULTURAL SOCIETY 2.2  BASIC STRUCTURE AND PRINCIPLES OF CHINESE CHARACTERS Cursive script
  • 41. CULTURAL BLENDERS in HONG KONG 2  NEW LANGUAGE IN MULTICULTURAL SOCIETY 2.2  BASIC STRUCTURE AND PRINCIPLES OF CHINESE CHARACTERS Every Chinese character has its own meaning, or even has more than one meaning. This is very different from roman alphabets where the meaning of words comes from the combination of letters but not from individual alphabet.
  • 42. CULTURAL BLENDERS in HONG KONG 2  NEW LANGUAGE IN MULTICULTURAL SOCIETY 2.2  BASIC STRUCTURE AND PRINCIPLES OF CHINESE CHARACTERS Light is the combination of Moon and Sun. Book is the image of 2 hands holding a roll of bamboo sticks.
  • 43. CULTURAL BLENDERS in HONG KONG 2  NEW LANGUAGE IN MULTICULTURAL SOCIETY 2.2  BASIC STRUCTURE AND PRINCIPLES OF CHINESE CHARACTERS Wood and pot Lid Wine bottle Herbs  Prepare bottle with ingredients and herbs, then cover it with weighted objects such as wood and pot, then wait the wine to ferment. > WINE > fragrant > depress > suppress
  • 44. CULTURAL BLENDERS in HONG KONG 2  NEW LANGUAGE IN MULTICULTURAL SOCIETY2.3 Development of ‘Martian’ Characters The history of Chinese Character development has a dramatic twist when the Internet becomes popular. Young online surfers attempt to establish their own community and social groups as a rebellious gesture against the adult society.
  • 45. CULTURAL BLENDERS in HONG KONG 2  NEW LANGUAGE IN MULTICULTURAL SOCIETY 2.3  DEVELOPMENT OF MARTIAN LANGUAGE Martian language appears as a new sub- culture language on the Internet, mostly for fun. This can be considered part of a statement used to achieve differentiation purpose and to articulate cultural identity.
  • 46. CULTURAL BLENDERS in HONG KONG 2  NEW LANGUAGE IN MULTICULTURAL SOCIETY 2.3  DEVELOPMENT OF MARTIAN LANGUAGEMartian #01 Homophonous, wrongly written characterMartian #02 To break down a word into twoMartian #03 By combining sounds of two words and represent thesound with one character 3Q pronounce like Thank you.Martian #04 Cantonese phonetic transcription wo ng g nei kong mud ar =
  • 47. CULTURAL BLENDERS in HONG KONG 2  NEW LANGUAGE IN MULTICULTURAL SOCIETY 2.3  DEVELOPMENT OF MARTIAN LANGUAGEMartian #05 Use character with some features resembling therequired character. } { =
  • 48. CULTURAL BLENDERS in HONG KONG 2  NEW LANGUAGE IN MULTICULTURAL SOCIETY 2.3  DEVELOPMENT OF MARTIAN LANGUAGEMartian #06 Mixed usage with graphic Icons. ;-) :-p Orz :-O OTZ 8-) OTL verticon emoticon
  • 49. CULTURAL BLENDERS in HONG KONG 2  NEW LANGUAGE IN MULTICULTURAL SOCIETY 2.3  DEVELOPMENT OF MARTIAN LANGUAGE Combined character like emoticon? 両
  • 50. CULTURAL BLENDERS in HONG KONG 2  NEW LANGUAGE IN MULTICULTURAL SOCIETY » Chinese and English could be amazingly similar visually «
  • 51. CULTURAL BLENDERS in HONG KONG 2  NEW LANGUAGE IN MULTICULTURAL SOCIETY English alphabets look like Chinese Seal Script
  • 52. CULTURAL BLENDERS in HONG KONG 2  NEW LANGUAGE IN MULTICULTURAL SOCIETY
  • 53. CULTURAL BLENDERS in HONG KONG 2  NEW LANGUAGE IN MULTICULTURAL SOCIETY
  • 54. CULTURAL BLENDERS in HONG KONG3  Lost in Translation
  • 55. CULTURAL BLENDERS in HONG KONG 3  LOST IN TRANSLATION 3.2  TO READ AND TO BE READ “Who is the potential reader?”
  • 56. CULTURAL BLENDERS in HONG KONG 3  LOST IN TRANSLATION 3.2  TO READ AND TO BE READ Customer can only know the pronunciations of the product name but not the actual meaning of it.
  • 57. CULTURAL BLENDERS in HONG KONG 3  LOST IN TRANSLATION 3.2  TO READ AND TO BE READ means Stir-Fried Beef Rice Noodle means dry, but also means to have sex; is rice noodle, but also means river. It is translated literally to Fuck to fry the cow river.
  • 58. CULTURAL BLENDERS in HONG KONG 3  LOST IN TRANSLATION 3.2  TO READ AND TO BE READ The week beats the fish soup The day type fries the black winter Three silk soup idea powder Slippery Chicken in Mushroom Gruel
  • 59. CULTURAL BLENDERS in HONG KONG 2  NEW LANGUAGE IN MULTICULTURAL SOCIETY » How effective can translation be if the context is missing? «
  • 60. INFORMATION DESIGN CULTURAL BLENDERS in HONG KONG CHARTS & DIAGRAM 3  LOST IN TRANSLATION 3.2  TO READ AND TO BE READ There are experiments in putting multiple languages together, and hope to design something that can communicate across culture but at the same time to maintain cultural identity.
  • 61. CULTURAL BLENDERS in HONG KONG 3  LOST IN TRANSLATION 3.2  TO READ AND TO BE READ Analysis of research 3
  • 62. CULTURAL BLENDERS in HONG KONG 3  LOST IN TRANSLATION 3.2  TO READ AND TO BE READ Happy New Year of Goat
  • 63. CULTURAL BLENDERS in HONG KONG 3  LOST IN TRANSLATION Hair See Use photographic images to work with Chinese Characters to express the meaning of words, such as SEE and HAIR Stanley Wong
  • 64. CULTURAL BLENDERS in HONG KONG 4  CONCLUSION4  Conclusion
  • 65. CULTURAL BLENDERS in HONG KONG 4  CONCLUSION Hong Kong people, with their wisdom and energy, extract essential parts of western and eastern cultures and blend together in any ways they see fit.
  • 66. CULTURAL BLENDERS in HONG KONG 4  CONCLUSION What is the balance between preserving strong local culture characteristic and at the same time being understandable for audience of another culture? Could we design a hybrid language that allow communicative elements of different language to co- exist? And is easy to comprehend too?
  • 67. CULTURAL BLENDERS in HONG KONG 4  CONCLUSION Now may be a good time to evaluate the possibility of using new form of language in a wider perspective, like emoticon, Martian language and Chinglish.
  • 68. CULTURAL BLENDERS in HONG KONG 3  LOST IN TRANSLATION 3.2  TO READ AND TO BE READ Roll To cut Forbidden One Stone two Birds 两
  • 69. CULTURAL BLENDERS in HONG KONG 3  LOST IN TRANSLATION 3.2  TO READ AND TO BE READ English alphabets composed into graphic forms that look like Chinese. Xu Bing, Art for the People
  • 70. CULTURAL BLENDERS in HONG KONG 3  LOST IN TRANSLATION 3.2  TO READ AND TO BE READ to facilitate the effectiveness of communication as well as maintaining the cultural characteristics. Horse Hate
  • 71. CULTURAL BLENDERS in HONG KONG Hybrid Language for multi-lingual society
  • 72. CULTURAL BLENDERS in HONG KONG » THANK YOU