Impression  Management  Final For Voice Over
Upcoming SlideShare
Loading in...5
×

Like this? Share it with your network

Share
  • Full Name Full Name Comment goes here.
    Are you sure you want to
    Your message goes here
    Be the first to comment
No Downloads

Views

Total Views
1,275
On Slideshare
1,274
From Embeds
1
Number of Embeds
1

Actions

Shares
Downloads
46
Comments
0
Likes
1

Embeds 1

http://www.slideshare.net 1

Report content

Flagged as inappropriate Flag as inappropriate
Flag as inappropriate

Select your reason for flagging this presentation as inappropriate.

Cancel
    No notes for slide
  • Smile, someone may already be watching you! The true success of any interview begins the second you enter the employer’s property and they, or perhaps even their security cameras, lay eyes on you. As you enter the company’s parking lot, you should begin thinking and acting as though you are already being assessed by them. Because…you are! Did you know that your critical “first impressions” with an employer are made well before you have even had the opportunity to articulate a single word??!! Whether you realize it or not, regardless of the impressive skills, education, and work experience you may possess, or how polished you have become at articulating thoughtful responses to interview questions, many hiring managers will form a lasting impression and make assumptions about you based solely upon the way you dress, act, and carry yourself before the actual interview has even begun. So think twice before you speed into the parking lot, be kind and courteous to the valet that may park your vehicle, and above all…be on your best behavior whenever you have an interaction of any kind with the real “eyes and ears” of any company…the front desk receptionist.
  • The most effective and successful interviewers are people who have mastered the art of being able to listen during an interview with both their eyes and ears, and then are able to use the information that they have gathered to succinctly, thoughtfully, and professionally respond to an interviewer in both a verbal and non verbal manner. After all, if you are incapable of demonstrating to an employer that you can effectively manage these critical areas of “impression management”, then it is likely that it will not be a stretch for them to also conclude that you would be incapable of making sound decisions if they decided to hire you. According to Greg Hartley, a former Army interrogator and expert in body language and human behavior, 85% of what two individuals communicate to each other occurs as a result of the non verbal signals we send through our use of gestures, tone of voice, facial expressions, use of space, posture, and a number of other involuntarily messages that our body may send. Consequently, your ability to successfully demonstrate to a potential employer that you have the knowledge and ability to appropriately send correct non-verbal cues and also react appropriately and professionally to the ones being sent to you is critical. In fact, the level of ability you demonstrate during an interview to effectively manage and react to non verbal signals, actually demonstrates more to an employer about your abilities and potential to be able to make a meaningful and lasting contribution to their work environment, than anything you actually say to them. Transition: The intent of this workshop is to provide you with the necessary knowledge and tools to begin practicing and eventually mastering the critical art of “impression management.” But first, let’s review all the different areas that we will cover in this workshop, and start by first examining exactly what “impression management” is.
  • During this workshop, we will cover the following critical areas of impression management: Definition of impression management? Company and interviewer considerations General attire basics Gender specific interview attire guidelines Body language/nonverbal communication Transition: As you begin to take advantage of this workshop, do not hesitate to use the navigation instructions and functionality provided in order to spend as much or as little time in each of these areas as you may need. There is a lot of valuable information to digest in this workshop, so take your time.
  • So what is impression management? It’s a fancy way of describing how a person actively tries to manage how their overall presentation of themselves is perceived by others. The formal dictionary definition is: “the process through which people try to control the impressions other people form of them. It is a goal-directed conscious or unconscious attempt to influence the perceptions of other people about a person, object or event by regulating and controlling information in social interactions. It is usually used synonymously with self-presentation, if a person tries to influence the perception of their image”. In short, effective impression management during an interview involves being conscientious of the impression that you will make with a potential employer by managing what you wear and how you wear it, along with what you say and do, and how and when you say and do them. Some important factors to think about include the tone you use, body language (or non verbal communication style), overall attire and grooming, and your ability to appropriately manage and control your reactions to anything that you may see or hear before, during, and after your interview.
  • Are you still a little unsure about what “impression management” is? Don’t worry, by the end of this workshop you will most certainly know! Exercise: Before you begin to learn about some of the skills, wardrobe essentials, and non verbal skills that are instrumental in your ability to effectively master the art of “impression management”, we thought you might enjoy taking a few minutes to review the pictures on this slide in order to see if you are able to determine how these individuals may or may not be doing an effective job of managing the impression that they would like to create during a professional job interview. So take a quick look…what impression management faux pas do you see? Do any of these candidates create the “perfect impression”? [PAUSE HERE FOR 30 SECONDS TO LET THEM IDENTIFY ‘NO-NO’S’] HERE’S WHAT WE FOUND: Answers: Point to infractions with arrows as you say them Twirling hair Chewing gum Black “friendship bracelet” No nylons on women in skirt Woman’s skirt too short for a professional interview Slit too high in woman’s skirt Man in suit is not cleanly shaved Man’s shirt collar is outside of his jacket Man’s jacket should be buttoned during an interview Transition: Were you able to identify all the impression management infractions in the photos? What was the first impression that these individuals made on you. Was it a positive one? Would you hire them? Or, would their appearance and presentation of themselves turn you off in some way? As you can see from these pictures, appearances are significantly important. So let’s start learning about how you can ensure that you do not leave these types of impressions during any of your interviews.
  • You are more likely to command respect and achieve your desired impression and outcome during an interview if you are able to dress, act, react, and speak appropriately for your surroundings. Its important to realize that each company, industry, geographic area of the country, and interviewer has its own unique personality, style, preferences, culture, and environment. As a result, no two interview situations that you encounter should ever be treated in exactly the same manner. Part of any successful interview preparation includes making sure that you have positioned yourself to take full advantage of all the information that is available about both the company and your interviewers as early in the interview process as possible, and before you begin actual interview preparations. Once you feel as though you are adequately equipped with all the necessary company and interviewer information, you will want to use it in order to ensure that the impression you think you need to create through your attire, body language, and verbal responses is indeed the desired impression that the company and its decision makers are searching for.
  • Some of the areas that you will want to acquire as much information as possible include: The culture and environment of the company The type of industry they are in The level of position that you will be interviewing for Information about the person or persons that you will be interviewing with Geographic differences Current standing in the marketplace Current or anticipated challenges for the company and industry Before you start spending an excessive amount of time researching for the answers to these questions or begin contacting company representatives to find out, take a minute or two to consider and reflect on what you may already know. it is likely that the person that scheduled the interview with you provided you with some of this information. And, if you have already had a phone interview with the company or a recruiter, than you probably learned a lot of helpful and valuable information during that experience as well. You can begin filling in any gaps by researching them online using such resources as LinkedIn, Hoovers.com, Google, and the company’s website. You may surprise yourself about how much information you already have and/or can readily locate online. It is important to realize that if, after you have exhausted all your online and current interview notes you still need more information prior to your interview, it is perfectly acceptable to ask either the person that scheduled the interview with you or someone in the company’s Human Resources department to get the answers that you need. We cannot emphasize enough, the importance of making sure that you perform your due diligence on both the company and the interviewers before you arrive for the actual interview. Resist the temptation to make assumptions or jump to any conclusions during this process, and make sure that you invest the necessary time (and in some cases legwork) that is needed in order to ensure that your information is accurate. Transition: Once you have information about the company and your interviewers in hand, you can start to form a much more accurate picture regarding what kind of an individual and image the company may be looking for. Now it’s time to start thinking about what color and style of interview attire might be appropriate for the occasion. But wait, before you start running off to the mall to purchase a suit, you will want to understand basic interview wardrobe expectations. And also take some time to consider what type of a message you may be sending to an employer simply because of the color, style, and fit of your business suit. So first, let’s begin by learning about some general guidelines associated with interview attire.
  • You don’t need a lot of clothing, money, or accessories to dress appropriately for an interview, but you do need the right ones. What you wear and how you wear it reveals a lot of information about you to a potential employer. So, making sure that you have selected interview attire that is the right color, style, fit, and price point in order to compliment and accentuate your body’s strengths, minimize any imperfections, project the image that you are trying to achieve, and not financially set you back a small fortune in the process are critical. It’s also important to remember that we are all unique individuals with different body types. Don’t make the assumption that just because an outfit looks amazing on your friend that it will also great on you. Additionally, when you know that you “look the part” for your interview, it will likely boost your overall self-confidence and quality of your presentation during your interview. Being able to show a potential employer that you are comfortable and confident when interviewing is one of the best ways to ensure that an interviewer will have a positive overall perception of your presentation.
  • Interviewers will invariably tell you that your overall appearance during an interview is very important because it can sometimes tell them more about you than the actual interview itself. Yes, you heard that right. Your appearance can, and often does, tell an interviewer more about you than the actual interview itself. However, it is important to keep the intended role of your attire in the appropriate perspective. While it is certainly important, it should not serve as the main or only focal point during your interview. After all, you want the interviewer to focus on YOU and what YOU can contribute to their work environment. You do NOT want them focusing on things in your appearance that may be distracting such as multiple facial piercings, unkempt hair, or the fact that you have forgotten to wear deodorant or zip your pants. Your objective with your attire and overall appearance should be to have it play an “ancillary and complimentary role” in the entire interview process. Yu also want to make sure that it doesn’t get in the way of what might otherwise have been a very positive interview experience. Following are a few general interview attire guidelines that should prove to be quite useful: When in doubt, it is better to overdress than under dress for an interview, and it is also a good idea to dress at least one level higher than the level of the position for which you are interviewing. Put on your entire interview attire a few days before the interview to make sure you feel comfortable and confident in it. Does it still fit well? Does it need to be pressed? And make sure that all your accessories are the right choice. Right before the actual interview, visit the restroom and perform one last full mirror check of your entire outfit from all it’s view points…front, back, and side. When you have invested the necessary time to make sure that you are dressed appropriately for your interview, it communicates several important messages to the hiring manager: Shows that you take the interview process and their role in it seriously Shows that you have taken the time to research and understand the industry and culture of the company, demonstrating how interested in the position you are as well as your ability to pay attention to detail. Demonstrates that you are capable of making good decisions if hired Shows that you have an appreciation for the importance of portraying a professional image in the workplace THIS IS STEP ONE OF IMPRESSION MANAGEMENT
  • Regardless of the industry or level of position you may be interviewing for, your interview attire should be simple, conservative, professional, and consistent with the brand, image, and story that you have already painted through your resume, cover letter, and online presence. For example, you wouldn’t want to arrive to a professional interview dressed in a t-shirt, if you have portrayed yourself as a conservative and conscientious professional. Always make sure that your attire is neat, clean, ironed/pressed, stain-free, and in good condition. Now is not the time to neglect to press the collar on your shirt, forget to remove the lint on your suit, or decide that is it not important to replace that missing button on your suit because you think that no one will notice. Your attire should also communicate to an employer that you are mature, organized, and above all that you would be a great representative for the company.
  • Having the knowledge and ability to arrive for your interview knowing that you are dressed professionally and appropriately for the occasion will boost your self confidence. This increase in your confidence level will undoubtedly help you to present yourself well which, in turn, will increase the likelihood that you will make a favorable impression. It is also important to understand that the interview attire you wear, and how you wear it, is usually used as a litmus test by an interviewer in order to determine your ability to make sound decisions, as well as help them to decide whether or not they think that you will be a good “cultural fit” for their organization. So do your homework on the organization, industry, and individuals that you will be interviewing with and spend some time window shopping before you decide on the right color, style, fit, and price point for the interview attire needed for your particular situation. ******************************************************************************************************************************** Exercise: What does your current interview attire say about you? Take a minute to think about what your current interview attire says about you? Is the image you are currently portraying the right one? Are you sending the right message to the individuals you interview or does your current choice of interview attire send the wrong message? ******************************************************************************************************************************************************* Transition: Now that you have thought a little bit about your current wardrobe options, you have likely come to the conclusion that you may be missing one or more items to make sure that the image you create is the right one. For example, perhaps your suit is brown and you are interviewing for a leadership position. Is this the right color suit to portray an image of authority and trust? Is your belt a little tattered? or perhaps you have been training for a marathon since you last put on your suit. Does it fit properly, or is it now too big? Do you know what kind of an image you may send to your interviewer if your suit does not fit you properly? After the next few slides, you will be able to answer these and many other questions about your attire.
  • There is no doubt that as far as interview attire is concerned, price and quality go hand in hand. However, not everyone can afford or should feel as though they need to invest in a Ferragamo tie, or a professional high end suit from Saks, Brooks Brothers, or Lord and Taylors in order to leave an employer with a positive impression and get the job. If your budget allows for interview attire from stores such as these, then by all means you should invest in such high quality formal attire. But, only if it is truly what is called for for your particular level of position and industry. For example, certain conservative, traditional industries such as investment banking or the legal profession will likely expect you to arrive dressed for your interview in formal, high quality attire. However, for the average person interviewing in corporate America, all you really need in order to look professional is at least one decent quality suit in a style and color that is tailored to fit your body type properly. A well tailored suit that fits properly from a more mainstream department store such as Macy’s, Jos A Bank, Men’s Wearhouse, Talbot’s, or Ann Taylor is more than sufficient to create a good impression in most cases. In addition, you can frequently find some great high quality designer suits at deep discounts at outlet malls, consignment stores, and most national chain stores such as Target, Kohl’s, New York and Company, Express, TJ Maxx, and Ross. If you decide to purchase a “gently used” suit at a consignment store, make sure that you have it tailored, cleaned, and professionally pressed. Transition: In order to maximize the impact of your time spent “window shopping” for your interview suit, you will want to first make sure that you are also knowledgeable about the color, style, and fit that is best for you and your particular situation. Let’s start by examining a little bit about the psychological and physical effect that your choice in color may have on the overall outcome of your interview.
  • Color psychologically and physically impacts people…including the person that will be interviewing you. Consequently, you will want to take some to consider wearing the color or colors to your interview that will help you to achieve your desired result. For example, you may want to consider wearing a solid dark grey or navy business suit for an entry or mid-level position. If you wear a black suit you may be perceived as too formal in most industries . If you are interviewing for a higher level professional position, you may want to consider wearing a dark colored suit accented with thin stripes because stripes are usually associated with portraying an image of authority. On the next two slides you will find some helpful insights and guidance regarding the impact that certain colors may have on your interviewer. All information for these next two slides has been borrowed directly from a very useful article entitled “What Colors to Wear to a Job Interview” written by Moshin Manji at Hrinmotion. [NOTE FROM JLF: IN ADDITION TO ADDING ANNIMATION HERE, I SUGGEST ADDRESSING THE COLORS IN A MORE RANDOM ORDER. IT WOULD KEEP PEOPLE MORE ATTUNED – LESS LIKE TO DRIFT OFF DUE TO THE PREDICTABILITY OF THE SEQUENCE.] Black : Represents authority, power, and drama. Black can make you appear unapproachable and overpowering. So avoid it when interviewing, unless in small amounts or as an accent color. White: Symbolizes purity, chastity, and cleanliness. It is a neutral color that goes with everything. It's usually worn in shirts and blouses year round and is a good choice to pair with any interview suit. Blue : Signifies tranquility, authority, trust, and loyalty. It's the best-selling color globally, and the one with the biggest success rate in job interviews. Blue is the ultimate "power color". Brown: Addresses credibility and stability. It's the color of the earth and abundant in nature. Brown creates a neutral environment for open discussion. Beige and tan : Similar to brown, are calming, stress reducing, earthy colors that invite communication. These colors are perceived as nonassertive and passive. Gray: Denotes neutrality and sophistication. After blue, it's the second most popular color to wear to a job interview. If you want to look confident without being overpowering in black, go for gray.
  • Red: Implies heat, danger, power, passion, and strength. The most emotionally intense color, red can stimulate a faster heartbeat and breathing. Use red as an accent color to motivate people to make quick decisions and increase expectations. It can also increase emotions during job interviews, so avoid wearing large amounts of red. Orange : Like red, can stimulate strong emotions. Related to warmth and autumn, individuals who wear orange are perceived as having a strong personality. Bright orange, like bright red, will attract attention and induce intense emotions, so wear moderately in job interviews. Yellow : Promotes a wide range of emotions, from cheer and goodwill to caution, and jealousy. However, people lose their tempers more often in yellow rooms than in rooms of other colors. It is the most difficult color for the eye to absorb, so it can be unbearable if overused. Wear in small doses in job interviews. Green : Indicates nature, success, wealth, and security. A calming, refreshing color, green is the easiest color on the eye and most relaxing. Dark green is masculine, conservative, and implies wealth. People will feel comfortable with you without standing out in a job interview. Purple: Symbolizes royalty, richness, power and sensitivity. It's also the color of passion and love. Purple is often viewed as a "feminine" color, so avoid wearing purple when attending a job interview with a strong gender bias. Pink: Inspires a variety of emotions, from fun and excitement to calm and low energy. Pink is viewed as a feminine color, and, like purple, should be worn with discretion in job interviews. Transition: Regardless of whether your specific interview is formal or more casual, you will want to make sure that you wear a business suit in a style that is flattering to your particular body type, made from a conservative fabric with a minimal weave or color pattern, and has been cut in a conservative traditional style.
  • Many fashion trends come and go, but the traditional business suit has never gone out of style. Avoid suits that are made from acetate and rayon blends, as well as leather, and don’t go digging that old pastel blue 1970’s disco suit out of your closet! Now is not the time to get creative by mixing and matching different pieces from different suits, either, and always make sure that you button your suit for the actual interview. Wool, wool blends, or any number of natural and synthetic blends that mimic wool, are generally the best fabric for all seasons in most areas of the country. Wool is ideal because it is also resistant to wrinkles, elegant, durable, and can be worn comfortably in most types of weather. Worsted wools are lightweight and best for spring and summer. Gabardine wools are heavier for fall. Wool Crepes are lightweight with softer finishes. Flannel wools are heaviest and best worn in winter months. Fabric types - Men – Consider wearing a suit in a conservative color that is made out of wool, a wool blend, or a good quality micro fiber polyester blend. 100% wool is ideal if it will work for the weather and season of your interview. If you have a robust build, you may want to avoid wearing a suit made from Tweed. Avoid wearing a suit made from an acetate/rayon blend of any kind. Women – Consider wearing a suit in a conservative color that is made out of wool, a wool blend, linen, or any number of natural and synthetic blends that mimic wool. Be mindful of the fact that a linen suit will wrinkle easily. Consequently it would not be a very practical suit choice if you have to travel any great distance for your interview.
  • A few things you may also want to consider involve how some of the following styles may positively or negatively impact your particular body type, build, and the image that you want to portray. Shoulder pads - Make you look larger, bulkier, and more authoritative Pleats and darts - Create the illusion that you are bigger than you really are. Also be aware that while pants with pleats may be roomier, they are also currently terribly out of fashion. Low rise pants - While low waists are popular in jeans right now, it is not appropriate to have your hipbone or other inappropriate parts of your body exposed in your professional business suit . Thin vertical lines (pinstripes) - Create the illusion that you are taller and thinner Wide lines - Make your look wider Single vs. Double Breasted Choose a 2 or 3 button single breasted suit. Double breasted suits will look sloppy if they are worn open, and are not considered main stream in the corporate climate. Buttons · 3-button suits will look best on a taller, slimmer person · 2-Button suits will have a slimming effect on a shorter, stockier person Women – The pant suit vs. skirt suit debate Most people agree that the skirted suit expectation is outdated and sexist. Employers are looking to hire someone that is a good “fit” for their organization. So, the best advice regarding this debate is to ask the individual that called you to schedule the interview as to which would be more appropriate to wear according to their dress code, culture, and industry. If for whatever reason this is not an option, then it is a good idea to remember that it is better to be overdressed than under dressed for an interview and you can’t go wrong wearing a skirted suit. This is especially the case if you are interviewing for a position in a conservative traditional industry such as law, banking, or investments. And, it is always fun to go shopping for clothes before you start your next big position. Before you do though, consider going by the work site during times when people are leaving for the day and see what is commonly being worn by the company’s current employees.
  • Fit – Regardless of the amount of money you spend on your suit, making sure that your suit is perfectly tailored in order to fit your body’s specific proportions is one of the most effective things that you can do in order to personify a professional image. When your clothes fit you properly, not only are you more comfortable and confident, but it also creates the perception that you may have invested in purchasing higher end interview attire than you actually did. So make sure to set aside money in your budget for a good tailor, or take advantage of the ones provided by many of the department stores for free or at reduced rates that are available to you if you purchase a suit from them. When you get “fitted” at the tailor, make sure to take any additional accessories such as the shoes that you will be wearing with you. A good tailor will also be knowledgeable about all the appropriate guidelines required to ensure a proper fit. Also keep in mind that it is better to buy a suit that is too big vs. one that may be too small. Remember, clothing that is too short or too snug cannot be lengthened or widened by even the best tailor and they will appear non-flattering and be considered unprofessional attire if you wear them without making the necessary adjustments. On the other hand, a good tailor can take anything in and up if it is too big. Avoid wearing clothing that is too snug, baggy, revealing, short, or long. Women It is not professional to wear anything with a plunging neckline or have a skirt that is too short or has a high slit. Skirts should be knee length or longer (a hemline that is no more than three inches above your knee is considered to be acceptable). If you decide to wear a skirt, it is also a good idea to sit down in front of a mirror and see what your interviewer will be seeing from their perspective in order to make sure that your entire outfit looks professional and respectable. While an outfit that is more revealing may be considered “sexy”, for an interview it is not considered to be professional and will likely send the message that you are hoping to depend upon your looks rather than your skills to get the job. Transition: In the next few slides, we will spend some time diving into some specific attire guidelines for men and women.
  • Pants/jackets/skirts – Wear a well fitting, buttoned, dark, solid-colored, two-piece matched skirt or pant suit for a formal interview. If your interview occasion calls for a more casual look, you can “dress down” your formal business attire by foregoing your suit jacket and making sure that you wear pants made from cotton, wool, or microfiber instead of a skirt. Dark colored pants are usually viewed as more formal than those worn in a lighter color. Don’t forget that in certain areas of the country and in certain industries, business casual may carry with it completely different expectations. So, when in doubt ask first, and overdress for the occasion vs. under dressing for it. For example, in some industries such as IT, business casual attire may mean pressed khaki pants and a professional button down blouse. Blouses • Should be long sleeved, white, ivory, or a lighter shade of blue. For a less formal interview, you can venture out and wear other colors, but try to stick with lighter shades. • Ideal fabric is cotton. Avoid lace, ruffles, and shiny fabrics. Hair/makeup: Hair : Avoid any hairstyles that will cover your face. If you color or highlight your hair make sure that it is in a natural looking color, clean, neatly combed, and worn in a groomed conservative style. You will also want to avoid wearing your hair in any styles that you know have previously given you a headache or may require a lot of maintenance such as an “updo”. If you have long hair, pull it back away from your face so that you can make good eye contact with your interviewer and avoid any nervous temptations to flip, stroke, or twirl your hair. Make-up: Should be simple, understated, in light shades, and make you appear healthy and natural. Avoid using any bright, shiny, or sparkle eye shadow, heavy eyeliner, or lipstick that is overdone or may be too brightly colored. It is also a good idea to make sure that you apply your makeup in a bright room that mirrors the lighting found in most office environments. This will give you a true idea of what impression your makeup will leave with the interviewer.
  • Accessories: Jewelry: Your jewelry should be functional, simple, conservative, match, and subtly compliment your outfit. Your objective should be to ensure that it does not become a distraction or focal point at any time during your interview. As a result, avoid wearing any jewelry that jingles, dangles, or is brightly colored. If you wear earrings, consider wearing just a simple post style in a basic color that matches your attire. Leave your costume jewelry at home. If you wear any facial jewelry, remove it prior to your interview. Make sure that any watches and bracelets you may decide to wear fit properly. Do not wear any “friendship” or “cause-related” bracelets of any kind. Wedding rings are acceptable, but avoid wearing any other rings that may make you appear austentacious. Never wear sunglasses over your eyes or on your head. Scarfs: Are not a part of the traditional conservative attire that should be used for an interview. If they are not conservatively and tastefully done, they can ruin even the best suit and negatively affect the overall impression that you make. For an interview, we recommend leaving these at home, especially for a formal professional interview. Purse/portfolio/briefcase: Consider carrying a small briefcase or professional looking leather or microfiber portfolio instead of carrying a bag or purse. You will also want to make sure that it matches your belt and shoes. A professional portfolio is preferred because it is functional and will enable you to have additional copies of your business cards, resume, and cover letter on hand. It will also make it easy and convenient for you to be able to jot down any important information that you may need after the interview, such as day and time of your next interview and names and spellings of any unexpected people that you may have come into contact with. Finally, if you are gently holding the portfolio across your lap, it also serves as a great way to prevent your hands from taking part in any nervous habits. If you do decide to wear a purse make sure that it is conservative, small, simple, and matches your shoes and belt. Underwear: Underwear should not be visible at any time during the interview. Bras should be white, ivory, or a neutral color, [NOTE FROM JLF – DO WE REALLY MEAN THAT THE BRA SHOULD BE CLOSE TO THE INDIVIDUAL’S SKIN TONE? A WHITE BRA REALLY TENDS TO STAND OUT ON A DARK COMPLECTED INDIVIDUAL.] and should not be visible through your blouse, in your cleavage area, or on your shoulders. So ladies, watch those bra straps (even if they are the same color as your blouse), and realize that it is never appropriate during an interview to wear a dark colored bra with a light colored blouse. You’ll also want to ensure that you do not have a visible panty line, and make sure that your underwear has not cleverly found a way to peer out of the waistline of your pants or skirt. Personal hygiene: Nails – Should be clean, neat, and trimmed. Avoid wearing any brightly colored nail polish or unnaturally long nail tips. These things will only serve as a distraction during the interview, and take the interviewer’s focus away from your skills and what you are saying. Tattoos – If possible, you will want to make sure that they are not visible during your interview. Odor avoidance: When applying any scents such as your perfume or scented lotions, it is important to keep a few things in mind: Many people have allergies to various scents You will likely be interviewing in a very confined space such as a conference room. You may be nervous during your interview. As a result, your body temperature will rise and you may be sweating more than usual. Because of these things, you will want to take every precaution to ensure that you apply enough deodorant in order to avoid any embarrassing body odor and visibly sweaty arm pits, and will also want to make sure that any scents that you do decide to apply are subtle and used in modest amounts. In addition, it is a good idea to make sure that your interview attire is free of any odor resulting from smoking as it can be a big turnoff to many individuals. You should also consider avoiding eating things like onions, garlic, or anything similar that may compromise your breath during your interview. Also, don’t forget to brush your teeth and freshen your breath. Foot/leg wear Shoes: Wear plain polished leather dress shoes or pumps in a dark color (such as black) that matches your suit. They should have no more than a 1–2 inch heel and be in good condition. Never wear open toed or backless shoes, or shoes that are not soled properly and may be slippery or don’t fit properly. Footwear such as stilhettos, platform shoes, and leather knee high boots are not considered to be appropriate attire for any type of interview. Also, make sure that if you do decide to wear heels, that you can walk naturally and comfortably in them without teetering and wobbling. Socks/pantyhose: If you are wearing a skirt, make sure that you wear sheer stockings in a neutral color that matches your skin tone as closely as possible. Even in humid and/or summer weather, if you decide to wear a skirt it is a good idea to wear pantyhose to a formal professional interview. It is also a good idea to have an emergency pair readily accessible in case you get an accidental snag. If you are wearing pants, your socks/stalkings should match each other, be in a dark solid color that matches your pants and shoes, and be at least mid calf length. You will also need to make sure that when you sit down, the interviewer will not be able to see any bare skin. If you are thinking about wearing white sports socks to an interview of any kind, don’t.
  • Pants/jacket: Wear a well fitting, buttoned, dark, solid colored two-piece matched pant suit for a formal interview. If your interview occasion calls for a more casual look, you can “dress down” or relax your look by wearing pressed pants in cotton, wool, or microfiber, and pare them with a collared shirt, a sport coat, silk tie or both. Remember that darker colored pants are usually viewed as more dressy than their counterparts in a lighter color such as khaki. Also remember that in certain areas of the country, and in certain industries, business casual may mean two completely different things. So when in doubt ask. However, never does business casual mean wearing jeans or tennis shoes with white sport socks. When in doubt about what to wear for a casual interview, remember that you can’t go wrong with a tie. Shirt: For a formal interview, a long sleeved clean, pressed, cotton or cotton blend solid colored shirt that is white, or a lighter color of blue is best . For a more casual interview a long-sleeved, cotton or cotton blend, collared button down shirt will do the trick. Never wear a sweatshirt or t-shirt. Hair: A clean, well groomed, conservatively styled, and freshly cut set of hair is critical. If your hair is worn in a longer style, make sure that it is pulled back tastefully from your face. Avoid unnatural and extreme colors in your hair as well as using excessive amounts of styling products in order to create an extreme spiked or “messy” style. In most industries and types of positions, this type of a “creative unkempt look” will not be perceived in a positive manner. If you regularly wear facial hair, make sure that your mustache, beard, side burns, and goatee are neatly trimmed and groomed. If you do not wear any facial hair, then make sure that you arrive for your interview with a clean, freshly shaved face. Do not arrive with a “five o’clock shadow” and make sure that any wounds that may have resulted from any fresh shaving accidents have been properly cleaned, bandaged, and attended to before you arrive.  
  • Accessories: Portfolio/Briefcase: Consider carrying a small briefcase or professional looking leather or microfiber portfolio that is in good condition. It should be in a solid dark conservative color and match your belt and shoes. A professional portfolio is preferred and will have the added benefit of enabling you to have additional copies of your business cards, resume, and cover letter easily accessible. It will also make it easy and convenient for you to be able to jot down any important information that you may need after the interview, such as day and time of your next interview and names and spellings of any unexpected people that you may have come into contact with. Finally, if you are gently holding the portfolio across your lap, it will also serves as a great way to prevent your hands from taking part in any nervous habits during the actual interview. Belt/suspenders: A well fitting leather, solid colored belt that is in good shape and matches the rest of your interview attire such as your shoes and briefcase or portfolio is best. It should also have a simple, small, conservative buckle and not be too wide. Suspenders are perfectly acceptable attire, and may be used in place of a belt as long as they fit properly and do not clash with the rest of your suit. Tie: Your tie should coordinate with your suit and shirt and be no more than 3 1/4 inches in width (2 3/4 to 3 1/2 inches is also acceptable). Consider wearing a conservative silk tie that has a simple stripe or repeating pattern with no more than three different colors throughout it. The length of your tie should reach and not exceed your belt line. If you regularly wear a bow tie, consider parting with it for your interview. Bow ties are not considered to be appropriate attire for traditional conservative business interviews. A simple Windsor knot is a good conservative choice for notching your tie. The background color should be in a neutral color like navy, dark gray or burgundy. Jewelry: Keep your jewelry conservative, functional, and to a minimum. Small, conservative, tastefully done cuff links are acceptable attire. Earrings, necklaces, bracelets, and facial jewelry in most industries is still frowned upon and should be removed prior to your interview. Watches should be conservative, fit appropriately, and not bang or dangle against a desk when you speak. “Friendship” and “cause-related” bracelets should not be worn. Wedding rings are fine. Personal hygiene: After you have had a fresh shower and shaved or groomed your facial hair as applicable, you will want to make sure that you smell good while also making sure that any scents you may decide to apply are also subtle and will not overpower anyone in a small confined space such as a conference room. Odor avoidance: When applying any scents, it is important to keep a few things in mind: 1) Many people have allergies to various scents 2) You will likely be interviewing in a very confined space such as a conference room. 3) You may be nervous during your interview. As a result, your body temperature will rise and you may be sweating more than usual. Because of these things, you will want to take every precaution to ensure that you apply enough deodorant in order to avoid any embarrassing body odor visibly sweaty arm pits, and will also want to make sure that any scents that you do decide to apply are subtle and understated. In addition, it is a good idea to make sure that your interview attire is free of any odor resulting from smoking as it can be a big turnoff to many individuals. So don’t forget to apply deodorant in all the necessary places, and feel free to apply cologne, aftershave, and talc, but use them in very modest amounts. You should also consider avoiding eating things like onions, garlic, or anything similar that may compromise your breath during your interview. Don’t forget to freshly brush your teeth and freshen your breath. However, do not chew gum during your interview. Nails: Make sure that your nails are clean and neatly trimmed Tattoos – If possible, you will want to make sure that they are not visible during your interview. Foot/leg wear: Wear plain leather odor free, freshly polished dress shoes that are in good condition. Black shoes are always a safe color choice, but you may also wear dark brown shoes if you are dressing for a more casual interview and wearing any medium toned attire. Your socks should match each other, and be in a shade that is the same color as your suit or a shade darker. Do not wear any socks with any wild patterns or designs and opt instead for a solid color or design that is subtle and conservative. Your socks should be at least mid calf length so that when you sit down the interviewer is unable to see any bare skin. Even thought they are comfortable, leave the athletic tube socks at home.
  • Exercise Now that you have the knowledge to make sure that you are wearing the right interview attire, we are going to spend some time learning about the very influential role that your body language/nonverbal cues play during an interview. But before we jump in, take a few minutes to review some of the body language portrayed by the individuals in these photos. Pause to review and reflect images….. They tell you quite a lot about the individual, don’t they? What kind of an impression do they leave you with? Transition: Does your body language send the right message to an interviewer during an interview? Do you possess the knowledge and ability needed in order to interpret and properly respond to any nonverbal cues that an interviewer sends you? Your overall communication style will be much more effective during an interview if it is accompanied by the right body language.
  • Your ability to effectively manage your body language will tell an interviewer more about you and your qualifications that what you actually say to them. Despite your strong credentials, and impressive interview attire, poor body language and an inability to notice, interpret, and properly respond to any non verbal cues that may be sent by your interviewer, can severely hamper your chances of securing your ideal job. Don’t forget what you learned earlier in this workshop, 85% of the message that we send to someone is actually the result of our non-verbal signals such as the tone of our voice, posture, gestures, facial expressions, and an abundance of other non verbal messages that our body may voluntarily or involuntarily send to someone. Having the knowledge and ability to control your own non verbal communication style and also interpret and appropriately respond to that used by your interviewer, can be extremely valuable during an interview. For example, you may use this information to change your approach during an interview. Additionally, by the end of your interview, you should also have a pretty good idea regarding what type of an overall impression you may have made, and be able to determine how well your interview may have gone. Most importantly, when you can demonstrate to an employer that you know how to act and respond in social situations, it can serve to reinforce to them the validity of what you have been verbally communicating to them about your impressive credentials and qualifications. During an interview, you will want to use your body language along with your verbal communication skills to try and strike and maintain a balance between making sure that you are not too formal but also not being too casual either. You will want to combine your verbal and non verbal skills together in a way that will enable you to emanate confidence, comfort, and interest, while also avoiding being perceived as arrogant, disinterested, or unsure of yourself. Above all, you will want to listen during your interview with your eyes and ears to make sure that you don’t miss any clear non verbal messages that your interviewer may be trying to send you. Transition: In the next few slides we will review a few of the main things that you can expect to have an experienced interviewer observing and assessing during your interview. But before we do that, take a minute and think about whether or not your current body language during an interview sends the right messages. And are you currently observing, interpreting, and reacting properly to the body language of your interviewers?
  • Hand shake – Use your hand shake as a great way to make your first connection with your interviewer. Let them initiate the hand shake. Your ability to have a firm, dry, warm, clean, comfortable, and consistent handshake in both the beginning and end of the interview is all that is really needed. When you shake someone else’s hand make sure that it does not appear awkward, limp, stiff, or be so powerful that you squeeze or crush the other person’s hand in the process! Also be cautious of holding on to the persons hand for too long, and above all, do not try to engage in any non-traditional, non professional handshakes or embraces. It is a good idea to try and make sure that the "web" between your thumb and index finger meets with the other person’s during the entire hand shaking process (which should be about two to three shakes up and down in all). Facial signals – Have a warm and naturally confident smile throughout your interview at the appropriate times . Try to be aware of making sure that you are not viewed as insincere or artificial by smiling incessantly or laughing at inappropriate times during the interview. Good eye contact connects you with your interviewer and will help you to establish rapport with them. Good eye contact also shows that you are confident, engaged, interested, and a good listener. If the interviewer is talking , make eye contact with them and maintain it until they are done speaking. This will show that you are actively listening to them and also show that you are interested in what they are saying. However, don’t appear as though you are starring “past” the interviewer and don’t get caught appearing as though you are distracted by an object behind them. When you are the one doing the speaking, try to maintain regular eye contact with your interviewer for a time period of about 8-10 seconds at a time, then look away briefly, and then re-establish direct eye contact again. This technique will prevent you from appearing too aggressive and will also help the interviewer feel at ease. Regardless of who is talking, don’t peer over your glasses, frown, cough for no reason, or purse your lips. Instead, try to nod occasionally and slowly in response to your interviewer which will show them that you are paying attention, engaged, and interested in what they are saying. If there are multiple interviewers in the same room, maintain eye contact with the person that is speaking. If you are asked a question, then direct your response first to the individual that asked the question, then glance periodically at each of the interviewers to let them know that your response is addressed to all of them. Finally, you will want to finish your response by making eye contact back with the person that asked the question in the first place. Walk – Have a confident, purposeful walk and make sure that you maintain a distance between you and the interviewer that respects their personal space. Ladies, if you wear heels make sure that you can comfortably and confidently walk in them or don’t wear them. Also, before you get up to walk, ensure that you have made any necessary adjustments that may be required with your attire. For example, don’t get caught straightening your tie, belt, or panty hose one last time, and don’t let them observe you glancing at your own appearance one last time in a mirror or pain of glass as you walk. Finally, let the interviewer lead you as you walk to the actual interview room unless they indicate otherwise. Seating - Wait for the interviewer to direct you to where they would like you to sit. If there are multiple seating options to choose from and the interviewer has been remiss to offer you a place to sit, then it is perfectly acceptable to ask them where they would like you to sit before you sit down. What you want to avoid is making an assumption about where the interviewer intends for you to sit, or worse yet, be caught sitting in the interviewers chair and then have to deal with the awkwardness of them having to ask you to sit somewhere else.
  • Posture – Try to look relaxed and confident. Sit up straight and pull your shoulders comfortably and naturally back in your chair. Once you are completely seated in your chair, orient your body and head towards the interviewer and lean forward slightly (about 10 degrees). Such a posture will make you appear confident, show that you are interested, and enable you to breath more easily. Try to avoid being distracting or appearing as though you are nervous by fidgeting or rocking back and forth in your seat. Do not sit on the edge of your chair, it will make you appear as though you are tense or nervous. Avoid slouching and leaning on the arm of your chair at all costs. Doing so sends the signal to the interviewer that you lack confidence and energy, are unprepared, and/or are disinterested in what they are saying. If there are multiple interviewers in the room at the same time, you will want to be conscious of turning your body away from any of them. Instead, face the middle of the table and try to ensure that your face can be seen and most importantly that your voice can also be heard by all of them. Above all, never turn your back to an interviewer during the interview itself. Hands/Arms – It is best to sit with your hands clasped loosely together and then fold them across your lap. Alternatively, you may opt to hold onto a small professional looking portfolio on your lap during the interview instead. If you decide to use your hands to express yourself or make a point in some way during the interview, do so in a relaxed manner and avoid making any broad and/or highly energetic or profane movements or gestures with them. Never place your hands where the interviewer will be unable to see them (such as in your pockets or under the desk). Doing so suggests a lack of confidence and indicates that you are not relaxed. Never fold your arms across your chest. When you do so, you send a signal that you are defensive, unfriendly or hostile. Do not hold a pen in your hands during your interview. It will only serve as a distraction to the interviewer and represent and become an easy way for you to unconsciously click and fidget with it in an annoying and distracting manner. Finally, be careful not to fall into the easy trap of showing how nervous you are by clenching your fists, tapping your fingers, biting your nails, or playing with your hair. Also, try to avoid putting your hands near your face in any way. When you touch your lips or nose during any conversation these actions may be interpreted to mean that you are not being completely truthful. Legs - Avoid crossing your legs and feet when you sit, and don’t sit with one ankle or foot resting on your other knee. All of these postures can easily become a distraction and an annoyance during an interview, especially if you are continually crossing and uncrossing them or shifting positions due to nervousness. Instead, it is a good idea for women to sit with both of their knees together in a relaxed manner, and men should make sure that you don’t sit with your legs too far apart. It probably goes without saying, but make sure that you avoid shaking, wiggling, or tapping your leg or foot. These are tell-tale signs that you are nervous or unsure of yourself. Personal space - Maintain good personal space between you and your interviewer. If you are too far away and speak in a soft tone, it may be difficult for the interviewer to hear your answers clearly. On the other hand, you do not want to be too close to the interviewer and make them feel uncomfortable because you are invading their personal space. 2-3 feet is usually a comfortable distance to maintain someone’s personal space. Reactions – Make sure that you are conscious of any verbal or non verbal reactions that you may show to anything the interviewer may say or do during the interview process. In many instances, when something odd or unexpected occurs during an interview, the situation is actually very carefully planned and organized and the employer is simply testing you to see how you will react, respond, and deal with the situation. For example, they may have someone interrupt your interview unexpectedly, or have a co-worker enter the room with a problem they need solved and then ask for your opinion on the matter. One of the most classic “staged events” used by interviewers involves them providing you with constructive feedback or criticism about yourself, and then wait to see how you will deal and react to it. So, always be on your toes, and be conscious of how you respond to anything that is said or that may occur during your interview. Your reaction to it is undoubtedly being assessed whether the incident was “staged” or not.
  • Use the knowledge that you have just learned regarding the impact of effectively managing your non verbal cues and apply it towards observing and reacting to those portrayed by your interviewer. The most effective way for you to gain valuable insight into how your interview is really going, is to listen with both your eyes and ears to what your interviewer may be communicating to you through both verbal and non verbal means. Once you acquire this skill, you will undoubtedly impress an interviewer with your ability to be able to properly and professionally identify and react during an interview to any messages that they may be trying to send to you. This skill will also enable you to make any adjustments that may be necessary during your interview. Be cautious of neglecting the verbal aspects of your interview because you are so engaged in trying to observe, interpret, and respond to your interviewer’s body language. You may want to consider practicing and refining your non verbal observational skills with your family and friends prior to your actually interview. Finally, be cautious of appearing as though you are distracted during your interview, and make sure that you don’t read more into your interviewer’s non verbal cues than may actually be there. For example, when a person rubs their nose, this can be an indication that they are being untruthful. However, it may just actually mean that they woke up with a bad cold today and might be appreciative of your empathy instead. On the other hand, there are some very obvious body signals that should never be misinterpreted. For example, if your interviewer stands up from their desk and faces the door, this is an indication that the interview is over. Respect their time and don’t keep talking. If they are looking at their watch, they are likely bored, you are rambling, or they are short on time. Regardless of the reason, it is a signal to you to be quiet. So, stop talking. And finally, if their eye contact is poor, or their smile seems forced it probably is. These are sure signals that you need to find a way to get them engaged with you again and find a way to make a connection.
  • The true success of any interview begins the second you enter the employer’s property A high percentage of what we communicate is done nonverbally Each company, industry, geographic area of the country, and interviewer has its own unique personality, style, preferences, culture, and environment. As a result, no two interview situations that you encounter should ever be treated exactly the same Creating a first impression is mostly a matter of common sense.  Pay attention to your appearance, your body language and manners, and react appropriately to the nonverbal cues being sent to you by your interviewer. Mastering these things will assist you in your attempt to leave a favorable impression with your interviewer and convince them that you are the right individual to be hired to fill their job vacancy.

Transcript

  • 1. Impression Management Limited Use Agreement Unauthorized reproduction, sale, or publication of any part of this presentation without the prior express written permission of Hiring for Hope Inc. is strictly prohibited.
  • 2. Introduction
    • A high percentage of what we communicate is done non verbally
    • Skills, education, and experience are critical
    • Overall appearance and verbal communication style are also important
  • 3. Workshop Overview
    • Definition of impression management
    • Company and interviewer considerations
    • General attire basics
    • Gender specific interview attire guidelines
    • Body language/nonverbal communication
  • 4. What is Impression Management?
    • Being conscious of and managing:
    • What you say
    • How you say it (tone)
    • Your body language/ nonverbal communication
    • How you dress and groom yourself
    • Your actions and reactions
  • 5. Do Appearances Matter?
  • 6.
    • You will command respect and create your desired impression and outcome by dressing, acting, and speaking appropriately for your surroundings
    • Every company and industry is unique
    • Every interview and interviewer is unique
    • Information is power
    • Ensure that the impression you are trying to make is the right impression
    Hiringforhope.org Company and Interviewer Considerations
  • 7.
    • Do your due diligence
    • Consider and jot down what you may already know
    • Research the company and the interviewers before you call a company representative
    • Contact a company representative if you still can’t find the answers to your question(s)
    Hiringforhope.org Company and Interviewer Considerations
  • 8. General Attire Basics
    • “ Dressing for success” does not have to be expensive
    • What you wear and how you wear it are critical
    • We are all unique individuals with different body types
    • Selecting the right attire will boost your self confidence and your overall presentation.
  • 9. General Attire Basics
    • Interview Attire:
      • Should not distract the interviewer from being able to focus on you
      • Should play an “ancillary and “complimentary” role
      • It is better to overdress than under dress
      • Rehearse your attire a few days before the interview.
      • Right before the interview perform a full mirror check of the front, back, and side views
  • 10. General Attire Basics
    • Interview Attire:
    • Should be simple, conservative, and professional
    • Should be consistent with the brand and image that you have created
    • Should be neat, clean, ironed/pressed, stain- free and in good condition.
    • Should communicate that you are mature, organized, and a suitable representative for the company
  • 11. What does your current attire say about you?
    • Dressing professionally for an interview will boost your self- confidence
    • Increased self-confidence will help you present yourself well and leave a favorable impression
    • Does your interview attire portray the image that the company is looking for?
  • 12. General Attire Basics - Price/Quality
    • Do some window shopping and make sure that your interview attire is the right color, style, and fit for your body type
    • Price and quality go hand in hand
    • You don’t need to spend a fortune to look great
    • Invest in a good tailor
  • 13. General Attire Basics – Color/Pattern Authority Power Drama Purity Chastity Cleanliness Tranquility Trust Loyalty Credibility Stability Neutrality Calming Stress Reducing Passive Neutrality Sophistication Confidence
  • 14. General Attire Basics – Color/Pattern Danger Power Passion Emotion Strength Strong Personality Cheer Caution Jealousy Success Wealth Security Royalty Power Sensitivity Fun Calm Low Energy
  • 15. General Basics – Fabric/Style for Suits
    • Don’t mix and match pieces from different suit sets
    • Avoid fashion trends
    • Always button your suit
    • Acceptable fabric types:
      • Wool
      • Wool blends
      • Natural/synthetic blends that mimic wool
  • 16. General Basics – Fabric/Style
    • Style
      • Shoulder pads
      • Pleats/darts
      • Low rise pants
      • Lines/pinstripes
      • Single vs. double breasted
      • How many buttons?
      • Pants vs. skirt suit for women
  • 17. General Basics – Fit
    • A well tailored suit looks expensive, and makes you feel more confident
    • A good tailor is knowledgeable about professional fit guidelines
    • Avoid cuts that are too snug or short
    • Avoid clothing that is too revealing
    • Skirts – hemline should be no more than three inches above the knee
  • 18.
    • Pants/jacket/shirt
    • Blouse
    • Hair/makeup
    Hiringforhope.org Interview Attire - Women
  • 19.
    • Accessories
    • Underwear
    • Personal hygiene
    • Foot/leg wear
    Hiringforhope.org Interview Attire - Women
  • 20.
    • Pants/jacket
    • Shirts
    • Hair
    Hiringforhope.org Interview Attire - Men
  • 21.
    • Accessories
    • Personal hygiene
    • Foot/leg wear
    Hiringforhope.org Interview Attire - Men
  • 22. Hiringforhope.org Body Language/Nonverbal Communication Body Language/Nonverbal Communication
  • 23.
    • 85% of what we communicate is through nonverbal means
    • Effective communicators master the fine art of listening with their eyes and ears
    • Listen and observe your interviewer for both verbal and nonverbal signals
    • Use your body language to strike a balance between too formal and too casual
    Hiringforhope.org Body Language/Nonverbal Communication tips
  • 24.
    • Hand shake
    • Facial signals
    • Walk
    • Seating
    Hiringforhope.org Body Language/Non-Verbal Communication tips
  • 25.
    • Posture
    • Hands/arms
    • Legs
    • Personal space
    • Reactions
    Hiringforhope.org Body Language/Non-Verbal Communication tips
  • 26.
    • Listen with your eyes and ears
    • React to verbal and nonverbal communication
    • Observe your interviewer’s nonverbal signals
    • Don’t appear distracted
    • Don’t read more into your interviewer’s nonverbal signals than is really there
    Hiringforhope.org Interviewers Message
  • 27.
    • The true success of any interview begins the second you enter the employer’s property
    • A high percentage of what we communicate is done nonverbally
    • Each company, industry, geographic area of the country, and interviewer has its own unique personality, style, preferences, culture, and environment.
    • As a result, no two interview situations that you encounter should ever be treated exactly the same
    Hiringforhope.org Summary
  • 28.
    • Do your due diligence before you arrive for your interview
    • Price and quality go hand in hand but you don’t need to drop a small fortune to look professional
    • Invest in a good tailor
    • The color, fabric/style, and fit of your attire is critical
    • Your ability to effectively manage your body language and react to the nonverbal signals given by your interviewer says more than what you say
    Hiringforhope.org Summary
  • 29.
    • True or False ? It is ok to be rude to the valet and the front desk receptionist. The impression that you leave with them doesn’t matter.
    • True or False ? The color, style/fabric, and fit of your interview suit are the only things that matter about your appearance?
    • True or False ? The only nonverbal skill you need to master is having the ability to manage your own body language?
    • True or False? 85% of what we communicate during an interview is done via the nonverbal signals we send our interviewer?
    • True or False ? Observing and reacting appropriately to your interviewer’s nonverbal signals is not important.
    Hiringforhope.org Test Your Knowledge
  • 30.
    • What Colors To Wear To A Job Interview By Moshin Manji
    • Virginia Tech Career Services Website - http://www.career.vt.edu/
    • Listen With Your Eyes: Tips for Understanding Nonverbal Communication - By Susan M. Heathfield
    • Interview Body Language that Sends the Right Message – www. Best-job-interview.com
    • Hartley, Gregory and Kovinch, Maryann. I Can Read you Like a Book. Franklin Lakes, NJ: Career Press, 2007.
    • Reference Guide for Interview Dress Etiquette. Revision 3.1 (November 2005). Created by www.ExecStyle.com
    Hiringforhope.org Source Page