Training to be a nurse
To become a nurse you must hold a degree in pre-registration nursing. This leads to registration
wi...
Additionally, you may have the opportunity to learn alongside other students in other healthcare
professions such as:
midw...
1. Completing a Bachelor’s Degree in Nursing (BSN),
2. Completing an Associate Degree in Nursing (ADN), or
3. Completing a...
Addictions Nursing
Ambulatory Care Nursing
Cardiac Catheterization Lab Nurse
Certified Nurse Assistant (CNA)
Certified Nur...
If you're thinking about becoming a nurse seriously you might also want to try volunteering at a
hospital before or during...
How to choose your nursing school
When choosing where you will be taking your course and deciding what program you are goi...
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Advantages of being a nurse practitioner

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for people who really are interested in being a nurse this is the best info that you will need in becoming a nurse depending on the stipulated time this will surely be of great help to you
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Advantages of being a nurse practitioner

  1. 1. Training to be a nurse To become a nurse you must hold a degree in pre-registration nursing. This leads to registration with the Nursing and Midwifery Council (NMC), enabling you to practice. The nursing diploma in higher education has been phased out. Branches of nursing Pre-registration nursing degrees are offered in four branches: adult children (paediatric) learning disability mental health. You will need to decide which of the four branches of nursing you wish to train for, before applying for a programme. However, a small number of universities offer you the flexibility to choose your branch after having started the course. Some universities are approved to run dual branch pre-registration courses leading to registration in two branches of nursing. For example adult and mental health or adult and children's. Some courses also offer the chance to combine social work with learning disability or children's nursing. However, you are strongly recommended to contact the universities that you are considering before making your application. Pre-registration programmes Degree programmes comprise 50% theory and 50% practice. Your time will be split between the university and practical placements. At university, you will learn about the safe and effective delivery of nursing care through a variety of teaching and learning methods, including lectures, seminars, presentations and tutorials. This will include practising on lifelike models which provides a safe way in which you can develop, practise and gain confidence in your nursing skills. You will study four main areas of competence: professional values communication and interpersonal skills nursing practice and decision making leadership, management and team working.
  2. 2. Additionally, you may have the opportunity to learn alongside other students in other healthcare professions such as: midwifery social work pharmacy occupational therapy. Part-time study Part-time pre-registration nursing programmes are provided by some universities and normally last for five or six years. They are available to staff working in the NHS - usually as an assistant or an associate practitioner with qualifications up to NVQ level 3 (or equivalent). You'd be employed by the NHS, which would provide support in terms of time off to attend on a part-time basis. Clinical placements The clinical placements that you experience will be related to the branch of nursing that you have chosen. So if you choose to go into mental health nursing, the placements will focus mainly on patients with mental health problems in hospital and community settings. However, some aspects of training are common to all branches of nursing. After your pre-registration programme Once you've successfully completed your degree and registered with the NMC you can apply for nursing posts. With some experience, you can develop your career further, which may mean further study and /training. Healthcare is constantly developing, technology improving, and the needs of the population changing. Once qualified, it is necessary to keep yourself up to date with health care issues and practice. This will be required by the NMC, and encouraged by your employer. How to Become a Nurse – Qualifications Needed How to Become a Nurse: There are three ways to qualify as a Registered Nurse and apply for entry level nursing positions. They are as follows:
  3. 3. 1. Completing a Bachelor’s Degree in Nursing (BSN), 2. Completing an Associate Degree in Nursing (ADN), or 3. Completing a Diploma Program in a hospital. Registered Nursing Programs: All registered nursing programs include classroom instruction and practical experience in hospitals or clinics. Typical subjects studied by student nurses include: Chemistry, Nutrition, Psychology, Anatomy, Physiology, Microbiology, Behavioral Sciences, and Nursing. During the practical block of a nurse’s education, student nurses are supervised in a hospital department, and usually rotate around such departments as pediatrics, psychiatry, maternity, and surgery. Nurses with an Associate Degree can later choose to enter a Bachelor’s program, this will allow for more career and educational opportunities in the future. Bachelor’s of Science Degrees in Nursing programs are also available for individuals with a primary degree in another field. Some universities offer transfer credits to students who may have previously completed some of the modules in another science degree program. Transfer credits are at the discretion of each university. Qualifying: In the past, most nurses qualified by completing diploma programs. Due to advances in Nursing practices, today most Nurses qualify by completing an associate degree or bachelor degree program. Once a student nurse obtains a degree or diploma, he/she must then obtain a nursing license by completing a national licensing examination, known as the NCLEXRN. NCLEX-RN: This test is a computer-based test, designed to measure the skills and knowledge of potential nurses. This test can ask between 75 and 265 questions depending on the student nurses knowledge. The more questions she gets right the quicker she will move through the levels. If a question is answered wrong, the student nurse will stay at that level until she displays that they have a enough knowledge to move onto the next level, or the time runs out. Student Nurses are allowed six hours to take the test. It will not take long if she is very knowledgeable on the subject matter. Some state laws have previously dictated that to work in a state other than where the Nurse qualified in, she would have to sit an additional license examination. Today many states have entered into an agreement known as The Nurse Licensure Compact Agreement. This agreement allows nurses who are licensed by one member state to practice in another member state without obtaining any additional license. Preview different types of positions: Search and review the different types of Nursing Jobs & Health Care Jobs posted on our jobsite, for an idea of the duties and responsibilities, education/skills required, salary and benefits associated with Health Care related, Medical & Nursing jobs in USA
  4. 4. Addictions Nursing Ambulatory Care Nursing Cardiac Catheterization Lab Nurse Certified Nurse Assistant (CNA) Certified Nurse Midwife Certified Registered Nurse Anesthetist Critical Care Nurse Diabetes Management Nurse Emergency / Trauma Nurse Flight / Transport Nurse Forensic Nursing Genetics Nursing Geriatric Nurse Practitioner HIV / AIDS Nurse Holistic Nursing Home Healthcare Nurse Hospice and Palliative Care Nurse Intellectual and Developmental Disabilities Nurse Legal Nurse Consultant Licensed Practical Nurse (LPN) Licensed Vocational Nurse (LVN) Medical Assistant Medical Surgical Nurse Neonatal Nurse (NICU) Nurse Anesthetist (CRNA) Nurse Practitioner Nursing Assistant Nursing Informatics Occupational Health Nurse Oncology Nurse Parish Nurse Pediatric Nurse Practitioner PeriAnesthesia Nursing PeriOperative Nursing Psychiatric Mental Health Nurse Public Health Nurse Radiology Nurse (CRN) Registered Nurse (RN) Rehabilitation Nurse School Nurse Practitioner Transplant Nursing Travel Nursing Wound Ostomy Continence Nursing (WOCN) How to Become a Nurse Why do you want to become a nurse? Asking yourself why you want to become a nurse is the most important step towards entering a nursing career in which commitment and passion are key ingredients. Make sure you posses the right motives and determination to become a nurse, as it is not a career path to be taken lightly. Having said all that, don't give up on pursuing a career in nursing if it is truly your dream, the rewards for succeeding can be very high. At the moment there is a constant need for qualified and competent nurses, however the number of courses offered are limited and getting into a nursing program can be very difficult. Keeping that in mind it usually helps to have taken and excelled in your high school science courses, chemistry and biology especially.
  5. 5. If you're thinking about becoming a nurse seriously you might also want to try volunteering at a hospital before or during any coursework you might undertake. This, while not giving you the full nursing experience, will give you first hand experience on what it means to work in a hospital and the duties you might be required to perform should you become a full-time nurse. If you feel volunteering isn't showing you the big picture or you need to find a job you might want to try looking for a job as a hospital aide. A hospital aide assists the hospital staff with basic patient care such as feeding and walking under the supervision of registered or licensed nurses. This job, unlike volunteering, would give you experience with patient care and the possibility to work with nurses while performing your duties. Decide what type of education you wish to pursue If you still feel strongly about becoming a nurse after having had some direct experience your next step is to evaluate and decide what type of nurse you wish to become and along with that what type of education you wish to pursue. There are two main types of nurses: Licensed Practical Nurse and Registered Nurse. Licensed Practical Nurse A LPN usually works under the supervision of a registered nurse but has greater responsibilities compared to a hospital or nurse aide. These responsibilities vary from state to state and go from recording patients vital signs to administering prescribed medication. Training programs to become LPN are provided by vocational schools and community colleges and usually take one year to complete. Becoming and working as a LPN is a great way to start your career and in many cases it leads up to becoming a fully Registered Nurse. Registered Nurse Registered nurses are fully qualified nurses who operate under no or little supervision and have the greatest responsibilities when it comes to their duties. They administer medication, operate medical equipment and help with performing the necessary medical tests on a patient. There are ways two ways of becoming a RN, each with it's own particular education route. The first way of becoming a RN is obtaining an Associates degree by completing a 2 year nursing course (ADN). The second, and longer, way is by acquiring a Bachelor degree after having completed a 4 year nursing course (BSN). The difference in duties between the two types of training is minimal compared to a LPN as both degrees will allow you to become a RN but hospitals do look into your education when hiring and RNs with a bachelor degree will be usually paid better. A second advantage to choosing a BSN is the possibility of continuing your education with a Master's Degree (MSN), a PHD or a Doctor of Nursing Practice (DNP). Obtaining these degrees will allow for even further specialization and your salary and hiring possibilities will increase accordingly.
  6. 6. How to choose your nursing school When choosing where you will be taking your course and deciding what program you are going to select most basic college choosing tips are valid (talk to other students or graduates, check their website and gather any info you can on the institution etc... ) but, especially if you're looking to become a RN or a LPN, it is vital you make sure the program is accredited by the National League for Nursing Accrediting Commission. By choosing such a program you should be guaranteed that you will be able to take the NCLEX-RN or the NCLEX-PN which are the examinations that are required to become a Registered Nurse or a Licensed Practical Nurse respectively. Now that you have completed your education and taken your exams you can start working and benefitting from all your hard work. Good luck in your nursing career. Article Source: http://EzineArticles.com/7614352

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