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Unparalleled research brings the past alive in "Famine Ghost: Genocide of the Irish," by Jack O'Keefe... famineghost.com

Unparalleled research brings the past alive in "Famine Ghost: Genocide of the Irish," by Jack O'Keefe... famineghost.com

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  • “ The fearful system of wholesale ejectment, of which we daily hear, and which we daily behold, is a mockery of the eternal laws of God-- a flagrant outrage on the principles of nature . Whole districts are cleared. Not a roof-tree is to be seen where the happy cottage of the labourer or the snug homestead of the farmer at no distant day cheered the landscape." Illustrated London News , December 16 , 1848 From Steve Taylor Website Views of the Famine http://adminstaff.vassar.edu/sttaylor/FAMINE/
  • “ . . . I came to a sharp turn in the road, in view of that for which we sought, and of which I send you a sketch, namely, the packing and making ready of, I may say, an entire village-- for there were not more than half-a-dozen houses on the spot, and all their former inmates were preparing to leave. Immediately that my rev. friend was recognised, the people gathered about him in the most affectionate manner. . . He stood for awhile surrounded by the old and the young, the strong and the infirm, on bended knees, and he turned his moistened eyes towards heaven, and asked the blessing of the Almighty upon the wanderers during their long and weary journey." Illustrated London News, May 10 , 1851
  • 'The Discovery of the Potato Blight' by Daniel McDonald c. 1852. Potatoes often appeared to be perfectly sound when lifted from the ground but were later found to have rotted in store, with disastrous consequences to the people so dependent on them. Fr Theobald Mathew wrote in August 1846 of having seen 'one wide waste of putrifying vegetation' between Cork and Dublin, and that 'in many places the wretched people were seated on the fences of their decaying gardens, wringing their hands and wailing bitterly [at] the destruction that had left them foodless'.
  •    “ Searching for potatoes is one of the occupations of those who cannot obtain out-door relief. It is gleaning in a potato-field-- and how few are left after the potatoes are dug, must be known to every one who has ever seen the field cleared. What the people were digging and hunting for, like dogs after truffles, I could not imagine, till I went into the field, and then I found them patiently turning over the whole ground, in the hopes of finding the few potatoes the owner might have overlooked. Gleaning in a potato-field seems something like shearing hogs, but it is the only means by which the gleaners could hope to get a meal." Illustrated London News, Dec. 22, 1849                         “ Searching for potatoes is one of the occupations of those who cannot obtain out-door relief. It is gleaning in a potato-field-- and how few are left after the potatoes are dug, must be known to every one who has ever seen the field cleared. What the people were digging and hunting for, like dogs after truffles, I could not imagine, till I went into the field, and then I found them patiently turning over the whole ground, in the hopes of finding the few potatoes the owner might have overlooked. Gleaning in a potato-field seems something like shearing hogs, but it is the only means by which the gleaners could hope to get a meal." Illustrated London News, Dec. 22, 1849
  • "The wretched mendicant, with her idiot boy, is an object of deep commiseration. The poorest wretch to whom his mother appeals in his behalf would be almost afraid, in the sight of Heaven, to refuse to divide a handful of meal or potatoes with him. From morning till night his eternal 'pal, la! pal la!' is heard, unless when he stops the cravings of hunger with the offal that are thrown to him by the hand of poverty-stricken charity." Illustrated London News, August 12, 1843. From Steve Taylor’s website Views of the Famine http://adminstaff.vassar.edu/sttaylor/FAMINE/
  •   "A specimen of the in-door horrors of Scull may be seen in the annexed sketch of the hut of a poor man named Mullins, who lay dying in a corner upon a heap of straw, supplied by the Relief Committee, whilst his three wretched children crouched over a few embers of turf, as if to raise the last remaining spark of life. This poor man, it appears, had buried his wife some five days previously, and was, in all probability, on the eve of joining her, when he was found out by the untiring efforts of the Vicar, who, for a few short days, saved him from that which no kindness could ultimately avert. The Vicar himself died not long after. Our Artist assures us that the dimensions of the hut do not exceed ten feet square; adding that, to make the sketch, he was compelled to stand up to his ankles in the dirt and filth upon the floor. " Illustrated London News, February 20 , 1847 . From Steve Taylor’s Website Views of the Famine http://adminstaff.vassar.edu/sttaylor/FAMINE/
  • "The first Sketch is taken on the road, at Cahera, of a famished boy and girl turning up the ground to seek for a potato to appease their hunger. 'Not far from the spot where I made this sketch,' says Mr. Mahoney, 'and less than fifty perches from the high road, is another of the many sepulchres above ground, where six dead bodies had lain for twelve days, without the least chance of interment, owing to their being so far from the town.'" Illustrated London News , February 20, 1847 . From Steve Taylor’s Website Views of the Famine http://adminstaff.vassar.edu/sttaylor/FAMINE/
  • Quaker Tapestry Scheme© Visits were made to the areas in most need, mainly in the west, where the potato had become virtually the only food of most of the population. Food was distributed to the needy, whatever their religion, with no strings attached. Soup kitchens were set up in towns and huge quantities were provided – you will see a small plaque in the wall of Monkstown Meeting House where it was dispensed. In today's money the assistance given was about euro14m, much of which came from Friends in other countries, and Friends also expended a huge amount of their own time and energy. At that time there were about 3,000 Friends in Ireland out of a population of 8.5m. During and after the famine large quantities of seeds for other food crops were distributed and grants were made to fishermen to repair and replace boats and nets. Agricultural training was also provided, and a model farm was established in Co. Galway. Having decided that he should do what he could to give people the means of avoiding famine in the future, James Ellis, a Quaker businessman from Bradford, retired early in 1849 and moved to Letterfrack in Co. Galway, where he and his wife Mary used their resources to provide employment and training to scores of men and give schooling to their children. Some of the buildings still exist, and when you visit Letterfrack you will still find much evidence of what they did there. The Religious Society of Friends (Quakers) in Ireland “ The Quaker Tapestry is a modern embroidery of 77 fascinating panels. Made by 4,000 men, women, and children, this international community project explores three centuries of social history. The Exhibition Centre in Kendal, Cumbria UK is open to the public from early spring to late autumn each year. For more information, visit the website www.quaker-tapestry.co.uk.”
  •   The Irish Famine, 1850 (oil on canvas) by George Frederic Watts (1817-1904) © Trustees of the Watts Gallery, Compton, Surrey, UK/ The Bridgeman Art Library
  • "Insurrection and rebellion would only lead to an aggravation of misery, the contemplation of which is sufficiently appalling to induce the right minded and humane to shrink from the consequences of recommending, even in the remotest contingency, any appeal to arms, unless, indeed, it were to invite the extirpation of the race as the only remedy against the destitution of which they are the unhappy victims." Pictorial Times, August 22, 1846 From Steve Taylor’s Website Views of the Famine http://adminstaff.vassar.edu/sttaylor/FAMINE/
  • during the famine years there was plenty of food in Ireland enough to feed double its population. Yes the potato failed but all other crops thrived. Under the system at the time Irish food was exported mainly to English markets but from they're found its way to many parts of the whereas a land that had so much food to export .In normal countries it was usual to export food only after its population was fed. This was not the case in Ireland; during the period her food was taken away against the wishes of her people, usually at gunpoint and escorted to the ports under military guard. It was then carried away on ships leaving misery and starvation behind. ring the famine years there was plenty of food in Ireland enough to blew its population. Yes the system at the time Irish food was exported mainly to English markets but from they're found its way to many parts of the world. It puzzled many a land that had so much foo “ The potato failed from blight but the country was full of food, which was taken away from those who grew it, to be consumed by the expanding workforce of the industrial boom in England or by its army overseas.” http://www.wolfetonesofficialsite.com/famine.htm d to export .In normal countries it was usual to export food only after its population was fed. This was not the case in Ireland; during the ion behind. “ The potato failed from blight but the country was full of food, which was taken away from those who grew it, to be consumed by the expanding workforce of the industrial boom in England or by its army overseas.” http://www.wolfetonesofficialsite.com/famine.htm
  • "The ravages of disease at Skibbereen continue to be but too sadly confirmed. From a drawing made on the spot, we give a sketch of a scene of no unusual occurrence, as appears from the following extract of a letter from Skibbereen:--'Deaths here are daily increasing. Dr. Donovan and I are just this moment after returning from the village of South Reen, where we had to bury a body ourselves that was eleven days dead; and where do you think? In a kitchen garden. We had to dig the ground, or rather the hole, ourselves; no one would come near us, the smell was so intolerable. We are half dead from the work lately imposed on us.'" From Steve Taylor’s Website Views of the Famine http://adminstaff.vassar.edu/sttaylor/FAMINE/
  • A contemporary lithograph drawn by A. S. G. Stopford . From Steve Taylor’s Website Views of the Famine http://adminstaff.vassar.edu/sttaylor/FAMINE/
  • “ I started from Cork for Skibbereen and saw little until we came to Clonakilty, where . . . the horrors of the poverty became visible, in the vast number of famished poor, who flocked around the coach to beg alms: amongst them was a woman carrying in her arms the corpse of a fine child, and making the most distressing appeal to the passengers for aid to enable her to purchase a coffin and bury her dear little baby. This horrible spectacle induced me to make some inquiry about her, when I learned from the people of the hotel that each day brings dozens of such applicants into the town.” James Mahony. Illustrated London News, February 13, 1847 . From Steve Taylor’s website Views of the Famine http://adminstaff.vassar.edu/sttaylor/FAMINE/  
  • The painting from the late 19th century ( Evicted by Lady Butler, 1890, University College, Dublin) how Irish art had changed since the Famine years Evicted constitutes a new direction in Irish rural art. Portraying the after-effects of the destruction of the peasant woman's cabin, the beauty of the landscape (the Wicklow hills) complements the plight of the inhabitants. 'She too is a victim of historic exploitation, with no rights over the land she inhabits.'
  • ERIN-In forty years I have lost, through the operation of no natural law, more than Three Millions of my Sons and Daughters, and they, the Young and the Strong, leaving behind the Old and Inform to weep and die. Where is this to end? Source: Supplement, Weekly Freeman, 2 July 1881.  

Famine ghost ppt2 Famine ghost ppt2 Presentation Transcript

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  • According to a modern scholar, Norita Fleming, "it is commonly accepted that from Ireland to Grosse Ile, in the ocean graveyard, bodies could form a continuous chain of burial crosses."
  • “ The fearful system of wholesale ejectment, of which we daily hear, and which we daily behold, is a mockery of the eternal laws of God-- a flagrant outrage on the principles of nature . Whole districts are cleared. Not a roof-tree is to be seen where the happy cottage of the labourer or the snug homestead of the farmer at no distant day cheered the landscape." Illustrated London News , December 16 , 1848 From Steve Taylor Website Views of the Famine http://adminstaff.vassar.edu/sttaylor/FAMINE/ View slide
  • “ . . . I came to a sharp turn in the road, in view of that for which we sought, and of which I send you a sketch, namely, the packing and making ready of, I may say, an entire village-- for there were not more than half-a-dozen houses on the spot, and all their former inmates were preparing to leave. Immediately that my rev. friend was recognised, the people gathered about him in the most affectionate manner. . . He stood for awhile surrounded by the old and the young, the strong and the infirm, on bended knees, and he turned his moistened eyes towards heaven, and asked the blessing of the Almighty upon the wanderers during their long and weary journey." Illustrated London News, May 10 , 1851 View slide
  • 'The Discovery of the Potato Blight' by Daniel McDonald c. 1852.Potatoes often appeared to be perfectly sound when lifted from the ground but were later found to have rotted in store, with disastrous consequences to the people so dependent on them. Fr Theobald Mathew wrote in August 1846 of having seen 'one wide waste of putrifying vegetation' between Cork and Dublin, and that 'in many places the wretched people were seated on the fences of their decaying gardens, wringing their hands and wailing bitterly [at] the destruction that had left them foodless'.
  • Last rites administered to a dying man aboard a coffin ship at Grosse Ile Sligo Heritage http://www.sligoheritage.com/archpomano.htm
  •   “ Searching for potatoes is one of the occupations of those who cannot obtain out-door relief. It is gleaning in a potato-field-- and how few are left after the potatoes are dug, must be known to every one who has ever seen the field cleared. What the people were digging and hunting for, like dogs after truffles, I could not imagine, till I went into the field, and then I found them patiently turning over the whole ground, in the hopes of finding the few potatoes the owner might have overlooked. Gleaning in a potato-field seems something like shearing hogs, but it is the only means by which the gleaners could hope to get a meal." Illustrated London News, Dec. 22, 1849
  • "The wretched mendicant, with her idiot boy, is an object of deep commiseration. The poorest wretch to whom his mother appeals in his behalf would be almost afraid, in the sight of Heaven, to refuse to divide a handful of meal or potatoes with him. From morning till night his eternal 'pal, la! pal la!' is heard, unless when he stops the cravings of hunger with the offal that are thrown to him by the hand of poverty-stricken charity." Illustrated London News, August 12, 1843. From Steve Taylor’s website Views of the Famine http://adminstaff.vassar.edu/sttaylor/FAMINE/
  •   "A specimen of the in-door horrors of Scull may be seen in the annexed sketch of the hut of a poor man named Mullins, who lay dying in a corner upon a heap of straw, supplied by the Relief Committee, whilst his three wretched children crouched over a few embers of turf, as if to raise the last remaining spark of life. This poor man, it appears, had buried his wife some five days previously, and was, in all probability, on the eve of joining her, when he was found out by the untiring efforts of the Vicar, who, for a few short days, saved him from that which no kindness could ultimately avert. The Vicar himself died not long after. Our Artist assures us that the dimensions of the hut do not exceed ten feet square; adding that, to make the sketch, he was compelled to stand up to his ankles in the dirt and filth upon the floor. " Illustrated London News, February 20 , 1847 . From Steve Taylor’s Website Views of the Famine http://adminstaff.vassar.edu/sttaylor/FAMINE/
  • "The first Sketch is taken on the road, at Cahera, of a famished boy and girl turning up the ground to seek for a potato to appease their hunger. 'Not far from the spot where I made this sketch,' says Mr. Mahoney, 'and less than fifty perches from the high road, is another of the many sepulchres above ground, where six dead bodies had lain for twelve days, without the least chance of interment, owing to their being so far from the town.'" Illustrated London News , February 20, 1847 . From Steve Taylor’s Website Views of the Famine http://adminstaff.vassar.edu/sttaylor/FAMINE/
  • Quaker Tapestry Scheme© Visits were made to the areas in most need, mainly in the west, where the potato had become virtually the only food of most of the population. Food was distributed to the needy, whatever their religion, with no strings attached. Soup kitchens were set up in towns and huge quantities were provided – you will see a small plaque in the wall of Monkstown Meeting House where it was dispensed. In today's money the assistance given was about euro14m, much of which came from Friends in other countries, and Friends also expended a huge amount of their own time and energy. At that time there were about 3,000 Friends in Ireland out of a population of 8.5m. During and after the famine large quantities of seeds for other food crops were distributed and grants were made to fishermen to repair and replace boats and nets. Agricultural training was also provided, and a model farm was established in Co. Galway. Having decided that he should do what he could to give people the means of avoiding famine in the future, James Ellis, a Quaker businessman from Bradford, retired early in 1849 and moved to Letterfrack in Co. Galway, where he and his wife Mary used their resources to provide employment and training to scores of men and give schooling to their children. Some of the buildings still exist, and when you visit Letterfrack you will still find much evidence of what they did there. The Religious Society of Friends (Quakers) in Ireland “ The Quaker Tapestry is a modern embroidery of 77 fascinating panels. Made by 4,000 men, women, and children, this international community project explores three centuries of social history. The Exhibition Centre in Kendal, Cumbria UK is open to the public from early spring to late autumn each year. For more information, visit the website www.quaker-tapestry.co.uk.”
  •     The Irish Famine, 1850 (oil on canvas) by George Frederic Watts (1817-1904) © Trustees of the Watts Gallery, Compton, Surrey, UK/ The Bridgeman Art Library
  • "The Sketch of a Woman and Children represents Bridget O’Donnell. Her story is briefly this: -- ‘ . . .we were put out last November; we owed some rent. I was at this time lying in fever . . . they commenced knocking down the house, and had half of it knocked down when two neighbours, women, Nell Spellesley and Kate How, carried me out . . . I was carried into a cabin, and lay there for eight days, when I had the creature (the child) born dead. I lay for three weeks after that. The whole of my family got the fever, and one boy thirteen years old died with want and with hunger while we were lying sick.'" Illustrated London News, December 22, 1849 From Steve Taylor’s Website Views of the Famine http://adminstaff.vassar.edu/sttaylor/FAMINE/
  • "Insurrection and rebellion would only lead to an aggravation of misery, the contemplation of which is sufficiently appalling to induce the right minded and humane to shrink from the consequences of recommending, even in the remotest contingency, any appeal to arms, unless, indeed, it were to invite the extirpation of the race as the only remedy against the destitution of which they are the unhappy victims." Pictorial Times, August 22, 1846 From Steve Taylor’s Website Views of the Famine http://adminstaff.vassar.edu/sttaylor/FAMINE/
  • during the famine years there was plenty of food in Ireland enough to feed double its population. Yes the potato failed but all other crops thrived. Under the system at the time Irish food was exported mainly to English markets but from they're found its way to many parts of the whereas a land that had so much food to export. In normal countries it was usual to export food only after its population was fed. This was not the case in Ireland; during the period her food was taken away against the wishes of her people, usually at gunpoint and escorted to the ports under military guard. It was then carried away on ships leaving misery and starvation behind. ring the famine years there was plenty of food in Ireland enough to blew its population. Yes the system at the time Irish food was exported mainly to English markets but from they're found its way to many parts of the world. It puzzled many a land that had so much food “ The potato failed from blight but the country was full of food, which was taken away from those who grew it, to be consumed by the expanding workforce of the industrial boom in England or by its army overseas.” http://www.wolfetonesofficialsite.com/famine.htm
  • "The ravages of disease at Skibbereen continue to be but too sadly confirmed. From a drawing made on the spot, we give a sketch of a scene of no unusual occurrence, as appears from the following extract of a letter from Skibbereen:--'Deaths here are daily increasing. Dr. Donovan and I are just this moment after returning from the village of South Reen, where we had to bury a body ourselves that was eleven days dead; and where do you think? In a kitchen garden. We had to dig the ground, or rather the hole, ourselves; no one would come near us, the smell was so intolerable. We are half dead from the work lately imposed on us.'" From Steve Taylor’s Website Views of the Famine http://adminstaff.vassar.edu/sttaylor/FAMINE/
  • A contemporary lithograph drawn by A. S. G. Stopford . From Steve Taylor’s Website Views of the Famine http://adminstaff.vassar.edu/sttaylor/FAMINE/
  •  “ The Illustration shows a benevolent attempt to mitigate the suffering in the city of Cork, viz., the Society of Friends' Soup House. There are many similar establishments in operation through the county; but, we prefer the annexed because the idea originated with the Society of Friends."Illustrated London News, January 16, 1847. From Steve Taylor’s Website Views of the Famine http://adminstaff.vassar.edu/sttaylor/FAMINE/  
  • “ I started from Cork for Skibbereen and saw little until we came to Clonakilty, where . . . the horrors of the poverty became visible, in the vast number of famished poor, who flocked around the coach to beg alms: amongst them was a woman carrying in her arms the corpse of a fine child, and making the most distressing appeal to the passengers for aid to enable her to purchase a coffin and bury her dear little baby. This horrible spectacle induced me to make some inquiry about her, when I learned from the people of the hotel that each day brings dozens of such applicants into the town.” James Mahony. Illustrated London News, February 13, 1847 . From Steve Taylor’s website Views of the Famine http://adminstaff.vassar.edu/sttaylor/FAMINE/
  • The painting from the late 19th century ( Evicted by Lady Butler, 1890, University College, Dublin) how Irish art had changed since the Famine years Evicted constitutes a new direction in Irish rural art. Portraying the after-effects of the destruction of the peasant woman's cabin, the beauty of the landscape (the Wicklow hills) complements the plight of the inhabitants. 'She too is a victim of historic exploitation, with no rights over the land she inhabits.'
  • ERIN-In forty years I have lost, through the operation of no natural law, more than Three Millions of my Sons and Daughters, and they, the Young and the Strong, leaving behind the Old and Inform to weep and die. Where is this to end?
  • Read this riveting 200-page story in softcover or ebook, or ask for it at your local bookstore and library: 1847 was the third year of the Great Hunger.  Never before had the potato failed even two years in a row. This year would come to be called “Black ’47.” British Prime Minister Russell said the famine was over. He was wrong. Ebook $9.99 Google ebook Kindle Nook Softcover $15.95 Amazon iUniverse