Mp Lt6

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Mp Lt6

  1. 1. Strategic Media Planning Media Planning Sunday, 27 December 2009
  2. 2. When to Emphasize Reach Sunday, 27 December 2009
  3. 3. Reach is emphasized whenever anything new is being planned in the marketplace. ( ) Sunday, 27 December 2009
  4. 4. Situations for Using Reach Strategy Sunday, 27 December 2009
  5. 5. New price reduction New distribution (stores that now carry the brand) New features of a product that meet consumers’ needs New advertising copy (new words and/or pictures) New sales promotion incentives New packaging Sunday, 27 December 2009
  6. 6. New price reduction New distribution (stores that now carry the brand) New features of a product that meet consumers’ needs New advertising copy (new words and/or pictures) New sales promotion incentives New packaging Sunday, 27 December 2009
  7. 7. New price reduction New distribution (stores that now carry the brand) New features of a product that meet consumers’ needs New advertising copy (new words and/or pictures) New sales promotion incentives New packaging Sunday, 27 December 2009
  8. 8. New price reduction New distribution (stores that now carry the brand) New features of a product that meet consumers’ needs New advertising copy (new words and/or pictures) New sales promotion incentives New packaging Sunday, 27 December 2009
  9. 9. New models of the brand being introduced New media being used for the first time New positions in the store where the brand is to be found New servicing opportunities New home-delivery patterns New marketing and/or advertising objectives for the brand. Sunday, 27 December 2009
  10. 10. New models of the brand being introduced New media being used for the first time New positions in the store where the brand is to be found New servicing opportunities New home-delivery patterns New marketing and/or advertising objectives for the brand. Sunday, 27 December 2009
  11. 11. New models of the brand being introduced New media being used for the first time New positions in the store where the brand is to be found New servicing opportunities New home-delivery patterns New marketing and/or advertising objectives for the brand. Sunday, 27 December 2009
  12. 12. The Required Reach Level Sunday, 27 December 2009
  13. 13. Given a marketing situation, there is no given reach level that should be set for a media plan. The required reach level is (1) the product of tradition, (2) experience, (3) common sense and (4) research done for particular brands in certain market situations. Most often, media planner sets the level basing on judgment and experience rather than research evidence. Sunday, 27 December 2009
  14. 14. Guidelines for Required Reach Level Sunday, 27 December 2009
  15. 15. The Desired Level of Brand Awareness ( ) Sunday, 27 December 2009
  16. 16. The Desired Level of Brand Awareness ( ) Based on the marketing objective of brand awareness, media planners may opt ( ) for a reach level equal or a bit higher than the desired level of brand awareness, on the assumption that not everyone exposed to a vehicle will be exposed to the ad and the brand name. Sunday, 27 December 2009
  17. 17. Competitors’ Level ( ) Sunday, 27 December 2009
  18. 18. Competitors’ Level ( ) One media-planning strategy might be to set a reach level equal to or surpassing ( ) that of competitors who are deemed ( ) to be vulnerable to attack ( ). Sunday, 27 December 2009
  19. 19. Competitors’ Level ( ) One media-planning strategy might be to set a reach level equal to or surpassing ( ) that of competitors who are deemed ( ) to be vulnerable to attack ( ). Presumably ( ) these competitors have products that are not as good as the brand in questions, or perhaps they are not advertising enough or to the right targets. Sunday, 27 December 2009
  20. 20. Budget ( ) Sunday, 27 December 2009
  21. 21. Budget ( ) One strategy is simply calculating the amount of target reach that can be afforded within the available budget, plus the amount of continuity ( ) desired. Sunday, 27 December 2009
  22. 22. Budget ( ) Another strategy is stretching ( ) media dollars and reach as well, i.e. cutting the ad sizes so that more money will be available to buy new reach. (For Example, 30-sec TV commercial to be cut as a 15-sec TV commercial) Sunday, 27 December 2009
  23. 23. Budget ( ) There are two penalties ( ) for cutting the ad sizes. (1) Firstly, the cost of smaller ad is not exactly proportional to larger ad, e.g. a half-page ad may cost about 55-65% of the full- page ad. ( 30 CUT 15 ) (2) Secondly, the smaller ad may have less communication value ( - ). Sunday, 27 December 2009
  24. 24. Previous Levels ( ) Sunday, 27 December 2009
  25. 25. Previous Levels Probably the best level of reach is determined by looking at what levels were used previously. If a brand has successfully achieved certain marketing goals in the past with a given level of reach, this same level (or proportional adjustment) should probably be used again. Sunday, 27 December 2009
  26. 26. When to Emphasize Frequency ( ) Sunday, 27 December 2009
  27. 27. The General Rule Sunday, 27 December 2009
  28. 28. The General Rule Whenever repetition ( ), not dispersion ( ), is the key selling strategy, by planner should emphasize frequency. Sunday, 27 December 2009
  29. 29. Situations for Using Frequency Strategy Sunday, 27 December 2009
  30. 30. Situations for Using Frequency Strategy Generally, high frequency is necessary to (1) compete in a highly competitive market or (2) when a product is sold frequently. Most planners find that there are two practical reasons for needing more than minimum amounts of frequency. Sunday, 27 December 2009
  31. 31. Threshold ( ) Sunday, 27 December 2009
  32. 32. Threshold ( ) Not everyone hears or sees an ad the first time it appears because so many ads bombard ( ) a person each day that it is impossible for anyone to pay attention to all of them. Sunday, 27 December 2009
  33. 33. - Stand By Me Sunday, 27 December 2009
  34. 34. Threshold ( ) Not everyone hears or sees an ad the first time it appears because so many ads bombard ( ) a person each day that it is impossible for anyone to pay attention to all of them. Even if an individual has seen an ad many times, the person might have absorbed ( ) little or none of the information. Sunday, 27 December 2009
  35. 35. Threshold ( ) Threshold is the no. of exposures that an average audience will absorb the message. Research has shown that there are indeed ( ) threshold levels for some advertising. Sunday, 27 December 2009
  36. 36. Vehicle Exposure Sunday, 27 December 2009
  37. 37. Vehicle exposure In media planning, research services measure vehicle exposures. Such measurement always overstates ( ) the number of times a person is exposed to the ads (i.e. the advertising exposure). However, there is no syndicated ( ) research measurement of ad exposure. Sunday, 27 December 2009
  38. 38. So........ Sunday, 27 December 2009
  39. 39. Because of the above two reasons, planners often propose higher frequency plan for ensuring the target audiences were exposed to sufficient ads. Many media planners believe that for effective communication to take place, the target audience should receive at least three exposures. (Similar findings from Naple Study) Sunday, 27 December 2009
  40. 40. The Required Frequency Level Sunday, 27 December 2009
  41. 41. Uniqueness of Message ( ) Sunday, 27 December 2009
  42. 42. Uniqueness of Message ( ) The more innovative ( ) and unusual the message is, the more likely consumers will notice it and pay attention to it. As a result, less frequency level is required. ( frequency D) The converse ( ) is also true Sunday, 27 December 2009
  43. 43. - Sunday, 27 December 2009
  44. 44. Uniqueness of Message ( ) A rather ordinary ad message might need many more than four exposures to be seen and remembered. ( ) Planners must be aware that creative executions vary from brand to brand, and the creative element can argue for more or less frequency than the competition uses. Sunday, 27 December 2009
  45. 45. - Sunday, 27 December 2009
  46. 46. Perceived Value of the Brand ( ) Sunday, 27 December 2009
  47. 47. Perceived Value of the Brand ( ) When a brand has higher perceived value, i.e. important and easily perceivable benefits to customers, that is not shared by competitors, then less frequency is called for. For example, the brand “Apple” has an easily exploited ( ) advantage over competitors. Sunday, 27 December 2009
  48. 48. Apple - iPhone - TVC Sunday, 27 December 2009
  49. 49. Perceived Value of the Brand ( ) But when a brand is very much like all other brands in a product category, more frequency is necessary for the message to be noticed or remembered. Sunday, 27 December 2009
  50. 50. Competitors’ Levels ( ) Sunday, 27 December 2009
  51. 51. Competitors’ Levels ( ) Frequency level should equals or surpasses the direct competitor’s level, with the objective of gaining an advantage. Sunday, 27 December 2009
  52. 52. Nike Sunday, 27 December 2009
  53. 53. adidas Sunday, 27 December 2009
  54. 54. Media Values ( ) Sunday, 27 December 2009
  55. 55. Media Values ( ) Media value is simply the judgment that a given medium is more effective for a brand and its creative message, thus justifying more frequency in that medium. Sunday, 27 December 2009
  56. 56. Media Values ( ) It is not merely the figures of CPM or CPP. It considers the synergy between the creative message and the media itself, which is then compared with the media cost. Sunday, 27 December 2009
  57. 57. Effective Frequency and Reach ( ) Sunday, 27 December 2009
  58. 58. Effective Frequency Level Sunday, 27 December 2009
  59. 59. Although the three-plus level has been used for a number of years, planners should not automatically assume this should be the goal for every media plan. One way to estimate the number of exposures needed for communication to take place is to begin by reviewing the different variables that can affect it. ( ) ( review) Sunday, 27 December 2009
  60. 60. Factors That Affect Effective Frequency Sunday, 27 December 2009
  61. 61. Sunday, 27 December 2009
  62. 62. Scheduling ( ) Sunday, 27 December 2009
  63. 63. Scheduling ( ) Scheduling depicts ( ) the buying times and hence the pattern ( ) by plotting the advertising timing on a yearly flowchart ( ). Sunday, 27 December 2009
  64. 64. There are three major methods of scheduling, namely continuity flighting pulsing Sunday, 27 December 2009
  65. 65. first step... Sunday, 27 December 2009
  66. 66. first step The first step in selecting the scheduling method (the pattern) is to examine purchasing patterns for the product category. For example, Christmas trees are rarely purchased at any time of the year other than November or December. This would suggest the need for a seasonal flighting (or bursting) adverting pattern. Sunday, 27 December 2009
  67. 67. Mentholatum Sunday, 27 December 2009
  68. 68. Mentholatum Sunday, 27 December 2009
  69. 69. Mentholatum Sunday, 27 December 2009
  70. 70. first step In contrast, face soap is purchased throughout the year, though with heavier consumption in the summer. Therefore, the best scheduling plan might be pulsing (year-round advertising with “heavy-up”, or extra weight, in the summer) Sunday, 27 December 2009
  71. 71. Sunday, 27 December 2009
  72. 72. Continuity ( ) Sunday, 27 December 2009
  73. 73. Continuity The continuity pattern is continuous, e.g. one ad every day for 365 days a year. Sometimes, it comes with short gaps at regular intervals when no advertising is done, e.g. one ad a week for 52 weeks. (But NOT one ad a month for 12 months). Sunday, 27 December 2009
  74. 74. First Reason Sunday, 27 December 2009
  75. 75. DO WANT CONSUMERS TO FORGET... Sunday, 27 December 2009
  76. 76. first reason The first reason for continuity is that an advertiser has a message that it does not want consumers to forget ( ). Sunday, 27 December 2009
  77. 77. EXTRA Sunday, 27 December 2009
  78. 78. Advantages of continuous advertising are... ... Sunday, 27 December 2009
  79. 79. “reminder” Sunday, 27 December 2009
  80. 80. it works as a reminder and keep the message always before the consumer. ( ) Sunday, 27 December 2009
  81. 81. Coca-Cola Sunday, 27 December 2009
  82. 82. “entire” Sunday, 27 December 2009
  83. 83. it works as a reminder and keep the message always before the consumer. ( ) it covers the entire purchase cycle because there will be no gaping holes in time. ( ) Sunday, 27 December 2009
  84. 84. Yakult Sunday, 27 December 2009
  85. 85. “recency” Sunday, 27 December 2009
  86. 86. it works as a reminder and keep the message always before the consumer. ( ) it covers the entire purchase cycle because there will be no gaping holes in time. ( ) it is the most effective strategy by the recency theory. (Recency Theory refers to the belief that advertisements and promotions are most effective when they air immediately pior to the time of decision and that the influence of ad exposure diminishes with time.) Sunday, 27 December 2009
  87. 87. Recency Theory Recency Theory refers to the belief that advertisements and promotions are most effective when they air immediately pior to the time of decision and that the influence of ad exposure diminishes with time. Sunday, 27 December 2009
  88. 88. Moreover... Sunday, 27 December 2009
  89. 89. Another reason for continuity is that it permits ( ) the advertiser to larger quantity discounts in media buying ( ). Sunday, 27 December 2009
  90. 90. In Addition... Sunday, 27 December 2009
  91. 91. In addition, the advertiser will have the advantage in obtaining certain kinds of desirable positioning ( ) within media, including broadcast and print media. Sunday, 27 December 2009
  92. 92. Flighting ( ) Sunday, 27 December 2009
  93. 93. Flighting ( ) Flighting (or Bursting) is an intermittent ( ) pattern with gaps of time when no advertising is done, e.g. advertising done once a month. Sunday, 27 December 2009
  94. 94. Flighting ( ) Sunday, 27 December 2009
  95. 95. Reasons for Flighting Sunday, 27 December 2009
  96. 96. first reason Sunday, 27 December 2009
  97. 97. first reason The first reason for using flighting is that it is better than continuity for certain situations. Sunday, 27 December 2009
  98. 98. Advantages Sunday, 27 December 2009
  99. 99. Advantages it allows the advertiser to meet competition better by placing advertising at most favorable times relative to competition. ( ) Sunday, 27 December 2009
  100. 100. Advantages it allows the advertiser to meet competition better by placing advertising at most favorable times relative to competition. ( ) it can precisely ( ) reach the best purchasing cycle ( ) periods with little waste when buying is slow Sunday, 27 December 2009
  101. 101. second reason Sunday, 27 December 2009
  102. 102. second reason The second reason for using flight is budget limitation or sharp sales fluctuations ( ). The advertiser buys ads only when sales are growing and drops out when sales trends are declining. ( ...) Sunday, 27 December 2009
  103. 103. third reason Sunday, 27 December 2009
  104. 104. third reason The third reason is that flighting allows planners to support advertising in one medium by another medium simultaneously ( ), e.g. use TV as the basic medium and add some radio and newspaper ads at same times. Sunday, 27 December 2009
  105. 105. Finally Sunday, 27 December 2009
  106. 106. Finally Finally, flighting allows a series of ads to appear as a unified ( ) campaign rather than as a series of unrelated ( ) ads. Concentrating them a certain times of the year causes the ads to appear to consumer as part of a single communication entity ( ) Sunday, 27 December 2009
  107. 107. Drawbacks for Flighting Sunday, 27 December 2009
  108. 108. So much advertising may be concentrated in one time period that the effectiveness wears out before the flight is over ( ) Sunday, 27 December 2009
  109. 109. So much advertising may be concentrated in one time period that the effectiveness wears out before the flight is over ( ) So much time may elapse ( ) between flights that consumers might forget the essence of advertising message. ( ) Sunday, 27 December 2009
  110. 110. So much advertising may be concentrated in one time period that the effectiveness wears out before the flight is over ( ) So much time may elapse ( ) between flights that consumers might forget the essence of advertising message. ( ) Competitors sometimes take advantage of the advertiser by placing heavy ad precisely at the time the advertiser is not advertising. ( ) Sunday, 27 December 2009
  111. 111. HKBN Sunday, 27 December 2009
  112. 112. PCCW Sunday, 27 December 2009
  113. 113. Pulsing ( ) Sunday, 27 December 2009
  114. 114. Pulsing ( ) Pulsing is a mixture of continuity and flighting, and represents the best of both techniques. ( ) Pulsing is the safest of the three because it covers different marketing situations. It best fit product categories that are sold year-round but heavier concentrations of sales at intermittent periods. Sunday, 27 December 2009
  115. 115. Coca-cola Sunday, 27 December 2009
  116. 116. Coca-cola Sunday, 27 December 2009

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