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Occupational science, narratives and playing the french 2005

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  • Name change – apologies to the Horn Player who so kindly agreed to be interviewed. The reason will become apparent Quote taken from Zemke and Clarke 1996
  • Give out sheet A – picking up the horn for the first time. Read it through together
  • So it can be seen that there is a narrative on sheet A Characters The Horn Player Michael, his son     What is the plot of the narrative? How the Horn Player came to recognise the horn as his favoured instrument and gained new value to the military band.
  • Describe method and sample, a little. North West Serious leisure Unstructured interviews
  • People make their own sense of events and construct personal continuity over time. Past experience, present identity, anticipated futures. We constantly construct our identity. New events are told in narratives in order to interpret them. This often happens in conversation with others. The research interview also elicits narrative telling – but the researcher must be aware of the impact that they have on the construction of identity. We interpret our earlier life in the light of what we now know (Lawlor 2000) Polkinghorne (1991) ’ Like each episode singly, my life as a whole – that is, my self – is something temporal that unfolds in time and whose phases I survey prospectively and retrospectively from within an ever changing present.’ (p143) also – ‘It is the narratively structured unity of my life as a whole that provides me with a personal identity and displays the answer to “Who am I?”.’
  • How the individual makes sense of events By retelling what happened How the individual chooses to present themselves to other people (including the researcher/interviewer) why this version of events and not another? Identity taken as a process of self-definition, very closely tied in with what we do, and how we account for ourselves. How the individual is situated in their culture We come to be who we are by being located, or locating ourselves in social narratives rarely of our own making . (Somers, 1994)
  • There are several approaches eg life story research Look at sheet B – the analysis
  • Sarbin talks about duty and obligation, wisdom and folly, pride and shame, honour and dishonour
  • Polkinghorne talks about the person who actively sets goals, strives to achieve them, overcomes obstacles, actualises ideas
  • Who am I?’, ‘who am I not?’, ‘who am I like?’, ‘who am I not like?’
  • What can I do with that phrase of his? – ‘ this is fantastic, this instrument’ This is a tentative category
  • People make their own sense of events and construct personal continuity over time. Past experience, present identity, anticipated futures. We constantly construct our identity. New events are told in narratives in order to interpret them. This often happens in conversation with others. The research interview also elicits narrative telling – but the researcher must be aware of the impact that they have on the construction of identity. We interpret our earlier life in the light of what we now know (Lawlor 2000) Polkinghorne (1991) ’ Like each episode singly, my life as a whole – that is, my self – is something temporal that unfolds in time and whose phases I survey prospectively and retrospectively from within an ever changing present.’ (p143) also – ‘It is the narratively structured unity of my life as a whole that provides me with a personal identity and displays the answer to “Who am I?”.’
  • Transcript

    • 1. Occupational Science,Narratives and Playing the French English Horn Jackie Taylor “to be human is to be ‘there’, caught up in the world, taking a stand on one’s life, active and engaged in ordinary situations, with some overview of what is at stake in living” HeideggerMay 2005 Jackie Taylor
    • 2. OutlineWhy am I interested in playing the English horn?Why am I interested in narratives?What is all this to do with occupational science, and more importantly occupational therapy?May 2005 Jackie Taylor
    • 3. Playing the English hornWhen someone tells me stories about their occupations:  what do I learn about the person? And their interaction with the occupation? the social world? the physical world? And what else?May 2005 Jackie Taylor
    • 4. The Horn PlayerA successful, well-educated scientist, a technical director, travels widely with his jobWhite Caucasian English, lives in LancashireMid 40s, lives with wife and 3 childrenMay 2005 Jackie Taylor
    • 5. What is a narrative?A story about something that happenedSet in time and placeA beginning, middle and endCharactersA plot unfoldsIt can be told differently in different situationsMay 2005 Jackie Taylor
    • 6. This narrative was part of an interview … in which there The were several horn narratives …..May 2005 Jackie Taylor
    • 7. The interview is part of a life … in which there are many narratives Research told…... interview There is a theory that our identity is a narrativeMay 2005 Jackie Taylor
    • 8. What do narratives tell us?How the individual makes sense of eventsHow ‘doing’ relates to ‘being’How the individual chooses to present themselves to other people (including the researcher/interviewer)How the individual is situated in their cultureMay 2005 Jackie Taylor
    • 9. Narrative analysisThere are several approachesAll approaches preserve the wholeness of the narrative, events sequenced into plotContext is part of analysisAgar and Hobbs Global coherence Local coherence Themal coherenceMay 2005 Jackie Taylor
    • 10. Who is the Horn Player?The Moral Self Playing /working hard is important Family is important Loyalty and commitment are important (and therefore conflicts arise)May 2005 Jackie Taylor
    • 11. Who is the Horn Player?The Agentic Self I am often the happy victim of circumstances. I like to be in control!May 2005 Jackie Taylor
    • 12. Who is the Horn Player?The Social Self I don’t want you to think I’m bragging. I think there are others better than meMay 2005 Jackie Taylor
    • 13. Who is the Horn Player?Occupational self??? I find wonderment and excitement in music I have a fair degree of mastery in my music I welcome challenge in music I am a part of a musical tradition that must be passed on to the youngMay 2005 Jackie Taylor
    • 14. Occupational Sciencethe study of the human as an occupational being including the need for and capacity to engage in and orchestrate daily occupations in the environment over the lifespan(Yerxa, 1989)May 2005 Jackie Taylor
    • 15. Occupational Science Individuals are studied in interaction with their environment The complexity of occupations is acknowledged and studied person’s experience of occupation is studied generates knowledge about the form, function and the meaning of human occupationMay 2005 Jackie Taylor
    • 16. Playing the English Horn. Being a Horn Player. Place - Time – North-West Research life-span interview Family life Time – Late 20th century Work life Horn Culture – player’s Culture – Modesty life Brass bands and military bandsMay 2005 Jackie Taylor

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