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Diction Use
Diction Use
Diction Use
Diction Use
Diction Use
Diction Use
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Diction Use

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  • 1. Diction Word choice, or general character of the language used by the author. Words have three levels, and are selected based on their efficiency in these three areas:
    • Appearance
    • Sound
    • Meaning
  • 2. Objective vs. Subjective
    • Objective : Impersonal and unemotional language
    • Example : “The lawn started at the beach and ran toward the front door for a quarter of a mile” ( The Great Gatsby, page 6).
    • vs.
    • Subjective : Personal and emotional language
    • Example : There was a slow, pleasant movement in the air, scarcely a wind, promising a cool, lovely day. ( The Great Gatsby, page 152)
  • 3. Vulgarity
    • This is a type of non standard diction.
    • Vulgarity is language that is deficient in taste and refinement.
    • Example : “Goddamn FBI don't respect nothin’” (Sonny, in The Godfather ).
  • 4. Informal/Standard Diction
    • This type of diction is language that is correct but conversational. It is used in casual situations, but still states accurate facts.
    • Example : “We’ve heard names. That’s Johnny. Those two- they’re twins, Sam ‘n Eric” ( Lord of the Flies , page 21).
  • 5. Formal/Literate Diction
    • This type of diction is the language that is appropriate in more formal occasions.
    • Example : “You are all kindness,
    • Madame; but I believe we must
    • abide by our original plan” ( Pride
    • and Prejudice, page 143).
  • 6. Works Cited
    • Austen, Jane. Pride and Prejudice . Minneapolis: Dover Publications, Incorporated, 1995. 143.
    • Fitzgerald, F. Scott. The Great Gatsby . New York: Scribner, 2004. 6.
    • The Godfather . Dir. Francis F. Coppola. Perf. Al Pacino, James Caan, and Marlon Brando. 1972.
    • Golding, William. Lord of the Flies . New York: Perigee Trade, 2001. 21.

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