• Share
  • Email
  • Embed
  • Like
  • Save
  • Private Content
Stop Bullying Campaign
 

Stop Bullying Campaign

on

  • 1,871 views

The purpose of this project is to define bullying, its possible root cause, and the typical characteristics of bullies. We will identify the types of people, whom bullies target, the effects on ...

The purpose of this project is to define bullying, its possible root cause, and the typical characteristics of bullies. We will identify the types of people, whom bullies target, the effects on victims (Copeland, 2013), methods to neutralize it, and coping, educational and training opportunities, such as in schools (Hong, 2009) and partnering with parents to help defuse bullying (Jordan, 2012).
 
Bullying is an age old problem in which seems to be out of control, affecting numerous youths in its downward spiral. The behavior of bullying affects everyone from witnesses, or bystanders, to faculty, staff and parents. Victims of bullying carry the burden of these impacts, like scars and baggage, into their adult lives, thus creating a number of life-long challenges.

Recognize: Ask yourself what is happening, what type of bullying is occurring, is it physical, emotional, cyber or covert?
Respond: If you see someone being bullied, do something about it in a safe manner. Do not be a bystander and allow the act of bullying to continue.
Listen: Give others the chance to speak up. If a bully needs to talk, let them. They will have ample opportunity to explain their actions. If a victim wants to talk, let them. They will have the opportunity to explain how they are being affected and need to know that there is support for them.
Promote safety: When listening to bullies and victims, promote acceptance and value. Let the person know that they are respected. Connect with the person, offer support.
Inform: Educate everyone, including parents, families, teachers, students, workplaces, faculty and staff etc. Inform them of the severity of bullying and its impacts.
Share valuable, free resource information to schools, parents and the community through our anti-bullying Facebook page: https://www.facebook.com/jacinta.roybal.7

Statistics

Views

Total Views
1,871
Views on SlideShare
1,871
Embed Views
0

Actions

Likes
0
Downloads
68
Comments
0

0 Embeds 0

No embeds

Accessibility

Categories

Upload Details

Uploaded via as Adobe PDF

Usage Rights

© All Rights Reserved

Report content

Flagged as inappropriate Flag as inappropriate
Flag as inappropriate

Select your reason for flagging this presentation as inappropriate.

Cancel
  • Full Name Full Name Comment goes here.
    Are you sure you want to
    Your message goes here
    Processing…
Post Comment
Edit your comment

    Stop Bullying Campaign Stop Bullying Campaign Presentation Transcript

    • Stop Bullying Campaign: It’s Everybody's Responsibility Tiffany Elwood, Robert Messer, Lois Roberts, Jacinta Roybal, Brittany Wise Walden University
    • Analysis The increase of media coverage of victims’ negative actions as a result from being targeted by bullying has created increased social awareness and concern of the effects of bullying. Society has created a social norm that bullying is acceptable in society, politics and successful business entrepreneurs, creating difficulty for adjusting the “social norm” perception of the acceptance of bullying. Based upon our analysis of The 5 Whys of bullying, we have concluded that bullying occurs as a result of the low self-image of the perpetrator in bullying situations. Addressing the cause of bullying is the foundation for the determination of proper solutions, which will lead to the neutralization of the devastating effects of bullying .
    • Introduction Bullies come in all ages, shapes, sizes and colors. Bullies intimidate others verbally, physically, and emotionally, victimizing as, perhaps, they were once victimized. Bullying has been around for ages and is a global issue with a changing face. No longer is bullying limited to passing a mean, ill-intended note across the classroom, gossiping about another, or pushing a child on the playground. The bully’s playground has been electrified through the use of technology, such as cell phones, internet and social media. Bullies may be victims of their past, who learned to use unacceptable bullying behaviors to victimize others.
    • Purpose and Summary The purpose of this project is to define bullying, its possible root cause, and the typical characteristics of bullies. We will identify the types of people, whom bullies target, the effects on victims (Copeland, 2013), methods to neutralize it, and coping, educational and training opportunities, such as in schools (Hong, 2009) and partnering with parents to help defuse bullying (Jordan, 2012). Bullying is an age old problem in which seems to be out of control, affecting numerous youths in its downward spiral. The behavior of bullying affects everyone from witnesses, or bystanders, to faculty, staff and parents. Victims of bullying carry the burden of these impacts, like scars and baggage, into their adult lives, thus creating a number of lifelong challenges.
    • Goals 1. expand awareness of bullying 2. promote education and training by sharing existing anti-bullying campaigns 3. teach bystanders to intervene, when safe to do so 4. cultivate a culture of community and communication in society where bullying becomes as publicly unacceptable as infidelity, theft, and sexual harassment 5. Contact schools to spread awareness 6. Create awareness through our Facebook page To get more updated information, follow and “Like” Group D’s Facebook Page. StopBullying Campaign: https://www.facebook.com/jacinta.roybal.7
    • Key Actions It is important to keep in mind that these individual key actions focus on the problems. Recognize: Ask yourself what is happening, what type of bullying is occurring, is it physical, emotional, cyber or covert? Respond: If you see someone being bullied, do something about it in a safe manner. Do not be a bystander and allow the act of bullying to continue. Listen: Give others the chance to speak up. If a bully needs to talk, let them. They will have ample opportunity to explain their actions. If a victim wants to talk, let them. They will have the opportunity to explain how they are being affected and need to know that there is support for them. Promote safety: When listening to bullies and victims, promote acceptance and value. Let the person know that they are respected. Connect with the person, offer support. Inform: Educate everyone, including parents, families, teachers, students, workplaces, faculty and staff etc. Inform them of the severity of bullying and its impacts. Share valuable, free resource information to schools, parents and the community through our anti-bullying Facebook page: https://www.facebook.com/jacinta.roybal.7
    • Expected Outcomes The expected outcomes for the individualized action plans include:  A decrease in the number of people being bullied  An increase in bystander intervention  A decrease in the number of suicides as a direct result of bullying  A decrease in the number of bullies  A higher number of people speaking up whether bystanders or victims or friends of victims  Stronger social skills based on good moral behavior
    • Recent Media Coverage of Bullying
    • Why Is Bullying In the News so Frequently?  Attention from the increase of suicides of bullied victims.  Attention from the increase amount of victim created YouTube videos.  There is greater awareness of the seriousness of bullying, which could be due to higher reported rates by students.  The addition of cyberbullying as a new, easy, and round-the-clock place to bully. Examples: Suicide of Amanda Todd after YouTube Video Jonah Mowry’s YouTube Video Pittsburgh School Shooting: Bullied Student Behind Gunfire
    • Why Is Bully Awareness Important?  Bullying can lead to health problems for victims that last throughout adulthood.  Bullied victims consider suicide.  Bullied students that are more likely to skip or drop out of school.  Victims could retaliate in the form of school shootings.  Teenage victims could consider suicide.  Bullying statistics and research have conveyed that bullying is a major societal problem.  Through increased awareness and bystander intervention, bullies may realize that their actions are unacceptable and may have serious consequences.
    • What Is Bullying? Bullying is an intentional act where there is a “difference of power between the bully and the victim,” and occurs globally, affecting up to fifty-four percent of children (Ball, 2008). Bullies and victims are identified as having various conduct disorders and co-occurring unemotional traits with a need for dominance, marked by impulsivity and narcissism (Fanti, 2013). Bullying is but is not limited to hitting, pushing, name calling, teasing beyond limits accepted by victim, blocking a hallway, door or locker to prevent person for passing by, knocking books out of another’s arms, gossiping, talking badly about another or making fun of someone and intentional exclusion.
    • What Is NOT Bullying?  Disagreements of opinions between two people  Feedback that is meant for improvement  One-time outbursts of frustration  Being overlooked or unintentionally left out  Questioning the creditability of another person’s information Children may be biased when they process social cues and interpret ambiguous situations as being hostile, when bullying is not actually occurring. Students may perceive an action is bullying when it is not truly a bullying situation.
    • The Four Types of Bullying According to the National Centre Against Bullying (2010) there are four types of bullying: 1. Physical Bullying: Actions that harm a person or property. 2. Emotional Bullying: Verbal abuse such as teasing and name calling. 3. Covert Bullying: When a bully sneaks to publically humiliate a target and damage a person’s reputation. 4. Cyber Bullying: Cyberbullying is usually defined as a form of bullying that uses electronic means such as email, mobile phone calls, text messages, instant messenger contact, photos, social networking sites, and person web pages, with the intention of causing harm to another person through repeated hostile conduct (Ortega, R., 2012).
    • The Cyber Bullying: A Major Concern Based upon our analysis of bullying cyber bullying has escalated and is a very serious problem. The concerns are:  Social Media is very popular among pre-adolescence and teenagers.  Social Media has created a new weapon for bullying.  Bullies have 24-hour access to target and intentionally cause harm.  Social Media can be used as a tool to humiliate and bully to large audiences.  Bullies can create and hide behind fake identities through social media accounts.  Bullies can manipulate targets by making them think they are interested in dating the victim, only to use the information to blackmail, tease, or humiliate, or psychologically harm victims.  Cyber bullies even suggest to victims, “Why don’t you just kill your self?”
    • Bully Research Studies  A study conducted by Shakoor (2012) estimates twenty-seven percent of children and adolescents are bullied worldwide .  A study shows that over half of school age children are bullies, victims, or bully victims. Bullies are usually victims (Fanti, 2013).  2007 National Crime Victimization Survey School Crime Supplement surveyed 12-18 year old students in public school to research the topic of bullying. The survey results indicated that only 36 percent of the victims from school bullying harassment, reported the occurrence to school employees or officials (Petrosino, Guckenburg, DeVoe, & Hanson, 2010). This data continues to reflect that 64 percent of the researched students did not report their victimization of bullying to a school staff member.
    • Why Do Bullies Bully? Bullying is an intentional act where there is a “difference of power between the bully and the victim,” and occurs globally, affecting up to fifty-four percent of children (Ball, 2008).  Cultural Causes - society promotes aggressive, winning behavior.  Institutional Causes - schools and companies don’t encourage respect for everyone.  Social Issues - bullies receive attention, even if it is based on negative actions.  Family Issues - Parents could exhibit similar bullying characteristics towards the child. Narcissism and interpersonal manipulation also plays role (Fanti, 2013).  Genetics - behavioral and temperament issues have been linked to aggressive behaviors such as bullying (Shakoor, 2012).  The Bully's Personal History - bullies have been told they were worthless.  Having Power - bullies desire to control of another person.  Provocative Victims Bullies think their victims deserve it, “I’ll show them.”
    • The Psychology of a Bully  Various conduct disorders and co-occurring callous-unemotional traits with a strong need for dominance, with impulsivity and narcissism (Fanti, 2013).  Bullying is a social-ecological problem in which it is not possible to create a “profile” of a bully (Swearer, 2010).  Bullies and their victims suffer from low self-regard, depression, violent behaviors and anxiety (Ball, 2008).  Social dominance and social interdependence studies indicate the role it plays in bullying (Choi, 2011).  A study shows that over half of school age children are bullies, victims, or bully victims, or those who bully others and are also victims of bullying (Fanti, 2013).
    • The Psychology of a Bully (continued) Our research also found information from an addictions expert and school programs teacher, Scott Gallagher, that the common complaint expressed by addicts, including bullies, is that they have been victims themselves. Gallagher describes this as destructive self-victimization. “School Speaker Discovers the Root Cause of Bullying, Obsessive Compulsions and All Addictions” http://www.pr9.net/teens/schooltime/9420september.html#www_thepowerofc hoice_ca
    • Long Term Effects of Being a Bully  Childhood bullies have a higher risk to participate in alcohol and drug abuse as teens.  Bullies are more likely to start fights, damage property, and quit school.  Begin having sex at earlier ages.  Childhood bullies are most likely to have criminal convictions as adults.  As adults, bully behavior could continue and result in abuse to romantic partners.  All of the following were affected in both bully and bully victim, psychological issues, including health, criminality, alcohol and drug use, sexual and social relationships, education, incomes, abuse and neglect in childhood, mental illness, and family functioning (Riggio, 2013).
    • How Bullying Affects Victims Victims are affected in many negative ways. They may develop the following:  anxieties and depression  fear  feeling of loneliness  feelings of worthlessness and poor self-image  eating and sleeping patterns could change  interest in participating in criminal activities  experience health problems  decreased academic achievement, possibly leading to drop outs
    • Long Term Effects for Bully Victims  psychological issues, including health  criminality  alcohol and drug use  sexual and social relationships  education  incomes  abuse  neglect in childhood  mental illness  family functioning Source: Riggio, 2013.
    • Why Victims Don’t Speak Up? There are many reasons why victims do not report bullying or speak out about it, such as:  Fear retaliation from the perpetrator.  Could be threatened by the bully to keep quite.  Fear that teachers will think they are being a tattle tale.  May believe that they deserve the bullying.  May expect adults to handle the bully.  Victims of cyber-bullying are afraid parents will take away the internet.
    • Why Bystanders Don’t Speak Up? Research has indicated that when bystanders intervene, bullying decreases by 50%. The reasons why witnesses do not act:  Do not know what to do to help someone  Do not want to be a target  Think that someone else will help  Think that only an adult can help the victim Some bystanders are actually affected by witnessing bullying behavior. Bystanders, who do not stop the bully, can easily be influenced to participate in alcohol, tobacco, and drugs, to make sure they fit in
    • Tips to Avoid Being Bullied 1. Be Confident Bullies target kids who the bully thinks are weak and will not fight back. Bullies will only repeat picking on someone if they think they can get away with it. 2. Do not show the bully that your feelings are hurt. Of course it hurts, but bullies gain satisfaction in knowing they hurt someone’s feelings. Tell your parents, friends, and people you trust how it makes you feel. 3. Try to ignore a bully. If you are unable to ignore a bully, then agree with what the bully says. If you agree with the bully, the bully does not gain satisfaction. 4. It is NOT your fault and no one deserves to be bullied. 5. Make light and add humor to what the bullying says. 6. Change the subject to redirect the bully’s focus.
    • Tips to Avoid Being Bullied (continued) 7. Stay in a group with friends. Surround yourself with people who you can trust and make you feel safe. 8. Avoid the bully: Play near playground monitors or adults. Choose a seat in the cafeteria where teachers and workers can see you. Go to the restroom at different times. Select different routes to classes. Bullies like to pick on kids where adults are not paying attention. Stay or play where school staff can see you. 9. Do not brag or carry expensive items to school.
    • Help Hotlines for Victims National Suicide Prevention Hotline 800-273-8255 www.suicidepreventionlifeline .org Crisis Call Center 800-273-8255 or text ANSWER to 839863 http://crisiscallcenter.org/crisi sservices.html The Trevor Lifeline Resource for Lesbian, Gay, Bisexual, & Transgender Youth 866-4-U-TREVOR or 866-488-7386 http://www.thetrevorproject.org
    • How to Stop Bullying When You See It? Bystanders are the most effective way to stop a bully. 50% of bullies stop picking on a student if told to stop bullying by a bystander,(Office of the Education Ombuds, 2012).  Remain calm, but be assertive.  Speak in a strong, firm voice when speaking to a bully.  Look the bully in the eyes when you are talking to him or her.  Use good choice of words when talking to the bully.  Keep a calm demeanor and a facial expression, a bully is constantly gauging your reactions. BE CONFIDENT during the conversation.
    • How Parents Can Help Parents play a key role in neutralizing the effects of bullying for their children and building their children’s self-esteem.  Ask questions about your child’s day.  Watch your child for signs of being bullied, as often he or she may be too embarrassed to tell you or does not want lectured about it.  If your child tells you that he or she is being bullied, Listen carefully to your child's report of being bullied.  Be sympathetic and take the problem seriously.  Do not to overreact or under react.  Do not blame the victim, but offer support.  Do not criticize the child, with phrases such as: “Well, what did you do to bring it on or start it?” “You need to start standing up for yourself.” Realize that home is their only refuge. Expect him or her to have some difficult times in dealing with victimization.
    • How Parents Can Help (continued) Get professional help if you think your child needs it. Encourage your child to keep talking to you. Spend extra time with her or him. Provide constant support and encouragement, and tell her or him how much you love them! Set the example of good, positive relationships Demonstrate good self-control Do not show aggressive behavior and talk in threatening manners to your child or anyone Teach your children that violence is unacceptable Identify and name the adverse effects of aggression/bullying Explain how a victim of bullying may feel.
    • Effective Ways for Schools Promote AntiBullying: Zero Tolerance – Anti-Bullying Campaigns School promoting Get students to make posters, banners, and create slogans Schools supported student based groups to discuss bullying School create a sincere video message from school staff to all students Olweus Bullying Prevention Kickoff Video http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=sDWWGeLKgpY
    • Schools Can Deter Bullying Schools can promote Stop-Bullying Campaigns in various ways with no additional costs.  School programs should use a multi-faceted approach to address the problem.  Rules prohibiting bullying behaviors should be clearly posted.  Encourage parents to get active in bullying awareness and zero- tolerance programs.  Engage students to create posters and banners to display throughout the school about zero tolerance and bully prevention.  Parents of bullies and victims should be notified and participate in the school programs.  All teachers should work with students discouraging bullying in every classroom.  Have students role-play a bullying situation. Children understand modeling behaviors and role-play and acting out bullying situations is a very effective tool.  School officials should identify hot spots for bullying activities and monitor those locations regularly.  Encourage students to create groups that accept diversity and “doing the right thing.”  Begin bullying awareness programs in early grade schools.
    • Prevention Resources for Schools The bully prevention program, Bully Busters: A Teacher's Manual for Helping Bullies, Victims, and Bystanders (Newman, Home, & Bartolomucci, 2000). The 7 Module training for teachers(Gottfredson & Gottfredson, 1985; Stephenson & Smith, 1989) (Johnstone, Munn, & Edwards, 1991; Kikkawa, 1987; Olweus, 1978).
    • Training Modules for Training Teachers Module 1: Increasing Awareness of Bullying Module 2: Recognizing the Bully Module 3: Recognizing the Victim Module 4: Taking Charge: Interventions for Bullying Behavior Module 5: Assisting Victims: Recommendations and Interventions Module 6: The Role of Prevention Module 7: Relaxation and Coping Skills Recommendations to implement a continuing education teacher training curriculum designed to educate the teacher on the components of bully awareness, prevention, and interventions (Gottfredson & Gottfredson, 1985; Stephenson & Smith, 1989)
    • Interview with School Resource Officer Interview conducted with a school resource officer by Roybal, Jacinta (2013)  Resource officer examines bullying prevention is a group effort that requires the diligent efforts from parents, teachers, and community.  Resource officer explains that a solution cannot be found through the school systems alone; it must be a joint effort.  The resource officer identifies that children need discipline and structure in and out of school to correct bullying behavior.
    • Conclusion Our analysis of bullying has lead us to the following conclusions:  Bullying is a significant problem that should never be tolerated or accepted.  Whether the root cause of bullying is believed to be genetic, destructive selfvictimization, or low self-image, the devastating effects of bullying can be neutralized through training, education and support of teachers, support staff and parents.  Parents play a key role in helping with this situation by setting good examples, raising their children with good morals, love, warmth and a strong sense of self-worth.  Children need to know what to do when bullied and to not feel ashamed or embarrassed to report bullying.
    • Conclusion  There is help if you are a bully or a victim.  Bystanders have the power to reduce bullying by fifty percent. To get more updated information, follow and “Like” Group D’s Facebook Page. Stop-Bullying Campaign: https://www.facebook.com/jacinta.roybal.7 “No one can make you feel inferior without your consent.” by: Eleanor Roosevelt, This is My Story
    • References Ball H., Arseneault L., Taylor A., Maughan B., Caspi A., Moffitt T. Genetic and environmental influences on victims, bullies and bully-victims in childhood. Journal of Child Psychology & Psychiatry [serial online]. January 2008;49(1):104-114. Available from: Academic Search Complete, Ipswich, MA. Accessed November 3, 2013. Choi, J., Johnson, D. W., & Johnson, R. (2011). The Roots of Social Dominance: Aggression, Prosocial Behavior, and Social Interdependence. Journal Of Educational Research, 140(6), 442-454, doi:10.1080/0022067.2010.514689 Cokely, T. (2012, October 11). Olweus bullying prevention kickoff video. YouTube. Retrieved from website: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=sDWWGeLKgpY Fanti, K. A., & Kimonis, E. R. (2013). Dimensions of juvenile psychopathy distinguish “bullie,” “bully-victims,” and “victims”. Psychology Of Violence, 3(4), 396-409. Doi:10.1037/a0033951
    • References Gottfredson, G. D., & Gottfredson, D. C. (1985), Victimization in schools. Plenum Press, New York. Johnstone, M., Munn, P., & Edwards, L. (1991). Action against bullying: Drawing from experience. Council for Research Education. Edinburgh, Scotland: Scottish Kikkawa, M. (1987). Teachers' opinions and treatments for bully/victim problems among students in junior and senior high schools: Results of a fact-finding survey. Journal of Human Development, 23, 25-30. Kljakovic, M., Scheib, E., Nutter, O. (2011). The joint development of traditional bullying and victimization with cyber bullying and victimization of adolescence. Journal of Child Psychology & Psychiatry, 22(2). 301-309. Doi:10.1111/j.15327795.2011.00764.x
    • References National Centre Against Bullying, (2010). Childhood Development’s Building Respectful and Safe Schools identifies four types of bullying. Retrieved from website: http://www.ncab.org.au/fourkindsofbullying/ Newman, D. A., Horne, A. M., & Bartolomucci, L. (2000). Bully busters: A teacher's manual for helping bullies, victims, and bystanders. Champaign, IL: Research Press. Office of the Education Ombuds [website], (2012). Prevent Bullying, Harassment and Intimidation in Your School. Washington State, Office of Education Ombuds. Retrieved from website: http://www.governor.wa.gov/oeo/bullying/educators.asp Olweus, D. (1978). Aggression in the schools: Bullies and whipping boys. Washington, DC: Hemisphere Ortega, R., Elipe, P., Mora-Merchan, J. A., Genta, M., Brighi, A., Guariri, A., & Tippett, N. (2012). The emotional impact of bullying and cyber bullying on victims. Aggressive Behavior, 38(5), 342-356. Doi: 10.1002/ab.21440
    • References Petrosino, A., Guckenburg, S., DeVoe, J., and Hanson, T. (2010). What characteristics of bullying, bullying victims, and schools are associated with increased reporting of bullying to school officials? Issues & Answers Report, REL 2010– No. 092 Retrieved from website: http://ies.ed.gov/ncee/edlabs/regions/northeast/pdf/REL_2010092.pdf Roybal, J. (2013, November 9). Interviewed a school resource officer in a junior high school in Cheyenne Wyoming. Walden University, Group D, File Exchange. Shakoor, S., Happe, F., & Arsenault, L. (2012). A prospective longitudinal study of children’s theory of mind and adolescent involvement in bullying. Journal of Psychology & Psychiatry, 53(3), 254-261. Riggio, R. E. PhD. (2013). Bullying does long-term damage. Therapy Today, American Psychology Association 24(7), 5.
    • References Swearer, S. PhD. (2010, August 2). Bullying: What parents, teachers can do to stop it. American Psychology Association. Retrieved from: http://www.apa.org/news/press/releases/2010/04/bullying.aspx Wilson, A. (Ed.). (1991). The golden rule. In World scripture: A comparative anthology of sacred texts(pp.114–115). St. Paul, MN: Paragon House.
    • Helpful Resources Penning, S., Bhagwanjee, A., &Govendar, K. (2010). Bullying boys: The traumatic effects of bullying on male adolescent learners. Journal of Child Health & Adolescent Mental Health,22(2), 131-143. Doi: 10.2989/17280533.2010.528580 Mikulak, A. (2013). Far from being harmless: The effects of bust last long into adulthood. Association for Psychological Science. www.pbskids.org www.youtube.com www.Stopbullyingnow.com www.bullyingstatistics.org www.stopbullying.gov
    • News Media Photo Resources Associated Press, (2013, October 15). 2 Girls charged with felony stalking in Rebecca Sedwick case. Newser [online]. Retrieved from website: http://www.newser.com/story/175917/2-girls-arrested-after-bullied-girl-killsherself.html Evans, B. (2013, October, 2). One in five young people suffer 'extreme cyber-bullying' every day with Facebook accounting for more than half of the abuse. Daily Mail. United Kingdom. Retrieved from website: http://www.dailymail.co.uk/news/article2441239/1-5-young-people-suffer-extreme-cyber-bullying-day-Facebook-accountinghalf.html Fujita, A. (2012, July 6). Kids and laughing teachers bullied suicide teen. ABC News [website]. Retrieved from website: http://abcnews.go.com/blogs/headlines/2012/07/kids-andlaughing-teachers-bullied-suicide-teen/
    • News Media Photo Resources Gastaldo, E. (2013, April 17). Lanza beaten by Sandy Hook classmates: Source. Newser [website]. Retrieved from website: http://www.newser.com/story/166368/lanza-beaten-by-sandy-hookclassmates-source.html Harding, M. & Togneri, C. (2013, November 15). Pittsburgh school shooting update: Alleged bullied student behind gunfire. The Pittsburgh Tribune-Review. Retrieved from website: http://www.securityinfowatch.com/news/11234288/mother-of-teen-shootersays-her-son-feared-for-his-safety Mungin, L. (2012, October, 12). Bullied Canadian teen leaves behind chilling YouTube video. CNN [online]. Retrieved from website: http://www.cnn.com/2012/10/12/world/americas/canada-teen-bullying/
    • News Media Photo Resources Murphy, S. (2010, November 29). Specialists say bullies also need attention: Accused teenager at Groton School committed suicide. Boston News [online]. Retrieved from website: http://www.boston.com/news/local/massachusetts/articles/2010/11/29/expel ing_accused_bullies_is_not_the_answer_specialists_say/ Wong, C. (2011, December 4). Jonah Mowry, bullied gay teen, reveals fear, suicide attempts in brave clip (video). Huffington Post. Retrieved from website: http://www.huffingtonpost.com/2011/12/04/jonah-mowry-bullied-teenvideo_n_1127903.html