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    How data informs decision making 2 How data informs decision making 2 Presentation Transcript

    • How Data Informs Decision Making
    • Decisions … Decisions Think of a decision you made today.
    • How did you decide? •  We use some form of data to make every decision we make. •  Maybe you flipped a coin to decide between Subway and A&W.
    • Can We do THIS? notebook.stc.org
    • Why do we use data? •  We use data so that our decisions move us efficiently in the right direction.
    • Success Criteria By the end of this seminar ...
    • www.cloudtweaks.com I can describe theories, models and strategies for effective decision making and problem
    • www.adexchanger.com I can use data to determine effective strategies to improve student learning.
    • www.nuxeo.com I can communicate school data to describe school needs and strengths (including school improvement plan).I
    • www.ocdqblog.com I can use data to effectively establish professional learning communities.
    • scienceblogs.com I can describe how to create an environment that is conducive to using data effectively to improve student achievement.
    • Where are we now? Put a unique logo, nickname or symbol on each of your post-its so you can recognize it. Place a post-it on the rubric to indicate where you think you are now for each learning goal. We will revisit this data wall at the end on the seminar.
    • Types of Data What data should I use to guide my decisions?
    • Types of Data All DDDM processes depend upon high-quality data. The perception of low data credibility is one of the greatest threats to DDDM; doubts about whether data actually reflect students’ knowledge or alignment with the curriculum have an effect on whether educators will buy-in to the process or make use of the data for decisions (Ingram, Louis, & Schroeder, 2004).
    • What sources of data do we use in education? Type http://padlet.com/wall/typesofdata into the address bar on your browser. Working in groups of 2-3,brainstorm the sources of data that we use in education. Please keep each source as a separate post.
    • Types of Data •  Input •  Process •  Outcome •  Satisfaction
    • Input Data What we are starting with. •  Student Demographics •  Behavioural Indicators (Suspension and Attendance)
    • Process Data What’s going on in our school? •  Instructional strategies •  Collaborative Inquiry
    • Outcome Data How are our students doing? •  EQAO •  Pass Rates •  Grad Rates
    • Satisfaction Data Opinions from teachers, students,parents and community
    • Classify the Data Please go back to the Padlet. Drag the data sources to the correct data type.
    • Why is output data so important?
    • Why is output data so important? How could we use other types of data to improve our decision making?
    • SCDSB Diagnostic Assessments
    • Abraca-­‐data  and  school   leadership   The  condi3ons  that  promote   effec3ve  data  use  
    • Developing  the  school  culture   •  More  and  more  data  is  available  to  schools   •  The  intelligent  use  of  data  affects  all   professionals  involved  in  educa3on   •  We  cannot  go  back  to  the  days                                    when   decisions  were  made  on          hunches.   http://www.influx.com.br/blog/2012/02/28/o-que-
    • http://setandbma.wordpress.com/2012/02/02/bigdata/
    • http://blog.kissmetrics.com/launch-a-new-website/
    • •  Researchers  have  found  that  much  of  what   passes  as  «  evidence-­‐based  »  decision  making   is  in  fact  based  on  our  own  beliefs  and   assump3ons….about  what  works  and  what   doesn’t.  
    • Data  can  poten*ally  lead  to  overload   and  confusion  (Fullan  2006)   http://www.techweekeurope.co.uk/news/gartner-sees-2011-inflection-point-for-data-warehousing-21964
    • How  can  educa3onal  leaders  find  a  line   through  the  evidence  on  data  that  will   support  our  professional  prac3ce  and   help  us  take  advantage  of  the  poten3al   of  using  data?  
    • What  is  data  culture?   “a  Data  culture  is  a  learning  environment  within  a   school  or  district  that    includes  a8tudes,  values,  goals,   norms  of  behaviour,  and  prac*ces,  accompanied  by  an   explicit  vision  for  data  use  by  leadership,  that   characterize  a  group’s  apprecia*on  for  the  importance   and  power  that  data  can  bring  to  the  decision-­‐making   process.”  (Hamilton,  Halverson,  Jackdson,  Mandinach,  Supovits  and  Wayman,   2009)  
    • What  is  Data  Literacy?   •  The  ability  to  ask  and  answer  ques3ons  about   collec3ng,  analyzing,  and  making  sense  of  data   •  We  need  data  literacy  as  a  characteris3c  of  a   data-­‐driven  school  culture  
    • Data  in  the  classroom  
    • •  In  today’s  “knowledge  society”  evidence,  data   and  informa*on  have  become  a  cri*cal   elements  in  decision  making.  (Earl  and  Katz  2006)   •  Professional  Accountability   •  Should  not  be  viewed  as  a  judgment,  but  as  a   tool  educators  can  use  to  understand  the   current  situa3on  and  devise  a  reasonable   course  of  ac3on.  
    • Instruc3onal  prac3ce   •  Using  data  is  an  insight  about  student   progress  and  is  a  logical  way  to  monitor   con3nuous  improvement  and  tailor   instruc3on  to  the  needs  of  each  student.   http://keepitsimplenow.com/2012/03/are-you-accountable-for-your-clutter/
    • School  effec3veness   •  Effec3ve  use  of  data  is  one  of  the  big  key  factors   iden3fied  in  a  review  on  school  effec3veness   conducted  by  the  EQAO.  This  is  what  the  review   has  to  say:   –  At  the  classroom  level,  in  effec3ve  schools,  teachers  monitor  student  progress  on  a  regular  basis  to   provide  both  differen3ated  learning  experiences  and  appropriate  support  to  meet  student  needs   –  At  the  school  level,  effec3ve  leaders  ensure  that  both  outcome  and  process  data  are  made  available   for  use  by  school  staff  and  assessment  data  are  integral  to  monitoring  the  adainment  of  school   goals.  
    • The  role  of  the  school  leaders   The  principal  plays  a  key  role  in:     ✓ establishing  the  purpose  for  data  use   ✓ Providing  3me  for  working  with  data   ✓ Providing  opportuni3es  to  work  with            others   ✓ Provides  access  to  experts   http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Principal_Skinner
    • Studies  show:   •  Principals  who  are  most  successful  in  using   data  are  those  who  engage  their  school  staff   in  collabora3ve  decision  making   •  Teachers  will  embrace  a  data  ini3a3ve  if     –  it  is  well  implemented   –  Relevant  to  the  learning  needs  of  students   –  Useful  in  informing  teaching  prac3ce  
    • Four  main  dimensions  of  successful   leadership  prac3ce  in  using  data   http://michellehslee.blogspot.ca/
    • 1.  Providing  formal  and  informal  structures  to  support   data  use.   2.  Focus  on  conversa3ons  and  instruc3onal   improvement.   3.  Implement  data  purposefully  so  that:   a)  Teachers  see  the  connec3ons   b)  Professional  development   4.  Make  3me  to:   a)  Align  goals   b)  Offer  professional  learning  
    • Condi3ons  that  promote  effec3ve  data   use  in  schools   •  Make  data  a  part  of  an  ongoing  cycle  of  instruc3onal  improvement   •  Teach  students  to  examine  their  own  data  and  set  learning  goals   •  Establish  a  clear  vision  for            school-­‐wide  data  use   •  Provide  supports  that  foster  a          data-­‐driven  culture   •  Develop  and  maintain  a            district-­‐wide  data  system   http://www.pinterest.com/ginger_watkins/ assessment/
    • Strategies  for  Success:   Overcoming  Key  Challenges  
    •   Challenge  one:  Fear  and  Mistrust  of   Data  and  Evalua3on   Fear  of  what?  Data’s  capacity  to  reveal  strength   and  weakness,  failure  and  success.   “By  ignoring  data,  we  promote     inac*on  and  inefficiency.”(Schmoker  1999)   http://www.123rf.com/stock-photo/action.html
    • Challenge  two:   Building  a  Culture  of  Data  Use   •  Develop  an  inquiry  habit  of  mind   •  Become  data  literate   •  Create  a  culture  of  inquiry  in  their  school   community  
    • Challenge  Three:   Too  Much  Data  and  Too  Lidle  Time   •  Sejng  aside  3me  for  data  use   •  Building  a  culture  that  focuses  on   improvement  rather  than  blame   •  Professional  development  and  support   http://www.gougeoninsurance.com/4-easy-steps-toeffective-staff-training/
    • Data  Wise  Improvement  Plan   http://www.uknow.gse.harvard.edu/decisions/ DD2-4.html
    •     Rear-­‐view  mirror  effect   (White  2009)   •  Student  achievement  data  alone  are  not  sufficient   to  guide  decision  making   http://www.crystalgraphics.com/powerpictures/ Image.Search.Details.asp?product=cg1p5446219c
    • Collabora3ve  Inquiry  as  a   Vehicle for  Using  Data  
    • “Leaders  who  use  data  well  believe  that  schools   can  make  a  difference.  Their  model  of  educa*on   change  is  focused  on  changing  schools  to  help   ensure  beIer  services  and  beIer  learning  for  all   students.”     hIp://www.edu.gov.on.ca/eng/policyfunding/leadership/IdeasIntoAc*onBulle*n5.pdf  
    • In  this  model,  inquiry  and  professional  learning  are  inseparable:       •  The  cycle  begins  with  student  learning  needs:  “What  knowledge  and  skills  do  our   students  need?”   •  Once  these  are  understood,  the  teacher  moves  to  an  explicit  ar3cula3on  of  the   rela3onship  between  current  teaching  prac3ce  and  the  student’s  learning   requirements:  “What  knowledge  and  skills  do  we  need  as  professionals  within  this   ini3a3ve?”   •  A  course  for  professional  learning  is  charted  that  will  both  “deepen  professional   knowledge  and  translate  into  changes  in  prac3ce.”   •  As  prac3ces  change  and  students  are  beder  served,  teachers  move  on  to  new   considera3ons  for  student  learning  needs  and  proceed  through  the  cycle  again  to   engage  students  in  new  learning  experiences.     •  The  cycle  begins  again.         hIp://www.edu.gov.on.ca/eng/policyfunding/leadership/IdeasIntoAc*onBulle*n5.pdf  
    • 2 minute brainstormIn your experience, what has been the focus, or inquiry question of some PLC’s/collaborative inquiry/action research that you have participated been? www.todaysmeet.com/PQP    
    • Secondary  SIPSA  Planning     Staff  Website:     • School  Improvement  Planning  tool     • Compass  for  Success  (cognos)     • Student  Repor3ng  area  –  various  reports  
    • Elementary  School  Improvement  Planning   EQAO:     -­‐  Breakdown  for  R,  L1,  L2,  etc.  to  compare  shins/trends  in  the  curve   demonstra3ng  movement  toward  L3   -­‐  Self-­‐iden3fied  FNMI   -­‐  IEP   CASI:  principal  can  request  from  specific  grades/classes   Report  Card  Data   School  Climate  Survey   Class  Profiles   Data  from  Student  Voice  ini3a3ves     Info  from  SEF  visits   Progressive  discipline  log     Audit  trails,  data  walls,  PLC  minutes  and  progress    
    • Class  –  Specific  Data  for  Teachers   My  Classroom  Data  (staff  website,  teaching,  assessment  &   evalua3on,  student  repor3ng)     Student  Success  Database       Grade  8  Transi3ons  Profile     Learning  Style  surveys  
    • What conclusions could be made from this data? What are possible factors that could have influenced this data? What other questions would you ask?
    • hIp://www.edu.gov.on.ca/eng/policyfunding/leadership/IdeasIntoAc*onBulle*n5.pdf  
    • How  do  you  fund  a  PLC?   Schools  asked  to  set  aside  some  school  basic  budget     PLC’s  organized  and  coordinated  through  Ed  Centre   ini3a3ves  (NM’s)     SSI  –  9  secondary  schools,  ministry  funded       Teacher  Learning  and  Leadership  Program  –  1  secondary,  2   elementary,  ministry  funded      
    • Policies  and  Regula3ons   Children’s  Law  Reform  Act   Educa3on  Act   Municipal  Freedom  of  Informa3on  and  Protec3on  of   Privacy  Act   Personal  Health  Informa3on  Protec3on  Act,  2004   Ontario  Student  Record  (OSR)  Guideline  2000     SCDSB   Policy  –  Management  of  Personal  Informa3on  2197   Board  APM  A1450  –  Management  of  Personal  Informa3on  –  Student     Board  APM  A7610  –  Ontario  Student  Record  
    • Ac3vity   In groups, take your data and imagine you are about to create your School Improvement Plan for Student Achievement (SIPSA). After a quick look through; •  •  •  •  What areas may you focus on? What focus may some of your PLC’s take? What teachers would you invite to join in your PLC’s? What class data would you gather or ask teachers to bring to the PLC’s? •  Is there any data that doesn’t sit quite right? Perhaps an area that requires more digging?
    • Data’s Role in Effective Leadership Five Core Leadership Capacities: ➢ using data ➢ goal setting ➢ aligning resources with priorities ➢ engaging in courageous conversations ➢ promoting collaborative learning
    • Using Data supports the other Core Leadership Capacities http://www.edu.gov.on.ca/eng/policyfunding/leadership/IdeasIntoActionFall11.pdf
    • Using Data supports the other Core Leadership Capacities ➢ Helps set appropriate goals towards measurable achievement ➢ A quantifiable connection between resources used and school board priorities
    • Using Data supports the other Core Leadership Capacities ➢ Using collaborative methods, a data culture can ensure genuine, focused learning is promoted ➢ Using data allows for a factual foundation for courageous conversation to achieve goals
    • http://juliezolfo.com/eq-leader/
    • Using Data for Equity and Inclusion ➢ Data is used to support equity and inclusion ●  To improve literacy and teaching practices ●  To be informed of demographics of school population and align teaching and equity and inclusion practices with these demographics http://www.inverhills.edu/CampusLife/ MulticulturalAffairs.aspx
    • http://dilbert.com/strips/comic/2010-05-21/ http://dilbert.com/strips/comic/2010-05-21/
    • Using Data Supporting the OLF ➢ An effective leader uses data to improve skills, knowledge and attitudes for each domain of the OLF
    • Using Data Supporting the OLF Setting Directions Thinks strategically to build and communication a vision Eg. Using credit accumulation data to improve student success initiatives improving graduation rates Building Relationships and Developing People Demonstrates commitment to collaboration and shared leadership for school and board improvement Eg. The practice of action research for topics related to BIPSA
    • http://search.dilbert.com/search?w=data&x=0&y=0
    • Using Data Supporting the OLF Securing Accountability Knows and understands a range of evidence to support, monitor, evaluate and improve school performance Eg. Can analyze EQAO data to see trends and areas for improvement then implementing school practices to improve upon these
    • Let’s revisit our success criteria..
    • www.cloudtweaks.com I can describe theories, models and strategies for effective decision making and problem
    • www.adexchanger.com I can use data to determine effective strategies to improve student learning.
    • www.nuxeo.com I can communicate school data to describe school needs and strengths (including school improvement
    • www.ocdqblog.com I can use data to effectively establish professional learning communities.
    • scienceblogs.com I can describe how to create an environment that is conducive to using data effectively to improve student achievement.
    • Let’s revisit our success criteria...
    • Seminar Feedback http://m.socrative.com/student Join Room Number: calder Anonymous feedback
    • Resources - http://datafun.wikispaces.com Education World: Decision-Making For School Leaders: Five Tips http://bit.ly/18odwhA Ideas into Action - Using Data: Transforming Potential into Practice - http://bit.ly/1eVQUuK Ontario Leadership Framework. 2012. http://iel.immix.ca/storage/6/1380680958/SCHOOLLEVEL_LEADERSHIP_%282%29.pdf RAND Article - http://bit.ly/1bSLX89