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Holtet Videregående Skole
 

Holtet Videregående Skole

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Slides used with Holtet Videregående Skole on 16th August 2012

Slides used with Holtet Videregående Skole on 16th August 2012

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  • The evidence was collected from existing meta-analyses – the actual research that is the basis of the meta-analyses included published material and quality assured research papers and student projects (eg unpublished PhDs theses). John Hattie is constantly updating the meta-analyses so you may find slight variations in the effects across publications. The material in this workshop will be kept up to date and the effect size tables in the workbook will be accurate.
  • This slide represents the way that the multitude of assessment results can be compared once they are put into an effect size – and put onto a common scale. It is a way of taking different types of assessment results and making a common comparison.
  • So the point was to measure progress over time
  • This follows the previous activity where we now take some school systems/innovations/general practices and consider which ones have the biggest effects on student achievement. Clarify any queries around the meaning of some of these effects and what they mean. (p XXX)What effect do you think the following processes/systems/strategies/events have on student achievement – list them from the ones that have the greatest effect to the ones that have the least effect
  • This follows the previous activity where we now take some school systems/innovations/general practices and consider which ones have the biggest effects on student achievement. Clarify any queries around the meaning of some of these effects and what they mean. (p XXX)What effect do you think the following processes/systems/strategies/events have on student achievement – list them from the ones that have the greatest effect to the ones that have the least effect
  • Individualised InstructionBased on the idea that students are all unique and have individual needs, individualised instruction provides a programme of learning for each student.  The 0.22 effect size does not support the notion of individualised instruction as other research shows that students learn better when interacting with peers and when programs are adapted by teachers to suit individual needs within the classroom situation. Teachers are adept at managing classes of 30 or more students and have developed strategies to manage these large groups. Teaching test taking/coachingThere are a wide range of activities related to test preparation and there has been much research to correlate the effect of the activities on test scores. See VL pp 179 - 181 A related aspect of teaching test taking is where it may also have the effect of lowering student anxiety. Reducing anxiety has an effect size of 0.40.HomeworkThe overall effects of homework are positive but there are some important moderators. The key ones are that there is a greater positive effect of homework for high school students (0.59) than for elementary school students (0.04). Systems accountabilityInquiry based teachingInquiry based teaching methods have been mainly studied in the context of science. They includeopen- ended learning situations where students are not expected to come up with a ‘right’ answer but rather be involved in a process of observing, experimenting, exploration etc. Inquiry based learning is a current popular practice that is widely used in schools. There is a concern that novice learners may suffer unless the learning situation is scaffolded for them. There is a risk that in an unstructured learning environment that a learner who has little basic knowledge or skills in the areas of inquiry may have no effective way of managing the inquiry and that their learning may be harmed. In an inquiry based lesson we must provide effective support for all learners to have success.
  • The evidence was collected from existing meta-analyses – the actual research that is the basis of the meta-analyses included published material and quality assured research papers and student projects (eg unpublished PhDs theses). John Hattie is constantly updating the meta-analyses so you may find slight variations in the effects across publications. The material in this workshop will be kept up to date and the effect size tables in the workbook will be accurate.
  • The evidence was collected from existing meta-analyses – the actual research that is the basis of the meta-analyses included published material and quality assured research papers and student projects (eg unpublished PhDs theses). John Hattie is constantly updating the meta-analyses so you may find slight variations in the effects across publications. The material in this workshop will be kept up to date and the effect size tables in the workbook will be accurate.
  • The evidence was collected from existing meta-analyses – the actual research that is the basis of the meta-analyses included published material and quality assured research papers and student projects (eg unpublished PhDs theses). John Hattie is constantly updating the meta-analyses so you may find slight variations in the effects across publications. The material in this workshop will be kept up to date and the effect size tables in the workbook will be accurate.
  • Student expectations/self report gradesStudents who are able to articulate what their learning outcomes/test results might be (when they can self-report their grades) are more likely to be successful than other learners. The key premise is that when students know their learning so well they will be able to do this. These students will be engaged with their learning and be active participants in their learning. This links to the idea of building students who are assessment capable. They can answer the questions: Where am I going? How am I going? and where to next?Providing formative evaluationTeachers regularly receive formative evaluation about their teaching programmes and classroom practice through feedback and/or by looking at their student results. Teachers need to receive ongoing feedback about their teaching to improve student results. Micro teachingMicro teaching is where teachers examine aspects of a lesson, or group of lessons, by working with a colleague/s to look at specific aspects of their teaching. It may be questioning skills, teaching strategies etc. It may also involve videotaping a lesson and then examining an aspect of practice. Teachers need to receive ongoing feedback about their teaching to improve student results.

Holtet Videregående Skole Holtet Videregående Skole Presentation Transcript

  • James Nottingham, 16th Aug 2012 Engaging all students with visible learningChallengingLearning.comjames@p4c.com@JamesNottinghmFacebook.com/ChallengingLearning
  • 900+ Meta-analyses (covering 50,000+ studies) 2009 2011
  • Maths Percentage gains level An Effect SizeA common scale for measuring progress in student achievement
  • All studies used in the visible learning researchMeasured growth ordifferenceeg impact of feedbackeg boys vs girls
  • Graph representing the spread of effect sizes2500020000 No. of Effects15000100005000 0 Hinge point of 0.4
  • Rank these 10 effects a) Pupils frequently moving schools b) Computer assisted instruction c) Formative evaluation of teachers d) How pupils rate their teachers e) Homework f) Fewer pupils in each class g) Teachers’ subject knowledge h) Classroom discussion i) Matching learning styles j) Teacher-student relationships
  • c) Formative evaluation of teachers (0.90)d) How pupils rate their teachers (0.90)h) Classroom discussion (0.82)j) Teacher-student relationships (0.72)b) Computer assisted instruction (0.37)e) Homework (0.29)f) Fewer pupils in each class (0.21)i) Matching learning styles (0.17)g) Teachers’ subject knowledge (0.09)a) Pupils moving schools (-0.34)
  • Teachers’ subject knowledge (0.09)Professor David Starkey, CBE
  • Matching Learning Styles (0.17)
  • Rank Influence Studies Effects ES 91 Inquiry based teaching 205 420 .31 94 Homework 161 295 .29 98 Teaching test taking/coaching 275 372 .27109 Individualized instruction 638 1185 .22 Primary Schools 0.01 Secondary Schools 0.56
  • Top 75
  • Bottom 75
  • John Hattie Jamie Oliver
  • Visible Learning is intended to stimulate dialogueWhat questions do we haveabout the relative effects? What are self report grades? Why doesn’t class size matter much? Are we making effective progress with our innovations?
  • Don’t waste time on things that probably don’t matter much
  • Not everything countsNot everything that counts can be counted, and not everything that can be counted countsSign hanging inEinsteins office at Princeton
  • Top 75
  • Rank Influence Studies Effects ES 1 Assessment capable students 209 305 1.44 5 Providing formative evaluation 30 78 .90 6 Micro teaching 402 439 .88 10 Feedback 1310 2086 .75
  • Visible Learners (and leaders) accurately assessthemselves
  • Where am I going? How am I doing? What are my next steps?Three key questions for assessment capable students
  • Learning intentions and success criteria help identify where & howLearning Intentionso To find out what links the Vikings withNorth East EnglandSuccess Criteria Co-constructedo Know when and where the Vikings came fromo Identify names and places associated with the Vikingso Ask relevant questions
  • Why did they Gate AD 700 - 1100 attack Lindisfarne? Bairns Lad Tarn Vikings Thriding Norse Rape &language pillage Did they believe in Longships God? Dragon Horned ships helmets
  • Marzano – groups of 3 work best Informal Formal Long-term
  • Why did they Gate AD 700 - 1100 attack Lindisfarne? Bairns Captured Lad Yorvik in 866 Tarn Vikings Thriding Norse Rape & language pillage King Cnut Did they believe inruled England Longships God? from 1016 Dragon Horned helmets Gods included ships Odin, Thor, Fri Eric Bloodaxe gg & Loki Dead warriors went died in 954 to Valhalla
  • Sharp pencil ✔Title ✔Date ✔Capital Letters ✔Full stops ✗Describe the character ✔Describe the place ✗First, next, then, finally ✔And, but, so, while, because ✗Fun action words (bounded, sprang) ✔Rhyming words (loud, proud, crowd) ✔
  • Marking sheet for history essays (Frank Egan)Introduction Conclusion 4+ sentences  3+ sentences Proposition stated  Summation Outline of narrative  Proof of proposition Context of topic  Specific reference to assess/evaluate as last sentenceBody of essay Literacy 3+ paragraphs  Spelling accuracy 6+ facts per paragraph  Grammar structures Inter-relationships “I can actually see how to Argument is relevant improve, it’s obvious.” Quote with source given
  • Learning Detectives
  • Download slides from …www.challenginglearning.com @JamesNottinghm
  • Which factors influence student-teacher relationships? A. A focus on learning 0.47 B. Warmth 0.68 C. Encouragement of higher order thinking skills 0.61 D. Adapting to differences 0.41 E. Being genuine 0.29 F. Non-directivity 0.74 G. Beliefs about the students 0.10 H. Empathy 0.68 Cornelius-White notes that students who do not wish to come toschool or who dislike school do so primarily because they dislike their teacher.” (Hattie, 2009, p119)