Brighton Secondary

607 views
478 views

Published on

Slides used on 5th March with Brighton Secondary and Beaumaris North Primary in Melbourne

Published in: Education, Technology
0 Comments
0 Likes
Statistics
Notes
  • Be the first to comment

  • Be the first to like this

No Downloads
Views
Total views
607
On SlideShare
0
From Embeds
0
Number of Embeds
3
Actions
Shares
0
Downloads
6
Comments
0
Likes
0
Embeds 0
No embeds

No notes for slide
  • The story of the Pig of Happiness has been scanned into a separate PPT. So, if it’s possible to create a link here that will start up another PPT (just put in a dummy PPT for now) to save me than having to come out of this PPT and going into another PPT, then that would be great.
  • The evidence was collected from existing meta-analyses – the actual research that is the basis of the meta-analyses included published material and quality assured research papers and student projects (eg unpublished PhDs theses). John Hattie is constantly updating the meta-analyses so you may find slight variations in the effects across publications. The material in this workshop will be kept up to date and the effect size tables in the workbook will be accurate.
  • Brighton Secondary

    1. 1. Not everything counts Not everything that counts can be counted, and not everything that can be counted counts Sign hanging in Einstein's office at Princeton
    2. 2. www.challenginglearning.com
    3. 3. Learning how to learn Alfred Binet 1857 - 1911 ‘What (students) should learn first is not the subjects ordinarily taught, however important they may be; they should be given lessons of will, of attention, of discipline; before exercises in grammar, they need to be exercised in mental orthopaedics; in a word they must learn how to learn.’
    4. 4. Alfred Binet, creator of the first IQ test Alfred Binet 1857 - 1911 ‘Some recent philosophers have given their moral approval to the deplorable verdict that an individual’s intelligence is a fixed quantity, one which cannot be augmented. We must protest and act against this brutal pessimism … it has no foundation whatsoever.’
    5. 5. Number of words heard by children A child in a welfare-dependent family hears on average 616 words an hour A child in a working-class home hears on average 1,251 words an hour A child in a professional home hears on average 2,153 words an hour Number of words spoken by the time children are 3 500 700 1100 Hart & Risley, 1995
    6. 6. By the time they start school Some children start school knowing 6,000 words. Others, just 500 words. Rowntree Foundation news.bbc.co.uk/1/hi/magazin e/8013859.stm
    7. 7. A new curriculum? “The best schools design learning for their pupils and then cross check against the national expectations to see they have done right by the pupils in terms of the agreed entitlement for all the nation’s children.” “It doesn’t really matter what comes from government; how it is packaged, what it contains. In the end, the curriculum is the one that children in schools meet day in, day out.” Mick Waters ex-head of QCA and now president of the Curriculum Foundation
    8. 8. An Ethos for Learning Not all of our questions answered … … but all of our answers questioned
    9. 9. The Learning Challenge ClarityConfusion 1. Concept 2. Conflict 2 1
    10. 10. ANALYSE ANTICIPATE APPLY CAUSAL- LINK CHOOSE CLASSIFY COMPARE CONNECT CONTRAST DECIDE DEFINE DESCRIBE DETERMINE DISCUSS ELABORATE ESTIMATE EVALUATE EXEMPLIFY EXPLORE GENERALISE GIVE EXAMPLES GIVE REASONS GROUP HYPOTHESI SE IDENTIFY INFER INTERPRET ORGANISE PARAPHRA SE PREDICT QUESTION RANK REPRESEN T RESPOND SEQUENCE SIMPLIFY SHOW HOW SOLVE SORT SUMMARISE SUPPORT TEST VERIFY VISUALISE A selection of thinking skills
    11. 11. Attitudes  Curiosity  Desire to succeed  Open-mindedness  Resilience  Self-Regulation Knowledge  Facts  Figures  Concepts  Ideas Skills  Intellectual  Social  Communicative  Physical The ASK model – Attitudes, Skills & Knowledge S A K
    12. 12. Facts and Concepts Fact Paris is the capital of France Concept Capital cities Knowledge Understanding
    13. 13. Recent Demo Lesson Concepts What is a toy? (5 year olds) Was the mouse telling lies? (7 year olds) What happens when you die? (11 year olds) What’s the difference between tragedy and romance? (14 year olds) What is culture? (15 year olds) Is zero the same as nothing? (17 year olds)
    14. 14. Example question stems What is (difference different from?) What if (everyone was extraordinary?) Always/never (know?) How do we know (what love is?) Why do we (say young people don’t know what love is?) What is the difference (between ordinary & extraordinary?) Is it possible (to always be happy?) When (is happiness a bad thing?) Who (decides what the natural way is?) Can we (ever know for sure?)
    15. 15. If A = B then Does B = A? Friend Trust Trust Friend For example … Wobblers (If A = B)
    16. 16. More videos of challenge Videos on: jamesnottingham.co.uk p4c.com Youtube.com/jabulani4
    17. 17. Colliding concepts Truth and Opinion Biodegradable and Reusable Hero and Villain Happy and Content Dreams and Daydreams Decision and Order Child and Youth Lies and Make-believe Toys and Books Karma and Revenge Worked examples at www.p4c.com
    18. 18. Eureka moments come from challenge ClarityConfusion 1. Concept 2. Conflict 3. Construct 2 1 3
    19. 19. Kriticos = able to make judgements Critical Thinking Comes from the Greek, Kriticos Meaning: able to make judgements Source: www.etymonline.com
    20. 20. Engage pupils by engaging their minds Stealing is wrong Robin Hood was right
    21. 21. Developed during World War II, MBTI is a personality indicator designed to identify personal preferences In a similar way to left or right-handedness, the MBTI principle is that individuals also find certain ways of thinking and acting easier than others Sensing Introversion Judging Thinking Intuition Extroversion Perceiving Feeling Evidence Gut feeling Think to talk Talk to think Definite Possible Logic/Reason Empathy Myers Briggs Type Indicator (MBTI)
    22. 22. 900+ meta-analyses 50,000+ studies and 240+ million students What is the typical influence on achievement?
    23. 23. Rank Influence Studies Effects ES 1 Assessment capable students 209 305 1.44 5 Providing formative evaluation 30 78 .90 10 Feedback 1310 2086 .75 Top 75
    24. 24. Other ways to challenge Ready Fire Aim What’s the point? Learning Intentions Success Criteria Initial instruction First attempts by children Formative assessment and a focus on progress
    25. 25. Learning Intentions o To find out what links the Vikings with North East England Success Criteria o Know when and where the Vikings came from o Identify names and places associated with the Vikings o Ask relevant questions Ready: Learning Intentions & Success Criteria
    26. 26. Vikings Rape & pillage Horned helmets Longships Norse language AD 700 - 1100 Why did they attack Lindisfarne? Dragon ships Captured Yorvik in 866 Dead warriors went to Valhalla Eric Bloodaxe died in 954 Gods included Odin, Thor, Frigg & Loki King Cnut ruled England from 1016 Did they believe in God? Gate Bairns Lad Tarn Thriding
    27. 27. Learning Detectives
    28. 28. Using “aim” to move students into the wobble zone
    29. 29. Learning Intentions o Understand the process of hazard analysis and how it applies to food Success Criteria o Use technical vocabulary o Identify a wide range of types of hazard o Communicate coherently Year 6 – All about food
    30. 30. Praise that discourages getting in the pit includes … Clever girl! Gifted musician Brilliant mathematician Bright boy Top of the class! By far the best
    31. 31. Mueller and Dweck, 1998 In six studies, 7th grade students were given a series of nonverbal IQ tests. The effects of different types of praise
    32. 32. Intelligence praise “Wow, that’s a really good score. You must be smart at this.” Process praise “Wow, that’s a really good score. You must have tried really hard.” Control-group praise “Wow, that’s a really good score.” Mueller and Dweck, 1998
    33. 33. 4.5 5 5.5 6 6.5 Trial 1 Trial 3 Effort Praise Control Praise Intelligence Praise Number of problems solved on a 3rd test
    34. 34. Boys get 8 times more criticism than girls
    35. 35. The effects of praise Swimming “You do your best swimming when you concentrate and try your best to do what Chris is asking you to do” Ballet “You’re the best ballerina in the world!”
    36. 36. 1.Good girl; 2.How extraordinary; 3.Great effort; 4.Outstanding performance; 5.What a scientist you are; 6.Unbelievable work; 7.You’re a genius; 8.You're getting better; 9.Clever boy 10.You should be proud; 11.You've got it; 12.You're special; 13. Very talented; 14. You've outdone yourself; 15. What a great listener; 16. You came through; 17.You’re very artistic; 18.Keep up the good work; 19.It's everything I hoped for; 20.Perfect; 21.A+ Work; 22.You're a shining star; 23.Inspired; 24.You're #1; 25.You're very responsible; 26.You're very talented; 27.Spectacular work; 28.Great discovery; 29.You're amazing; 30.What a great idea; 31.Well worked through; 32.Very thoughtful; 33.You figured it out; 34.Top of the class; 35. You make me smile
    37. 37. @JamesNottinghm James Nottingham Challenging Learning slideshare.net/jabulani4 james@p4c.com jamesnottingham.co.uk Follow up

    ×