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Aranmore College
Aranmore College
Aranmore College
Aranmore College
Aranmore College
Aranmore College
Aranmore College
Aranmore College
Aranmore College
Aranmore College
Aranmore College
Aranmore College
Aranmore College
Aranmore College
Aranmore College
Aranmore College
Aranmore College
Aranmore College
Aranmore College
Aranmore College
Aranmore College
Aranmore College
Aranmore College
Aranmore College
Aranmore College
Aranmore College
Aranmore College
Aranmore College
Aranmore College
Aranmore College
Aranmore College
Aranmore College
Aranmore College
Aranmore College
Aranmore College
Aranmore College
Aranmore College
Aranmore College
Aranmore College
Aranmore College
Aranmore College
Aranmore College
Aranmore College
Aranmore College
Aranmore College
Aranmore College
Aranmore College
Aranmore College
Aranmore College
Aranmore College
Aranmore College
Aranmore College
Aranmore College
Aranmore College
Aranmore College
Aranmore College
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Aranmore College

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Slides used on 14th March with Aranmore College, Perth, WA

Slides used on 14th March with Aranmore College, Perth, WA

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  • The evidence was collected from existing meta-analyses – the actual research that is the basis of the meta-analyses included published material and quality assured research papers and student projects (eg unpublished PhDs theses). John Hattie is constantly updating the meta-analyses so you may find slight variations in the effects across publications. The material in this workshop will be kept up to date and the effect size tables in the workbook will be accurate.
  • This slide represents the way that the multitude of assessment results can be compared once they are put into an effect size – and put onto a common scale. It is a way of taking different types of assessment results and making a common comparison.
  • Changing School timetablingThis research focused on the effects of modifying the school year to shorten the summer break while not increasing the length of the school year. The average effect size for favouring modified calendars is small. Teacher Subject Matter KnowledgeThere is not a large body of evidence to support the claim that teacher subject matter knowledge has a significant and related effect on student achievement. This finding seems contradictory to what we might believe to be true. As a result John Hattie has looked more closely at the possible reasons and purports that the reason may be that many teachers are teaching at surface level only. If this is the case then deep subject matter knowledge is not important for surface level teaching.GenderThe difference in achievement between genders is minor and there is more variance within groups of boys and groups of girls than there is between them. As well as there being very few achievement differences there are also very few differences across other domains i.e. communication, social and personality variables. Males outperform girls in motor performance and social aggression and females outperform males in agreeableness.Ability GroupingIn the USA data shows that about 86% of students in public schools are placed in tracked classes. The outcomes can be considered both in terms of achievement and equity. Tracking has minimal effects on student outcomes and profound negative equity effects. Low track classes have been described as ‘deadening, non-educational environments’. Oakes, (2005) VL p90. Qualitative evidence shows that low track classes are more fragmented, less engaging and taught by fewer well trained teachers (VL p91). 
  • Changing School timetablingThis research focused on the effects of modifying the school year to shorten the summer break while not increasing the length of the school year. The average effect size for favouring modified calendars is small. Teacher Subject Matter KnowledgeThere is not a large body of evidence to support the claim that teacher subject matter knowledge has a significant and related effect on student achievement. This finding seems contradictory to what we might believe to be true. As a result John Hattie has looked more closely at the possible reasons and purports that the reason may be that many teachers are teaching at surface level only. If this is the case then deep subject matter knowledge is not important for surface level teaching.GenderThe difference in achievement between genders is minor and there is more variance within groups of boys and groups of girls than there is between them. As well as there being very few achievement differences there are also very few differences across other domains i.e. communication, social and personality variables. Males outperform girls in motor performance and social aggression and females outperform males in agreeableness.Ability GroupingIn the USA data shows that about 86% of students in public schools are placed in tracked classes. The outcomes can be considered both in terms of achievement and equity. Tracking has minimal effects on student outcomes and profound negative equity effects. Low track classes have been described as ‘deadening, non-educational environments’. Oakes, (2005) VL p90. Qualitative evidence shows that low track classes are more fragmented, less engaging and taught by fewer well trained teachers (VL p91). 
  • Transcript

    • 1. Growing to Learn; Learning to Grow Aranmore Catholic College, March 2012 „We now accept the fact that learning is a lifelong process of keeping abreast of change. And the most pressing task is to teach people how to learn.‟ Peter Drucker, 1909–2005 (Described by Business Week as ‘the man who invented management’)jamesnottingham.co.ukchallenginglearning.com
    • 2. www.challenginglearning.com
    • 3. “Some men are born great, some achievegreatness and others have greatness thrust upon them” Malvolio, Twelfth Night
    • 4. Nature vs NurtureFrancis Galton was the firstto use the term “Nature vs.Nurture”In 1854, he published anarticle exploring whethersocial behaviour was aresult of genetics orenvironment (eg. arecriminals born or created?)Galton was a cousin ofCharles Darwin
    • 5. What has made these two people successful?Oscar Pistorius Usain Bolt
    • 6. Did they develop their genius or were they born with it?Leonardo da Vinci Steve Jobs
    • 7. Are their talents innate or incremental?Joanne Kathleen Rowling Sally Morgan
    • 8. Were these two born to be entrepreneurs?Rupert Murdoch Richard Branson
    • 9. Mozart – a child prodigy?
    • 10. What level of plasticity do our brains have?
    • 11. Nature vs Nurture?
    • 12. Learning how to learn „What (students) should learn first is not thesubjects ordinarily taught, however important they may be; they should be given lessons of will, of attention, of discipline; before exercises in grammar, they need to be exercised in mental orthopaedics; in a word they must learn how to learn.‟ Alfred Binet 1857 - 1911
    • 13. Intelligence is not fixed (Binet, 1909) „Some recent philosophers have given their moral approval to the deplorable verdict that an individual‟s intelligence is a fixed quantity, one which cannot be augmented. We must protest and act against this brutal pessimism … it has no foundation whatsoever.‟ Alfred Binet 1857 - 1911
    • 14. Independent and Intuitive and Sharp and quick- intellectual Aquarius sympathetic Pisces witted AriesLike to be different Vague & careless Procrastinator Strongly Very versatile and Shrewd and determined Taurus adaptable Gemini cautious Cancer Self indulgent Inconsistent Indecisive & moodyBroad-minded and Practical and Easygoing and expansive Leo diligent Virgo sociable LibraBossy & intolerant Overcritical & harsh Prone to daydream Powerful and Intellectual and Very disciplined and passionate Scorpio philosophical Sagittarius focused Capricorn Obsessive Tactless & restless Fatalistic
    • 15. Number of words heard by childrenA child in a welfare-dependent family hears on average616 words an hour 500A child in a working-class home hears on average 1,251words an hour 700A child in a professional home hears on average 2,153words an hour 1100Number of words spoken by the time children are 3Hart &Risley, 1995
    • 16. By the time they start school Some children start school knowing 6,000 words. Others, just 500 words. Rowntree Foundation http://news.bbc.co.uk/1/hi/ma gazine/8013859.stm
    • 17. From The Brain RulesBy John Medina
    • 18. Nature vs Nurture?
    • 19. We all have beliefs about intelligence & talents People who believe intelligence comes mainly from nature have a „fixed‟ mindset People who believe intelligence comes mainly from nurture have a „growth‟ mindset Professor Carol Dweck, Stanford
    • 20. Fixed Mindset Growth Mindset Intelligence and ability are fixed  Intelligence and ability can be Nature determines intelligence grown & improved  Nurture plays a big rolePriority Prove myself Priority Succeed with little effort, as this Improve myselfproves I am clever  To learn as much as possibleResponse to Difficulties Response to Difficulties Feel inferior or incapable  Feel inspiredto try new Try guessing the answers or strategiescopying others  Seek advice& coachingMotto Motto If you have to try, you must be  No pain, no gainstupid
    • 21. Then in school, we use terms such as …Gifted, Bright Special Needs Average
    • 22. Self-fulfilling prophecies
    • 23. Praise that encourages a fixed mindset includes … Clever girl! Gifted musician Brilliant mathematician Bright boy Top of the class! By far the best
    • 24. The effects of different types of praiseMueller andDweck, 1998In six studies, 7thgrade studentswere given aseries ofnonverbal IQtests.
    • 25. Mueller and Dweck, 1998Intelligence praise“Wow, that‟s a really good score. You must be smart at this.”Process praise“Wow, that‟s a really good score. You must have tried reallyhard.”Control-group praise“Wow, that‟s a really good score.”
    • 26. Number of problems solved on a 3rd test6.5 6 Effort Praise5.5 Control Praise 5 Intelligence Praise4.5 Trial 1 Trial 3
    • 27. Boys get 8 times more criticism than girls
    • 28. The effects of praise Swimming “You do your best swimming when you concentrate and try your best to do what Chris is asking you to do” Ballet “You’re the best ballerina in the world!”
    • 29. 1.Good girl; 2.How extraordinary; 3.Great effort; 4.Outstanding performance; 5.What a scientist you are; 6.Unbelievable work; 7.You‟re a genius; 8.Youre getting better; 9.Clever boy 10.You should be proud; 11.Youve got it; 12.Youre special; 13. Verytalented; 14. Youve outdone yourself; 15. What a great listener; 16. You came through; 17.You‟re very artistic; 18.Keep up thegood work; 19.Its everything I hoped for; 20.Perfect; 21.A+ Work;22.Youre a shining star; 23.Inspired; 24.Youre #1; 25.Youre very responsible; 26.Youre very talented; 27.Spectacular work; 28.Great discovery; 29.Youre amazing; 30.What a great idea;31.Well worked through; 32.Very thoughtful; 33.You figured it out; 34.Top of the class; 35. You make me smile
    • 30. What is the typical influence on achievement? 900+ meta-analyses 50,000+ studies and 240+ million students
    • 31. Maths level An Effect SizeA common scale for measuring progress in student achievement
    • 32. Not everything countsNot everything that counts can be counted, and not everything that can be counted countsSign hanging inEinsteins office at Princeton
    • 33. Visible Learning, John Hattie2500020000 No. of Effects15000100005000 0 Negative Positive
    • 34. Bottom 75
    • 35. Teachers’ subject knowledge (0.09)Professor David Starkey, CBE
    • 36. Bottom 75
    • 37. Ability grouping doesn‟t seem to be the answer
    • 38. Ability grouping doesn‟t seem to be the answerAverage effect size of all strategies = 0.4(Hattie)Ability grouping (general) 0.17High ability students 0.09Medium ability students 0.51Low ability students - 0.60
    • 39. Top 75Rank Influence Studies Effects ES 1 Assessment capable students 209 305 1.44 5 Providing formative evaluation 30 78 .90 10 Feedback 1310 2086 .75
    • 40. Independent Learners self-assess accurately
    • 41. Other ways to challenge What‟s the point?Ready Learning Intentions Success Criteria Initial instructionFire First attempts by childrenAim Formative assessment and a focus on progress
    • 42. Ready: Learning Intentions & Success CriteriaLearning Intentionso To find out what links the Vikings with North East EnglandSuccess Criteriao Know when and where the Vikings came fromo Identify names and places associated with the Vikingso Ask relevant questions
    • 43. Why did they Gate AD 700 - 1100 attack Lindisfarne? Bairns Lad Tarn Vikings Thriding Norse Rape &language pillage Did they believe in Longships God? Dragon Horned ships helmets
    • 44. Marzano – groups of 3 work best Informal Formal Long-term
    • 45. Why did they Gate AD 700 - 1100 attack Lindisfarne? Bairns Captured Lad Yorvik in 866 Tarn Vikings Thriding Norse Rape & language pillage King Cnut Did they believe inruled England Longships God? from 1016 Dragon Horned helmets Gods included ships Odin, Thor, Fri Eric Bloodaxe gg & Loki Dead warriors went died in 954 to Valhalla
    • 46. Learning Detectives
    • 47. Year 7 – Food UnitLearning Intentionso Understand the process of hazard analysis and how itapplies to foodSuccess Criteriao Use technical vocabularyo Identify a wide range of types of hazardo Communicate coherently
    • 48. Formative vs. Summative assessment Group Feedback Pre-Post Gain Attitudes A Comments only 30% gain Positive B Marks only Top 25% + No gain Bottom 25% - C Marks and Top 25% + No gain comments Bottom 25% - Butler (1997)
    • 49. Follow upjames@p4c.comjamesnottingham.co.uk slideshare.net/jabulani4 @JamesNottinghm James Nottingham Challenging Learning

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