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  • Attempts to identify traits consistently associated with leadership (the process of leading, not the person) were more successful. The seven traits shown to be associated with effective leadership are described briefly in Exhibit 17-1. <br />
  • Researchers hoped that the behavioral theories approach would provide more definitive answers about the nature of leadership than did the trait theories. The four main leader behavior studies are summarized in Exhibit 17-2. <br />
  • Each leadership situation was evaluated in terms of these three contingency variables, which when combined produced eight possible situations that were either favorable or unfavorable for the leader. (See the bottom of the chart in Exhibit 17-3.) Situations I, II, and III were classified as highly favorable for the leader. Situations IV, V, and VI were moderately favorable for the leader. Situations VII and VIII were described as highly unfavorable for the leader. <br />
  • As Exhibit 17-4 illustrates, path-goal theory proposes two situational or contingency variables that moderate the leadership behavior-outcome relationship: those in the environment that are outside the control of the follower (factors including task structure, formal authority system, and the work group) and those that are part of the personal characteristics of the follower (including locus of control, experience, and perceived ability). <br />
  • A meaningful way to describe the team leader’s job is to focus on two priorities: (1) managing the team’s external boundary and (2) facilitating the team process. These priorities entail four specific leadership roles. (See Exhibit 17-5.) <br />
  • Research has shown that trust in leadership is significantly related to positive job outcomes including job performance, organizational citizenship behavior, job satisfaction, and organizational commitment. Given the importance of trust in effective leadership, how can leaders build trust? Exhibit 17-6 lists some suggestions. (Also, see the Building Your Skill exercise in Chapter 5.) <br />
  • Leaders can’t (and shouldn’t) simply choose their styles randomly. They’re constrained by the cultural conditions their followers have come to expect. Exhibit 17-7 provides some findings from selected examples of cross-cultural leadership studies. <br />

Robbins mgmt11 ppt17_ge Robbins mgmt11 ppt17_ge Presentation Transcript

  • Copyright © 2012 Pearson Education, Inc. ©2012 Pearson Education Publishing as Prentice Hall Management, Eleventh Edition, Global Edition by Stephen P. Robbins & Mary Coulter 17- 1
  • Chapter 17: Leadership • Define leader and leadership • Compare and contrast early theories of leadership • Describe the three major contingency theories of leadership • Describe contemporary views of leadership • Discuss contemporary issues affecting leadership Copyright © 2012 Pearson Education, Inc. ©2012 Pearson Education Publishing as Prentice Hall Management, Eleventh Edition, Global Edition by Stephen P. Robbins & Mary Coulter 17- 2
  • Who Are Leaders and What Is Leadership? • Leader - Someone who can influence others and who has managerial authority. • Leadership - What leaders do; the process of influencing a group to achieve goals. • Ideally, all managers should be leaders. Copyright © 2012 Pearson Education, Inc. ©2012 Publishing as Prentice Hall Pearson Education Management, Eleventh Edition, Global Edition by Stephen P. Robbins & Mary Coulter 17- 3
  • Early Leadership Theories • Trait Theories (1920s -1930s) – Research focused on identifying personal characteristics that differentiated leaders from non-leaders was unsuccessful. – Later research on the leadership process identified seven traits associated with successful leadership: • Drive, the desire to lead, honesty and integrity, selfconfidence, intelligence, job-relevant knowledge, and extraversion Copyright © 2012 Pearson Education, Inc. ©2012 Publishing as Prentice Hall Pearson Education Management, Eleventh Edition, Global Edition by Stephen P. Robbins & Mary Coulter 17- 4
  • Exhibit 17-1: Seven Traits Associated with Leadership Copyright © 2012 Pearson Education, Inc. ©2012 Publishing as Prentice Hall Pearson Education Management, Eleventh Edition, Global Edition by Stephen P. Robbins & Mary Coulter 17- 5
  • Early Leadership Theories (cont.) • Behavioral Theories – University of Iowa Studies (Kurt Lewin) • Identified three leadership styles: – Autocratic style: centralized authority, low participation – Democratic style: involvement, high participation, feedback – Laissez faire style: hands-off management • Research findings: mixed results – No specific style was consistently better for producing better performance. – Employees were more satisfied under a democratic leader than under an autocratic leader. Copyright © 2012 Pearson Education, Inc. ©2012 Publishing as Prentice Hall Pearson Education Management, Eleventh Edition, Global Edition by Stephen P. Robbins & Mary Coulter 17- 6
  • Behavioral Theories (cont.) • Ohio State Studies – Identified two dimensions of leader behavior: • Initiating structure: the role of the leader in defining his or her role and the roles of group members. • Consideration: the leader’s mutual trust and respect for group members’ ideas and feelings. Copyright © 2012 Pearson Education, Inc. ©2012 Publishing as Prentice Hall Pearson Education Management, Eleventh Edition, Global Edition by Stephen P. Robbins & Mary Coulter 17- 7
  • Mixed Results of Ohio State Studies • High consideration/high structure leaders generally, but not always, achieved high scores on group task performance and satisfaction. • Evidence indicated that situational factors appeared to strongly influence leadership effectiveness. Copyright © 2012 Pearson Education, Inc. ©2012 Publishing as Prentice Hall Pearson Education Management, Eleventh Edition, Global Edition by Stephen P. Robbins & Mary Coulter 17- 8
  • University of Michigan Studies • Identified two dimensions of leader behavior: – Employee oriented: emphasizing personal relationships – Production oriented: emphasizing task accomplishment • Research findings: – Leaders who are employee oriented are strongly associated with high group productivity and high job satisfaction. Copyright © 2012 Pearson Education, Inc. ©2012 Publishing as Prentice Hall Pearson Education Management, Eleventh Edition, Global Edition by Stephen P. Robbins & Mary Coulter 17- 9
  • The Managerial Grid • Appraises leadership styles using two dimensions: • Concern for people • Concern for production • Places managerial styles in five categories: • Impoverished management • Task management • Middle-of-the-road management • Country club management • Team management Copyright © 2012 Pearson Education, Inc. ©2012 Publishing as Prentice Hall Pearson Education Management, Eleventh Edition, Global Edition by Stephen P. Robbins & Mary Coulter 17- 10
  • Exhibit 17-2: Behavioral Theories of Leadership Copyright © 2012 Pearson Education, Inc. ©2012 Publishing as Prentice Hall Pearson Education Management, Eleventh Edition, Global Edition by Stephen P. Robbins & Mary Coulter 17- 11
  • Exhibit 17-2: Behavioral Theories of Leadership (cont.) Copyright © 2012 Pearson Education, Inc. ©2012 Publishing as Prentice Hall Pearson Education Management, Eleventh Edition, Global Edition by Stephen P. Robbins & Mary Coulter 17- 12
  • Contingency Theories of Leadership • The Fiedler Model – Proposes that effective group performance depends upon the proper match between the leader’s style of interacting with followers and the degree to which the situation allows the leader to control and influence. Copyright © 2012 Pearson Education, Inc. ©2012 Publishing as Prentice Hall Pearson Education Management, Eleventh Edition, Global Edition by Stephen P. Robbins & Mary Coulter 17- 13
  • The Fiedler Model (cont.) • Assumptions: – A certain leadership style should be most effective in different types of situations. – Leaders do not readily change leadership styles. • Matching the leader to the situation or changing the situation to make it favorable to the leader is required. Copyright © 2012 Pearson Education, Inc. ©2012 Publishing as Prentice Hall Pearson Education Management, Eleventh Edition, Global Edition by Stephen P. Robbins & Mary Coulter 17- 14
  • The Fiedler Model (cont.) • Least-preferred co-worker (LPC) questionnaire – Determines leadership style by measuring responses to 18 pairs of contrasting adjectives • High score: a relationship-oriented leadership style • Low score: a task-oriented leadership style • Situational factors in matching leader to the situation: • Leader-member relations • Task structure • Position power Copyright © 2012 Pearson Education, Inc. ©2012 Publishing as Prentice Hall Pearson Education Management, Eleventh Edition, Global Edition by Stephen P. Robbins & Mary Coulter 17- 15
  • Exhibit 17-3: The Fiedler Model Copyright © 2012 Pearson Education, Inc. ©2012 Publishing as Prentice Hall Pearson Education Management, Eleventh Edition, Global Edition by Stephen P. Robbins & Mary Coulter 17- 16
  • Contingency Theories of Leadership • Hersey and Blanchard’s Situational Leadership Theory (SLT) – Argues that successful leadership is achieved by selecting the right leadership style which is contingent on the level of the followers’ readiness • Acceptance: leadership effectiveness depends on whether followers accept or reject a leader • Readiness: the extent to which followers have the ability and willingness to accomplish a specific task – Leaders must relinquish control over and contact with followers as they become more competent. Copyright © 2012 Pearson Education, Inc. ©2012 Publishing as Prentice Hall Pearson Education Management, Eleventh Edition, Global Edition by Stephen P. Robbins & Mary Coulter 17- 17
  • Situational Leadership Theory (SLT) • Creates four specific leadership styles incorporating Fiedler’s two leadership dimensions: – Telling: high task-low relationship leadership – Selling: high task-high relationship leadership – Participating: low task-high relationship leadership – Delegating: low task-low relationship leadership Copyright © 2012 Pearson Education, Inc. ©2012 Publishing as Prentice Hall Pearson Education Management, Eleventh Edition, Global Edition by Stephen P. Robbins & Mary Coulter 17- 18
  • Situational Leadership Theory (SLT) • Four stages of follower readiness: – R1: followers are unable and unwilling – R2: followers are unable but willing – R3: followers are able but unwilling – R4: followers are able and willing Copyright © 2012 Pearson Education, Inc. ©2012 Publishing as Prentice Hall Pearson Education Management, Eleventh Edition, Global Edition by Stephen P. Robbins & Mary Coulter 17- 19
  • Contingency Theories of Leadership • Path-Goal Model – States that the leader’s job is to assist his or her followers in attaining their goals and to provide direction or support to ensure that their goals are compatible with those of the organization – Depending on the situation, leaders assume different leadership styles at different times: • Directive leader • Supportive leader • Participative leader • Achievement oriented leader Copyright © 2012 Pearson Education, Inc. ©2012 Publishing as Prentice Hall Pearson Education Management, Eleventh Edition, Global Edition by Stephen P. Robbins & Mary Coulter 17- 20
  • Exhibit 17-4: Path-Goal Model Copyright © 2012 Pearson Education, Inc. ©2012 Publishing as Prentice Hall Pearson Education Management, Eleventh Edition, Global Edition by Stephen P. Robbins & Mary Coulter 17- 21
  • Contemporary Views of Leadership • Transactional Leadership – Leaders who guide or motivate their followers in the direction of established goals by clarifying role and task requirements. • Transformational Leadership – Leaders who inspire followers to transcend their own self-interests for the good of the organization by clarifying role and task requirements. Copyright © 2012 Pearson Education, Inc. ©2012 Publishing as Prentice Hall Pearson Education Management, Eleventh Edition, Global Edition by Stephen P. Robbins & Mary Coulter 17- 22
  • Contemporary Views of Leadership • Charismatic Leadership – An enthusiastic, self-confident leader whose personality and actions influence people to behave in certain ways. – Characteristics of charismatic leaders: • Have a vision • Are able to articulate the vision • Are willing to take risks to achieve the vision • Are sensitive to the environment and follower needs • Exhibit behaviors that are out of the ordinary Copyright © 2012 Pearson Education, Inc. ©2012 Publishing as Prentice Hall Pearson Education Management, Eleventh Edition, Global Edition by Stephen P. Robbins & Mary Coulter 17- 23
  • Contemporary Views of Leadership • Visionary Leadership – A leader who creates and articulates a realistic, credible, and attractive vision of the future that improves upon the present situation. • Visionary leaders have the ability to: – Explain the vision to others – Express the vision not just verbally but through behavior – Extend or apply the vision to different leadership contexts Copyright © 2012 Pearson Education, Inc. ©2012 Publishing as Prentice Hall Pearson Education Management, Eleventh Edition, Global Edition by Stephen P. Robbins & Mary Coulter 17- 24
  • Contemporary Views of Leadership • Team Leadership Characteristics: – Having patience to share information – Being able to trust others and to give up authority – Understanding when to intervene • Team Leader’s Job – Managing the team’s external boundary – Facilitating the team process • Includes coaching, facilitating, handling disciplinary problems, reviewing team and individual performance, training, and communication Copyright © 2012 Pearson Education, Inc. ©2012 Publishing as Prentice Hall Pearson Education Management, Eleventh Edition, Global Edition by Stephen P. Robbins & Mary Coulter 17- 25
  • Exhibit 17-5: Team Leadership Roles Copyright © 2012 Pearson Education, Inc. ©2012 Publishing as Prentice Hall Pearson Education Management, Eleventh Edition, Global Edition by Stephen P. Robbins & Mary Coulter 17- 26
  • Managing Power – Legitimate power • The power a leader has as a result of his or her position. – Coercive power • The power a leader has to punish or control. – Reward power • The power to give positive benefits or rewards. – Expert power • The influence a leader can exert as a result of his or her expertise, skills, or knowledge. – Referent power • The power of a leader that arises because of a person’s desirable resources or admired personal traits. Copyright © 2012 Pearson Education, Inc. ©2012 Publishing as Prentice Hall Pearson Education Management, Eleventh Edition, Global Edition by Stephen P. Robbins & Mary Coulter 17- 27
  • Developing Trust • Credibility (of a Leader) – The assessment of a leader’s honesty, competence, and ability to inspire by his or her followers • Trust – The belief of followers (and others) in the integrity, character, and ability of a leader • Dimensions of trust: integrity, competence, consistency, loyalty, and openness – Is related to increases in job performance, organizational citizenship behaviors, job satisfaction, and organization commitment Copyright © 2012 Pearson Education, Inc. ©2012 Publishing as Prentice Hall Pearson Education Management, Eleventh Edition, Global Edition by Stephen P. Robbins & Mary Coulter 17- 28
  • Exhibit 17-6: Building Trust Copyright © 2012 Pearson Education, Inc. ©2012 Publishing as Prentice Hall Pearson Education Management, Eleventh Edition, Global Edition by Stephen P. Robbins & Mary Coulter 17- 29
  • Empowering Employees • Empowerment – Increasing the decision-making discretion of workers such that teams can make key operating decisions in developing budgets, scheduling workloads, controlling inventories, and solving quality problems. Copyright © 2012 Pearson Education, Inc. ©2012 Publishing as Prentice Hall Pearson Education Management, Eleventh Edition, Global Edition by Stephen P. Robbins & Mary Coulter 17- 30
  • Why Empower employees? • Quicker responses to problems and faster decisions • Addresses the problem of increased spans of control in relieving managers so they can address other problems Copyright © 2012 Pearson Education, Inc. ©2012 Publishing as Prentice Hall Pearson Education Management, Eleventh Edition, Global Edition by Stephen P. Robbins & Mary Coulter 17- 31
  • Cross-Cultural Leadership • Universal Elements of Effective Leadership – Vision – Foresight – Providing encouragement – Trustworthiness – Dynamism – Positiveness – Proactiveness Copyright © 2012 Pearson Education, Inc. ©2012 Publishing as Prentice Hall Pearson Education Management, Eleventh Edition, Global Edition by Stephen P. Robbins & Mary Coulter 17- 32
  • Exhibit 17-7: Cross-Cultural Leadership Copyright © 2012 Pearson Education, Inc. ©2012 Publishing as Prentice Hall Pearson Education Management, Eleventh Edition, Global Edition by Stephen P. Robbins & Mary Coulter 17- 33
  • Gender Differences and Leadership • Research Findings – Males and females use different styles: • Women tend to adopt a more democratic or participative style unless in a male-dominated job. • Women tend to use transformational leadership. • Men tend to use transactional leadership. Copyright © 2012 Pearson Education, Inc. ©2012 Publishing as Prentice Hall Pearson Education Management, Eleventh Edition, Global Edition by Stephen P. Robbins & Mary Coulter 17- 34
  • Leader Training • Training is more likely to be successful with individuals who are high self-monitors than those who are low self-monitors. • Individuals with higher levels of motivation to lead are more receptive to leadership development opportunities. Copyright © 2012 Pearson Education, Inc. ©2012 Publishing as Prentice Hall Pearson Education Management, Eleventh Edition, Global Edition by Stephen P. Robbins & Mary Coulter 17- 35
  • Substitutes for Leadership • Follower characteristics – Experience, training, professional orientation, or the need for independence • Job characteristics – Routine, unambiguous, and satisfying jobs • Organization characteristics – Explicit formalized goals, rigid rules and procedures, or cohesive work groups Copyright © 2012 Pearson Education, Inc. ©2012 Publishing as Prentice Hall Pearson Education Management, Eleventh Edition, Global Edition by Stephen P. Robbins & Mary Coulter 17- 36
  • Terms to Know • • • • • • • • • • • leader leadership behavioral theories autocratic style democratic style laissez-faire style initiating structure consideration high-high leader managerial grid Fiedler contingency model • least-preferred co-worker (LPC) questionnaire • leader-member relations • task structure • position power • situational leadership theory (SLT) • readiness • leader participation model • path-goal theory • transactional leaders Copyright © 2012 Pearson Education, Inc. ©2012 Publishing as Prentice Hall Pearson Education Management, Eleventh Edition, Global Edition by Stephen P. Robbins & Mary Coulter 17- 37
  • Copyright © 2012 Pearson Education, Inc. ©2012 Publishing as Prentice Hall Pearson Education Management, Eleventh Edition, Global Edition by Stephen P. Robbins & Mary Coulter 17- 38