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Forces and materials teaching ideas JVillis
Forces and materials teaching ideas JVillis
Forces and materials teaching ideas JVillis
Forces and materials teaching ideas JVillis
Forces and materials teaching ideas JVillis
Forces and materials teaching ideas JVillis
Forces and materials teaching ideas JVillis
Forces and materials teaching ideas JVillis
Forces and materials teaching ideas JVillis
Forces and materials teaching ideas JVillis
Forces and materials teaching ideas JVillis
Forces and materials teaching ideas JVillis
Forces and materials teaching ideas JVillis
Forces and materials teaching ideas JVillis
Forces and materials teaching ideas JVillis
Forces and materials teaching ideas JVillis
Forces and materials teaching ideas JVillis
Forces and materials teaching ideas JVillis
Forces and materials teaching ideas JVillis
Forces and materials teaching ideas JVillis
Forces and materials teaching ideas JVillis
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Forces and materials teaching ideas JVillis

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Teaching ideas for teaching year 3/4 forces and the properties of materials. These ideas are linked to the Australian Curriculum. Additional teaching ideas related to technology can be found on one of …

Teaching ideas for teaching year 3/4 forces and the properties of materials. These ideas are linked to the Australian Curriculum. Additional teaching ideas related to technology can be found on one of my websites called http://technologiesjvillis.weebly.com/ .

Student work samples will be added to this PowerPoint after I have taught the lessons.

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  • 1. http://pixabay.com/en/question-mark-question-response-96288/ Forces and the Properties of Materials Teaching ideas by Joanne Villis
  • 2. Forces and the Properties of Materials Teaching ideas by Joanne Villis AUSTRALIAN CURRICULUM (Y3/4) Investigate how forces and the properties of materials affect the behaviour of a product or system (ACTDEK011) Select and use materials, components, tools and equipment using safe work practices to make designed solutions (ACTDEP016) Generate, develop, and communicate design ideas and decisions using appropriate technical terms and graphical representation techniques (ACTDEP015) Plan a sequence of production steps when making designed solutions individually and collaboratively (ACTDEP018)
  • 3. Forces and the Properties of Materials Teaching ideas by Joanne Villis MARBLE RUN INVESTIGATION Aims: Students investigate how different materials can be used in the design of a marble run (ACTDEK011) Students investigate how movement can be initiated by combining materials and force (ACTDEK011) Students design a marble run and plan a sequence of production steps ACTDEP015) (ACTDEP018) Students select and use materials safely (ACTDEP016) Lesson 1 & 2: Inform students that their design challenge is going to be the construction of 3 marble runs. One marble run needs to be fast, one medium and the other slow. On the whiteboard show students what a marble run might look like and explain the purpose (ie for a marble to start at the top and roll to the bottom).
  • 4. Forces and the Properties of Materials Teaching ideas by Joanne Villis Here is an example of what you may draw on your whiteboard. At this point I would also show students what a marble actually looks like and conduct an image search on the internet, in order to show students what commercial marble runs look like. end of marble run
  • 5. Forces and the Properties of Materials Teaching ideas by Joanne Villis As a class, discuss what might effect the speed of which a marble rolls? How might they create 3 marble runs so that the marble travels at different speeds? Invite students to consider how they might investigate their ideas? Then give each student a sticky note and ask them to write an ‘I think’ statement. For example, ‘I think the slope of the marble run effects the speed’, ‘I think the length of the marble run effects the speed’ or ‘I think the materials used for the marble run effects the speed’. Then ask students to turn their ‘I think’ statement into a question. If you haven’t used this method with your class before I suggest that you complete this part of the lesson as a group and model how to change a statement into a question.
  • 6. Forces and the Properties of Materials Teaching ideas by Joanne Villis Invite students to stick their sticky note on the whiteboard so that others can see their question and statement. This enables students to share their thoughts. Then show students a range of junk materials (ie planks of wood, toilet rolls, boxes, paper, blocks, stop watches, straws, containers, rulers etc) and ask students to consider how they might use the materials to investigate their question. It is important to emphasise that they are not making their marble runs, they are creating an investigation in order to answer their question. Students are then asked to list the materials they need and write a method for their investigation.
  • 7. Forces and the Properties of Materials Teaching ideas by Joanne Villis
  • 8. Forces and the Properties of Materials Teaching ideas by Joanne Villis Lesson 3 and 4: Students conduct their investigation, record their results and write a few sentences explaining what their results mean. Share student’s results as a group.
  • 9. Forces and the Properties of Materials Teaching ideas by Joanne Villis Lesson 5: This is the design part. Ask students to draw a design of 3 marble runs of different speeds. Students need to label each run and label the materials needed.
  • 10. Forces and the Properties of Materials Teaching ideas by Joanne Villis Lesson 6 & 7: This is the making part. Ask students to make their marble runs. You will need a range of junk materials. I often ask students to bring any materials from home that they would like to use. Remind students that they need to refer to their design and if they change things throughout the process the changes need to be recorded.
  • 11. Forces and the Properties of Materials Teaching ideas by Joanne Villis
  • 12. Forces and the Properties of Materials Teaching ideas by Joanne Villis Lesson 6 & 7 continued: Students can use an iPad app called Explain everything to record their design.
  • 13. Forces and the Properties of Materials Teaching ideas by Joanne Villis Lesson 8: This is the testing and sharing part. Allow each student to test and share their marble run with the class. When I did this part several marble runs didn’t work as the marble couldn’t fit through one of the paths or it got stuck to sticky tape. If students’ marble runs don’t work it is important to discuss why and what could be changed to make it work. Additional task: Allow students to play Tinker Ball online. On the following page there are some marble runs for teacher reference. I wouldn’t show students these images until they have completed lesson 8. Showing them after the lesson may inspire some students to create their own marble runs in their own time.
  • 14. Forces and the Properties of Materials Teaching ideas by Joanne Villis
  • 15. Forces and the Properties of Materials Teaching ideas by Joanne Villis INCLINED PLANES INVESTIGATION Aim: Students investigate how the slope of an inclined plane effects the amount of force needed to move an object (ACTDEK011) Lesson 9-10: The inclined plane is a simple machine. It is simply a flat sloping surface. Ask students to think about their marble run. Did it have any inclined planes? What were they used for? Tell students that inclined planes can also be used to lift heavy loads to a higher level. “Raising any object a certain distance takes considerable work, but by moving that object up a gentle slope, instead of lifting it straight up, less effort (force) is needed. Think about why mountain roads wind around, rather than go straight up the mountain, or why we use ramps to load heavy things onto trucks, or why we are less tired after we walk up a gentle hill compared to a walk up a steep hill. These are all examples of inclined planes” (source).
  • 16. Forces and the Properties of Materials Teaching ideas by Joanne Villis Download and conduct Professor Beaker’s Learning Lab about inclined plans. For this investigation students will need: a plastic sandwich bag with a twist tie 35 marbles string (30 cm long) a stack of books a long smooth board (or cookie sheet) a rubber band scale (instruction for making this are provided in the download)
  • 17. Forces and the Properties of Materials Teaching ideas by Joanne Villis The aim of the investigation is to find out if it is easier or harder to pull the bag of marbles up an inclined plane than to lift it straight up. Although this investigation is more structured compared to the marble run investigation, it allows student to investigate how the slope of an inclined plane effects the amount of force needed to move the marbles.
  • 18. Forces and the Properties of Materials Teaching ideas by Joanne Villis RUBBER BAND BOAT INVESTIGATION Aim: Students investigate how the twisting and releasing of a rubber band effects the amount of force (movement) (ACTDEK011) 11 & 12: Show students a YouTube video on how to make a rubber band boat. They can also follow the instructions on this website. Ask students to describe what makes the boat move? What happens if you twist the rubber band once, twice or 10 times? How does the number of twists effect the movement of the boat? Invite students to plan and conduct an investigation to test their thoughts.
  • 19. Forces and the Properties of Materials Teaching ideas by Joanne Villis RUBBER BAND BOAT DESIGN Aims: Students design a rubber band boat and plan a sequence of production steps in order to construct their boat (ACTDEP015) (ACTDEP018) Students select and use materials safely (ACTDEP016) Lesson 13-14: Show students a range of materials. Invite them to design their own rubber band boat using the materials provided. Students need to draw and label their design, including a list of materials needed. During this process, invite students to think about the properties of the materials they are choosing. Will they enable the boat to float? Will they repel or soak up water. Students construct their boat, test it and share it with the class.
  • 20. Forces and the Properties of Materials Teaching ideas by Joanne Villis PLASTIC CUP VOTEX GLIDERS Aim: Students investigate how the stretch of a rubber band effects the amount of movement of an object (ACTDEK011) Lesson 15: I saw this idea at a Science Expo and they gave me permission to take a photo of the image to the right. This is a simple idea, yet challenges the minds of students. Simply stick 2 plastic cups together with sticky take, wrap a broken rubber band around the middle, hold one end and launch. The rubber band flings the cups spinning into the air. Invite student to draw and label a diagram of the vortex gliders. Invite them to describe what is happening, what causes the movement? What happens if they stretch the rubber band tighter? You might even like to ask students to think of how they might change one aspect of the vortex and how it might effect the movement. This would involve a process similar to the first investigation in this unit.
  • 21. Forces and the Properties of Materials Teaching ideas by Joanne Villis COPYRIGHT I give permission for the following: Adaptations and sharing of this resources is for educational purpose only. I do not give permission for commercial use of this work. When sharing or adapting this work I ask that you give credit to the original creator, Joanne Villis at http://intertecheducation.edublogs.org/ .These ideas may be used for non-commercial purposes only. As noted in this PowerPoint, the inclined plane investigation is not my work. It is the work of Professor Beaker and a link to the original document has been provided. Contact details: http://intertecheducation.edublogs.org/ jvillis@inter-tech.com.au http://www.pinterest.com/joannevillis/

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