HPQ pupil folder files

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A file containing a variety of worksheets and documents to structure and scaffold pupils working through the HPQ with EDEXCEL.
It does not contain the exam board's official Project Proposal and Activity Log forms, to be safe in terms of copyright, but these can be downloaded from the EDEXCEL website.

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HPQ pupil folder files

  1. 1. EPQ: Weekly Targets and Outcomes Tracker This sheet will be used at the beginning for every lesson for you to record the tasks that need to be completed. These tasks will be a mixture of tasks both set by the teacher, and your own personal targets. These will then be checked every week to ensure that you are staying on-track, and to give you feedback on the work you have done. Name: Date Re- done? Target/Outcomes Done ? R =0 A =1 G =2 Comment
  2. 2. Weekly Planning and Activity Log This will be completed during the last ten minutes of every lesson. This will be your draft, and you will then type this up onto the official form. You should record on this table what you achieved, giving a detailed and clear record of activities and learning. You should refer to your time- plan to show that you are attempting to follow it, and explain any changes that you have had to make. You must also describe any problems, and explain how these were overcome. Date Activity Log (What I did achieve) Teacher Comments 1-9-13 I completed most of the form with no problems. Writing about the reasons why I chose the project title made me think carefully about my motivations, which was helpful as it made me clarify some goals I want to achieve. I found the time-plan difficult as I am not sure I have included all the tasks that I will need to complete through the whole project, and whether I have left enough time for specific tasks. It is completed but probably needs more detail to improve it. Project proposal form is good. Generally band 2 overall. Agree that the time-plan needs more detail to make it a firm band 2. Look at the example form for help and see me if you need further advice.
  3. 3. Date Activity Log (What I did achieve) Teacher Comments
  4. 4. EPQ Assessment and Deadlines COMPLETED PROJECT DEADLINE: 14 February 2014 Here is a tick-list of the essential evidence that needs to be handed in for assessment. Following this list is an explanation of what each should include.  Project Proposal Form (AO1)  Project Activity Log (AO1)  Record of research carried out (Bibliography and within project outcome) (AO2)  Project outcome (essay/write-up) (AO3, plus AO2 and AO4)  Project review (AO4) AO1 Manage (17.5%): Select, plan and carry out a project applying a range of skills and methods to achieve objectives. Project Proposal Form This form shows that you can plan and manage your project. It should provide detailed and clear information about what you are going to do, and how you will do it. It will include:  A clearly stated question  Clear, specific and thoughtful reasons for your choice  A time-plan containing key activities that need to be completed, in an appropriate order  A clear description of the resources that will be needed and what these resources will be used for Project Activity Log The Project Activity Log should be completed every week at the end of each session. This document will include:  A detailed and clear record of activities and learning  Clear attempts to follow the time plan  Explanations of any changes to the plan  Descriptions of any problems, and explanations of how these were overcome Your Project Activity Log is evidence to show that you are managing your time and resources effectively, and will reflect the activities on the Project Proposal Form. AO2 Use resources (22.5%): Research, select, organise and use information, and select and use a range of resources. Interpret data and apply findings. As part of the project, you will need to carry out research to help you answer your title question. The evidence for this will be within your essay, in which you use supporting evidence and alternative viewpoints to explore answers to your questions. Also, your bibliography will list all sources that you found and used in your research. For this assessment objective you will need to show that you can:  Research using a wide range of sources  Select relevant sources and information  Where appropriate, carry out primary research  Information found is applied well to the project and referenced clearly  Show a clear understanding of the reliability of secondary sources  Record sources in a bibliography using a consistent method
  5. 5. AO3 Develop and realise (42.5%): Select and use a range of skills, including, where appropriate, new technologies and problem solving, to achieve planned objectives. This is a written essay, that will bring together the research you have done in attempting to find the answer to your project question. The write-up should follow this structure: Section Words Content Introduction 300 Explanation of your research question Rationale for your project Research 800 The information you have found Evaluation of the reliability of the information References Discussion 900 Your own answer to your research question Arguments to support your answer Consideration of alternative viewpoints Conclusion 200 Summing up of your ideas and findings Summarise your opinion and give a final answer to your question Evaluation 300 How your ideas have developed What you have learned in the project What worked well and what did not What you would do differently next time How you would extend your project Essay-writing and presentation advice When writing your essay, make sure you show/include the following:  Good understanding of the topic  Clear answer to the title question  Supporting evidence and alternative viewpoints Your essay should also be:  Written in a clear and accurate style o Spelling, punctuation and grammar o Neutral, formal writing-style  Presented in a logical and obvious order o Title and contents pages o Headings o Page numbers o Footnotes and/or references o Labels  Use clear connections between sections AO4 Review (17.5%) Evaluate project outcomes and own learning and performance. Use communication skills to present evidence, outcomes and conclusions in an appropriate format. Your review gives you the chance to reflect on and review your project and learning. Detailed conclusions in answer to your project title with firm evidence to support this  Which objectives were/were not achieved and give convincing reasons why  Assess how successful the project has been and how well you have managed  Describe the skills you have learned and knowledge you have developed  Explain what you would do differently and why  Give clear ideas for how to follow up (extend) the work you have done, with other areas of interest you would like to explore in the future
  6. 6. Planning your project question To get you to begin thinking about the topics you are interested in, answer the questions below.School What subjects do I enjoy at school? Which do I have a real interest in? Which will I consider choosing to study at A-level? What is it you enjoy about these subjects? Have I studied any topics that I wanted to find out more about? Personal What hobbies do I have? What interests do I have outside of school? What am I passionate about? What issues do I have strong opinions on? Do I have any personal areas of interest that might be appropriate? Social Have there been any news items that have recently sparked my interest? Browse through the newspapers and books provided to help you reflect
  7. 7. Use this sheet to create a mind-map on one topic you are interested in. Add in potential questions, keywords, controversial ideas, things you disagree with and link these ideas where possible. Topic:
  8. 8. Use this sheet to create a mind-map on one topic you are interested in. Add in potential questions, keywords, controversial ideas, things you disagree with and link these ideas where possible. Topic:
  9. 9. Use this sheet to create a mind-map on one topic you are interested in. Add in potential questions, keywords, controversial ideas, things you disagree with and link these ideas where possible. Topic:
  10. 10. Step Two: Developing your ideas Now that you have a working title, you can start to develop your ideas and plan your project. The following activities will help you to do this. Planning Ideas To begin planning your project, answer the following questions: 1. What do you know about your topic/question? 2. What do you need to know about your topic/question? You may want to include the ideas below to help you:  Key topics  Theories and ideas  Key questions to be answered  Your, and others’, point-of-view  Theorists or people  Keywords and synonyms One way of answering these questions might be to create a brainstorm/s. These ideas will be a work in progress, and will need to be updated and adapted as your research progresses and ideas develop. You should keep this work together in a file or notebook to help you when conducting your research. Planning Resources To help you find out more about the things on your brainstorm, you need to answer the following question: What sources of information will you need, and how will you access them? Write a list of the different sources of information you will need in relation to your question, and try to be as specific as possible (i.e., if you need to use a journal, which journal will you need?). Examples of types of source include: Books Encyclopaedia Newspapers Magazines/journals TV programmes Blogs Websites Twitter Podcasts People/Experts Films Wikis Documentaries For each of the items you list, add how will you access them? Library Databases Search Engines Portals Directories Meetings Museums Surveys Interviews Visits Internet Your project should include at approximately 15 different sources, which you will need to record in a bibliography.
  11. 11. Access > Research > Analyse > Evaluate > Create Planning your pilot project research Using your mind-map of ideas, try to break down your knowledge about the topic in the table below so that you can begin to identify where you might begin your research. What do you know about this topic? What is/where will you find your evidence? What do you want to know (find out) to answer the question? What is/where will you find your evidence? What are your keywords that will help you search for information?
  12. 12. Project time-planning sheet What tasks will you need to complete for EPQ? Add them to this calendar to help you plan your time and activities. 2 September 9 September 16 September 23 September 30 September 7 October 14 October Hand in draft Project Proposal Form Hand in completed Project Proposal Form 21 October Half-term 4 November 11 November 18 November 25 November 2 December Hand in completed secondary research (at least 8 different sources) 9 December 16 December Xmas holiday Xmas holiday 6 January 13 January 20 January Hand in completed primary research MILESTONE ONE Complete all research in preparation for writing your essay Hand in essay plan MILESTONE TWO Hand in a first draft of your essay 27 January 3 February 10 February Half-term Hand in final draft
  13. 13. Time-Planning Tasks: card-sort activity Find secondary research Read, annotate and analyse secondary research Plan what, and where, to find secondary research Plan and design primary research Carry out primary research Analyse primary research Collate, review and summarise secondary research findings Write Research section of write- up Write Discussion section of write- up Summarise primary research findings Plan write-up Write Introduction section of write- up Write Conclusion section of write- up Write Evaluation Self- Review section of write-up Create a Bibliography for your write-up Edit first draft of write-up Complete a second-draft of write-up
  14. 14. Using Evernote to keep records of information accessed/research carried out (AO2) Evernote is a note-taking tool which you can use to save information from websites. It can be used and accessed online, as an app, or as an installed program on a PC. The great thing about it is that, once you have an account, you can access it anywhere that you have an internet connection, and the information will sync across all your devices. It is a great tool to use to record and organise your research, and will be useful to you for any research task in any subject. You can “clip” whole pages which you think are useful and that you want to read and use for your research, thereby saving the page itself as well as relevant information for your bibliography record. This short guide will show you how to get started. Go to Start > Programs > Evernote to open the Evernote program. Choose the option You will then be taken through stages in which you are able to register a new account. Complete the relevant field and click register. The program will be installed and opened for you to use. You can now begin adding content, notes and webpages to your Evernote account.
  15. 15. To save a webpage from Internet Explorer, to your Evernote account, click here A pop-up will appear, allowing you to add information relating to your New Clip. Give it a title that makes sense, if the one that is automatically generated doesn’t. You can add Tags (keywords) relating to the source. I suggest you use EPQ as one tag, then another keyword relating to the topic of the source. Save the note to add it to your account. You can view all your saved webpage clips and notes in the Evernote program.
  16. 16. The view is like an email account, with a brief view of each note in the middle column, and a preview of the note in the right-hand window Double-clicking on a note will open the note fully. In this new window you will find information that will be useful for your bibliography: The full URL Date accessed Title of the webpage This is a very useful tool, with many more features that you will find useful so take a look at it, explore and see whether it will work for you.
  17. 17. Using World Book Online to create a bibliography World Book Online has a very helpful citation builder, which will guide you through how to create a citation for each source in your bibliography. Here is how to do it. 1. Open the World Book Online website from the link on your desktop. 2. From the home page click on the Citation Builder link. 3. Choose the type of source you want to record in your bibliography. 4.Complete the relevant fields and click Create Citation 5. Your citation reference will be created for you to copy-paste into your bibliography
  18. 18. Access > Research > Analyse > Evaluate > Create Research Record Sheet (Who, What, When, Where and Why) Your name: Date: What type of source is it? …………………………………………………………… (book/www/journal etc) Title: …………………………………………………………… (include all titles you can see) Who produced it? ……………………………………………………………. (author’s name, organisation) When was it published? ……………………………………………………………. (date created) Where was it produced? …………………………………………………………… (publisher, country published) URL: …………………………………………………………… (the full web address) (advice: record as many details about the source as possible) My Notes: Use this space to record key quotes, ideas and your own thoughts from the source. Use the questions in the box to help you evaluate your source. What information you are getting from the source, and why might it be useful to you. Assess who produced the information and why you think they produced it. Can this author be trusted as someone who is reliable, and considering all the facts? Could the information be biased in some way? Is the information current and up- to-date? Are there any further questions this piece raises, or things to follow up? Comment on reliability: Reliability Rating: /5
  19. 19. Access > Research > Analyse > Evaluate > Create Research Record Sheet (Who, What, When, Where and Why) Your name: Date: What type of source is it? …………………………………………………………… (book/www/journal etc) Title: …………………………………………………………… (include all titles you can see) Who produced it? ……………………………………………………………. (author’s name, organisation) When was it published? ……………………………………………………………. (date created) Where was it produced? …………………………………………………………… (publisher, country published) URL: …………………………………………………………… (the full web address) (advice: record as many details about the source as possible) My Notes: Use this space to record key quotes, ideas and your own thoughts from the source. Use the questions in the box to help you evaluate your source. What information you are getting from the source, and why might it be useful to you. Assess who produced the information and why you think they produced it. Can this author be trusted as someone who is reliable, and considering all the facts? Could the information be biased in some way? Is the information current and up- to-date? Are there any further questions this piece raises, or things to follow up? Comment on reliability: Reliability Rating: /5
  20. 20. Referencing & Bibliographies Plagiarism = Presenting or copying another person’s ideas or work and presenting them as your own How do we avoid this?  Make it clear when you are using someone else’s work or words o You can do this either by directly quoting or paraphrasing o Whenever you quote or paraphrase, make sure you reference the source  Include a bibliography listing all the sources that you have used in your research What is a reference? When you use someone else’s ideas/words, or information you have taken from another source (such as a book, website, magazine etc.) by quoting or paraphrasing, you reference the source to show the reader where the information has come from. The reference is made up of information about the source from which you are quoting or paraphrasing. There are two ways to reference a source:  Your reference can be made within the text in brackets, after the quotation/paraphrase, and will include the author’s surname, the year in which the source was published, and the page number if relevant.  The alternative is to use footnotes, which will appear at the bottom of the page, and include the full reference to the source.
  21. 21. Whichever method you use, stick to the same one throughout the project write-up. What is a bibliography? A list of all the sources that you found that helped you in your research. Depending on the type of source, you will include extra information, but whatever type of source you have used, you should include at least the following details, in the form below: Author (Date published) Title (URL if applicable) Smart, John (2001) Twentieth Century British Drama If you want some help creating your bibliography, you can use Noodletools or one of these websites to guide you:  http://www.bibme.org/,  http://www.neilstoolbox.com/bibliography-creator/  http://easybib.com/ Have a go at the quiz activities at http://www3.ul.ie/referencing/index.html
  22. 22. Bibliography Template You can use http://www.easybib.com to create a record for each source that you have used. For each source, you should add a paragraph that summarises the source, and comments on the reliability. Books Author (Year published) Title (in italics) Place of Publication Publisher Greenhill, W. and Wignal, P. (2006) Shakespeare: A Life Oxford Heinemann Library Newspaper/magazine/journal article Author (Year published) ‘Title of article’ Title of journal/newspaper Issue info page # Vasager, J (2010) ‘Cameron orders ‘tough action’ over exam blunders’ The Guardian 23 June p.12
  23. 23. Online newspaper/magazine/journal article Author (Year published) ‘Title of article’ Title of journal/newspaper Issue info URL Date accessed Vasager, J (2010) ‘Cameron orders ‘tough action’ over exam blunders’ The Guardian 23 June http://www.guardian.co.uk/ed ucation/2011/jun/22/gcse-a- level-exam-paper-blunders Accessed : 23 June 2010 Websites (including blogs, news, etc) Author/website name (Date published) Title of web-page (in italics) URL/website address Date accessed Central Intelligence Agency (2010) The World Factbook https://www.cia.gov/library/publications/the- world-factbook/geos/eg.html Accessed: 6 May 2010
  24. 24. Writing up your project: Planning There are two different approached to planning and structuring your write-up. Plan 1 Section Word length Contents Introduction 350 Explanation of your research question Rationale for your project Research/ Discussion 1,500 P Q Q E E Discuss an answer/viewpoint to your question Present some evidence to support that answer Reference the evidence using quotations/footnotes Discuss and evaluate the reliability of the evidence Give your opinion on this answer/viewpoint Conclusion 200 Give a final answer in response to your question. Give an explanation as to why you have come to this conclusion. Evaluation 200 How your ideas have developed What you have learned in the project What worked well and what did not What you would do differently next time How you would extend your project Bibliography List of exactly where you obtained your information Example: Are young people to blame for the August Riots? Introduction Discussion P1 – Young people were to blame as they were the majority group involved in the riots. Q1 – present and discuss evidence from your research that supports this claim. E1 – Evaluate the reliability of the sources. Discuss your opinion on this point. P2 – the police were to blame as they did not deal with the riots appropriately Q1 – present and discuss evidence from your research that supports this claim. E1 – Evaluate the reliability of the sources. Discuss your opinion on this point. P3 – social networking was to blame because… Q1 – present and discuss evidence from your research that supports this claim. E1 – Evaluate the reliability of the sources. Discuss your opinion on this point. P4 – poverty was to blame because… Q1 – present and discuss evidence from your research that supports this claim. E1 – Evaluate the reliability of the sources. Discuss your opinion on this point. Conclusion and Evaluation
  25. 25. Plan 2 Section Word length Contents Introduction 350 Explanation of your research question Rationale for your project Research 800 The information you have found Evaluation of the reliability of the information References Discussion 1000 Your own answer to your research question Arguments to support your answer Consideration of alternative viewpoints Conclusion 200 Give a final answer in response to your question. Give an explanation as to why you have come to this conclusion. Evaluation 200 How your ideas have developed What you have learned in the project What worked well and what did not What you would do differently next time How you would extend your project Bibliography List of exactly where you obtained your information Introduction Research – During my research I found… Describe what you found out from your research Tell the “story” of what you did Evaluate the reliability of your sources Discussion Bring together your research Discuss your findings in relation to your question Conclusion Evaluation
  26. 26. Planning and writing your essay It is important to plan your essay before you start writing. To do this you should think about the following My Question: Introduction (approx 350 words) Explain your research question in detail, and your reasons for choosing it. Use your Project Proposal Form to help you. Research (approx 800 words) This is a discussion of the research process. This section should tell the reader what you did to research your topic, what you found and how this helped. Use this table to summarise each source from your secondary research. Discuss the sources that you used in your research. What did you find out? How did it help you? Evidence: List some evidence from this source that helped your research (key quotes) Source/critique: Comment on the source (5Ws) 1. 2. 3.
  27. 27. 4. 5. If you did some primary research, you can describe how you carried this out and the results of your research. What did these results tell you? What you did: Describe the type of research you carried out Results: What were the results? How did you go about interpreting and presenting them? Your analysis/interpretation: What did the results of your research tell you?
  28. 28. Discussion/Development (approx 1000 words) What are the possible answers to your question? Present some evidence to back up these answers. Discuss your response to these points-of-view and present your own. Your answer to your question: Your main points in answer to your question Evidence (quotations, statistics etc) Source Conclusion (approx. 300 words) Conclude your write-up, summarising the findings of the report and giving a final answer to your question, with reasons for your opinion with reference to evidence.
  29. 29. Planning your write-up Title: Introduction (approx 350 words): sometimes this is easier to write last Explain your research question in detail, and your reasons for choosing it. Use your Project Proposal Form to help you. Describe the key issues you are going to explore in the essay, and why these are the important issues in relation to your question. Research/Discussion (approx 1,500 words) What are the possible answers to your question? From your research, identify the various possible answers to your question. You should use your research to present some evidence to back up these answers. Discuss the reliability of the evidence/sources you have presented, give your response to the point-of-view and describe your own opinion in response to this point. Point Describe one point-of- view or answer to your question Quote/Evidence Present some evidence to support the answer. Quotes and sources. Explanation Discuss the reliability of the evidence. Give your own response/opinion.
  30. 30. Point Describe one point-of- view or answer to your question Quote/Evidence Present some evidence to support the answer. Quotes and sources. Explanation Discuss the reliability of the evidence. Give your own response/opinion. Point Describe one point-of- view or answer to your question Quote/Evidence Present some evidence to support the answer. Quotes and sources. Explanation Discuss the reliability of the evidence. Give your own response/opinion. Point Describe one point-of- view or answer to your question Quote/Evidence Present some evidence to support
  31. 31. the answer. Quotes and sources. Explanation Discuss the reliability of the evidence. Give your own response/opinion. Primary Research If you did some primary research, you can describe how you carried this out and the results of your research. What did these results tell you? What you did: Describe the type of research you carried out Results: What were the results? How did you go about interpreting and presenting them? Your analysis/interpretation: What did the results of your research tell you? Conclusion (200 words) Give a final answer in response to your question. Give an explanation as to why you have come to this conclusion.
  32. 32. Project Review Your review should be clear and detailed, using evidence from your project where possible. You should aim for 400 words, using the following questions to structure your paragraphs. Which objectives did you meet? Which did you not manage to meet and why? Overall, how successful was the project? Give examples of what was successful and what was not. How well did you manage your project work? Refer to what you achieved, your plan and your activity log for evidence.
  33. 33. What skills have you learned and used? What knowledge have you gained? What would you do differently next time, and why? Think about what did not go well and how you could improve on this next time. How could you follow up, and extend, your research? Give some clear ideas of further things you could do to extend your work. Were there any areas you did not have time to look into further?

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