4001EPS 2011 L6

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4001EPS 2011 L6

  1. 1. 4001EPS ICT and Pedagogy Lecture 6 Dr  Jason  Zagami Griffith  University
  2. 2. Digital Pedagogies
  3. 3. 1:38
  4. 4. 0:59
  5. 5. 1:07
  6. 6. Digital Learners
  7. 7. Digital LearnersHyper-communicatorsStudents use MP3 players, email, mobile phones, textmessaging and the Internet to connect instantly totheir friends, information and sounds
  8. 8. Digital LearnersMulti-taskersFor today’s student, it is normal to perform multipletasks and switch between them seamlessly, such asaccessing the Internet, listening to an MP3 player andtext messaging a friend
  9. 9. Digital LearnersGoal-orientedDigital students aspire to success, are ambitious andcan pursue multiple goals simultaneously througheffective task switching
  10. 10. Digital LearnersTo what extent will you engage each style?Goal-orientedMulti-taskersHyper-communicators
  11. 11. Digital Learners
  12. 12. Digital LearnersTo what extent will you engage each style? No Extent Great ExtentHyper-communicatorsMulti-taskersGoal-oriented
  13. 13. Digital Learners 1:52
  14. 14. Does curiosity builda good unit or program?
  15. 15. It doesn’t matter what you call it … • Driving question • Essential question • Compelling question • Key questionEvery unit or program you plan needs to have a question to hook your learners’ interest
  16. 16. The driving question that you come up with forms the basis for inquiry learningThe question needs to be juicy enough that it piques your learners’ interest
  17. 17. The standards ask us to plan learning experiences that are differentiated • All learners need work that will be challenging • C to E learners need work at their levelA good driving question will provide opportunities forlearners to ‘opt in’ to the learning at their level, while maintaining an inclusive environment
  18. 18. Let’s take a look at some sample driving questions
  19. 19. Let’s start with an age-old unit about coal mining What’s this unit really about? … Energy
  20. 20. How about we pose … ‘What are the forms of renewable and non-renewable energy?’This is okay, but it is still purely content-based If you used this question, the most you could really grade the learners is a C, as there is no higher-order thinking involved
  21. 21. Consider this question … ‘What would happen if we ran out of coal?’This is an improvement, but it’s probably not openended enough to really push those A level learners
  22. 22. Let’s consider a question appealing to learners ‘Why is Homer Simpson a danger at the power plant?’From here learners can go off in a whole lot of directions • • Nuclear power and its pros and cons • Which countries use it • Nuclear waste • What the alternatives are
  23. 23. Try something very topical, such as … ‘How big is my carbon footprint?’ This allows you to get the spread from A to E with lesscomplex activities, still picking up on the energy issuesbut the higher-order thinking encompassing topics such as whole household usage analysis or pulling apart the statistics Al Gore used in An Inconvenient Truth
  24. 24. Let’s look at the levels of these driving questions again so you can see the depth• What is coal mining really about?• What are the forms of renewable and non-renewable energy?• What would happen if we ran out of coal?• Why is Homer Simpson a danger at the power plant?• How big is my carbon footprint?
  25. 25. Use a driving question with ICT connectivity to hook and inspire your Digital Age learners They can select the ICT tools that will help them conduct their inquiry You become the facilitator of their journey
  26. 26. Technological Pedagogical Content Knowledge (TPCK)Technological Technological Technological Pedagogical Knowledge Content Knowledge (TK) Knowledge (TPK) (TCK) Pedagogical Content Knowledge Knowledge (PK) (CK) Pedagogical Content Knowledge (PCK) Context
  27. 27. Key TrendsTechnology increasingly impacting students’ lives
  28. 28. Key TrendsTechnology increasingly impacting students’ livesTechnology increasingly impacting how we work, play, learnand socialise
  29. 29. Key TrendsTechnology increasingly impacting students’ livesTechnology increasingly impacting how we work, play, learnand socialiseGrowing value being placed on creativity and innovation
  30. 30. Key TrendsTechnology increasingly impacting students’ livesTechnology increasingly impacting how we work, play, learnand socialiseGrowing value being placed on creativity and innovationRising interest in alternative and expanded learningenvironments
  31. 31. Key TrendsTechnology increasingly impacting students’ livesTechnology increasingly impacting how we work, play, learnand socialiseGrowing value being placed on creativity and innovationRising interest in alternative and expanded learningenvironmentsChanging model of how learning environments are defined
  32. 32. Critical ChallengesNeed for training in digital literacy skills and techniques
  33. 33. Critical ChallengesNeed for training in digital literacy skills and techniquesLack of alignment between how today’s students think and workvs. practice and products used to support their learning
  34. 34. Critical ChallengesNeed for training in digital literacy skills and techniquesLack of alignment between how today’s students think and workvs. practice and products used to support their learningDifficulty of deep reform without a shared vision of a neweducation model
  35. 35. Critical ChallengesNeed for training in digital literacy skills and techniquesLack of alignment between how today’s students think and workvs. practice and products used to support their learningDifficulty of deep reform without a shared vision of a neweducation modelResistance to change in an established system
  36. 36. Critical ChallengesNeed for training in digital literacy skills and techniquesLack of alignment between how today’s students think and workvs. practice and products used to support their learningDifficulty of deep reform without a shared vision of a neweducation modelResistance to change in an established systemDisconnect between student’s learning experiences inside andoutside the classroom
  37. 37. TIME TO ADOPTION - ONE YEAR OR LESS:Cloud Computing
  38. 38. Benefits of Cloud ComputingTools that can scale on demand when needed and scale back toconserve resources when usage drops
  39. 39. Benefits of Cloud ComputingTools that can scale on demand when needed and scale back toconserve resources when usage dropsInexpensive online storage
  40. 40. Benefits of Cloud ComputingTools that can scale on demand when needed and scale back toconserve resources when usage dropsInexpensive online storageCost savings for IT support, hardware and software
  41. 41. Benefits of Cloud ComputingTools that can scale on demand when needed and scale back toconserve resources when usage dropsInexpensive online storageCost savings for IT support, hardware and softwareAccess to services/tools without additional infrastructureinvestment
  42. 42. Benefits of Cloud ComputingTools that can scale on demand when needed and scale back toconserve resources when usage dropsInexpensive online storageCost savings for IT support, hardware and softwareAccess to services/tools without additional infrastructureinvestmentAccess possible from range of devices
  43. 43. TIME TO ADOPTION - ONE YEAR OR LESS:CollaborativeEnvironments
  44. 44. Benefits of Collaborative Environments Support user-created content
  45. 45. Benefits of Collaborative Environments Support user-created content Facilitate communication and sharing of created or existing content
  46. 46. Benefits of Collaborative Environments Support user-created content Facilitate communication and sharing of created or existing content Support and reinforce 21st century skills
  47. 47. Benefits of Collaborative Environments Support user-created content Facilitate communication and sharing of created or existing content Support and reinforce 21st century skills Can connect educators and students with peers worldwide, broadening perspectives and supporting those with shared interests
  48. 48. TIME TO ADOPTION - TWO TO THREE YEARS:Game-Based Learning
  49. 49. Benefits of Game-Based LearningProvides digital environments for learning that are familiar tostudents
  50. 50. Benefits of Game-Based LearningProvides digital environments for learning that are familiar tostudentsEngages students—all ages and both genders
  51. 51. Benefits of Game-Based LearningProvides digital environments for learning that are familiar tostudentsEngages students—all ages and both gendersSupports 21st century skill acquisition
  52. 52. Benefits of Game-Based LearningProvides digital environments for learning that are familiar tostudentsEngages students—all ages and both gendersSupports 21st century skill acquisitionCan be used for skill building, fostering discussion and teambuilding
  53. 53. Benefits of Game-Based LearningProvides digital environments for learning that are familiar tostudentsEngages students—all ages and both gendersSupports 21st century skill acquisitionCan be used for skill building, fostering discussion and teambuildingHas research-based evidence of its positive value for learning
  54. 54. TIME TO ADOPTION - TWO TO THREE YEARS:Mobiles
  55. 55. Benefits of MobilesAddress increasing desire and need for anytime, anywhere access
  56. 56. Benefits of MobilesAddress increasing desire and need for anytime, anywhere accessHelp manage personal information, collaboration, access to andsharing of files/information, monitoring social networks
  57. 57. Benefits of MobilesAddress increasing desire and need for anytime, anywhere accessHelp manage personal information, collaboration, access to andsharing of files/information, monitoring social networksCan store and display full-length books
  58. 58. Benefits of MobilesAddress increasing desire and need for anytime, anywhere accessHelp manage personal information, collaboration, access to andsharing of files/information, monitoring social networksCan store and display full-length booksAre more affordable, accessible and easier to use than desktop orlaptop computers
  59. 59. Benefits of MobilesAddress increasing desire and need for anytime, anywhere accessHelp manage personal information, collaboration, access to andsharing of files/information, monitoring social networksCan store and display full-length booksAre more affordable, accessible and easier to use than desktop orlaptop computersDo not have to be purchased or maintained by schools
  60. 60. TIME TO ADOPTION - FOUR TO FIVE YEARS:Augmented Reality
  61. 61. Benefits of Augmented RealitySimple and portable
  62. 62. Benefits of Augmented RealitySimple and portableCombines real world and virtual data
  63. 63. Benefits of Augmented RealitySimple and portableCombines real world and virtual dataCan provide powerful, contextual, real-world,discovery-based learning experiences
  64. 64. Benefits of Augmented RealitySimple and portableCombines real world and virtual dataCan provide powerful, contextual, real-world,discovery-based learning experiencesEngages and motivates students
  65. 65. TIME TO ADOPTION - FOUR TO FIVE YEARS:Flexible Displays
  66. 66. 0:35
  67. 67. Benefits of Flexible DisplaysCan be easily and inexpensively produced
  68. 68. Benefits of Flexible DisplaysCan be easily and inexpensively producedAre adaptable, allowing for printing on variousmaterials and surfaces and in various shapesand contours
  69. 69. Benefits of Flexible DisplaysCan be easily and inexpensively producedAre adaptable, allowing for printing on variousmaterials and surfaces and in various shapesand contoursWhen fully developed, will be smaller and moreportable, integrating context-specific datadisplays with everyday objects
  70. 70. Readings for Tutorial Week 7

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