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2139EPS09 L9
2139EPS09 L9
2139EPS09 L9
2139EPS09 L9
2139EPS09 L9
2139EPS09 L9
2139EPS09 L9
2139EPS09 L9
2139EPS09 L9
2139EPS09 L9
2139EPS09 L9
2139EPS09 L9
2139EPS09 L9
2139EPS09 L9
2139EPS09 L9
2139EPS09 L9
2139EPS09 L9
2139EPS09 L9
2139EPS09 L9
2139EPS09 L9
2139EPS09 L9
2139EPS09 L9
2139EPS09 L9
2139EPS09 L9
2139EPS09 L9
2139EPS09 L9
2139EPS09 L9
2139EPS09 L9
2139EPS09 L9
2139EPS09 L9
2139EPS09 L9
2139EPS09 L9
2139EPS09 L9
2139EPS09 L9
2139EPS09 L9
2139EPS09 L9
2139EPS09 L9
2139EPS09 L9
2139EPS09 L9
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2139EPS09 L9

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  • Slide 1 Show this slide as participants arrive.
  • This slide provides an overview of the five components of the QCAR Framework. The QCAR Framework consists of five components. These work together and are interrelated. The Framework is designed to support teachers and schools, and uphold the value of school-based curriculum development. It is intended to be a valuable resource to refine and enhance curriculum programs. Through the Essential Learnings, the Framework provides clarity for teachers about what to teach by clearly stating what is essential for students to know, understand and be able to do at specific junctures across the learning continuum.
  • This slide positions the QCAR Framework at the centre of the teaching and learning cycle, and illustrates how the components of the QCAR Framework can be embedded in teaching and learning processes. The Essential Learnings play an important role in supporting alignment in the teaching and learning cycle. The Essential Learnings support planning for schools with both KLA-based curriculum structures and those with integrated or trans-disciplinary structures, such as New Basics . When planning, teachers are encouraged to think about efficient ways to integrate the Essential Learnings within and across KLAs and programs in schools. Teachers should look for opportunities to connect the big ideas of the Essential Learnings rather than teaching each of the bullet points individually.
  • This slide provides an example of a unit planner. Using a planning template can promote a common understanding of curriculum expectations for teachers. It can be the first step in developing consistency of teacher judgments. Activity 2: Refer to Handouts 2 and 3. See Facilitator’s Guide. The unit planner ( Handout 2 ) is a template to help teachers focus on effective planning processes when developing units of work. The coloured ‘dots’ align sections of the planner with the five processes discussed in Slide 6 of this workshop. The template is accompanied by Handout 3: Planning checklist, which can be used to review existing units or support planning of new units of work. It uses the five processes and asks questions that guide teachers through the unit planner handout. The checklist ensures unit planning covers all the necessary areas of both curriculum planning and assessment development. The unit planner headings indicate considerations that should be the focus of planning when aiming to align curriculum, assessment and reporting.
  • This slide elaborates on the process: ‘ Identify curriculum’. ‘ Identify curriculum’ means select the focus or intent of the unit of work. This involves selecting the relevant Essential Learnings and the school priorities around which the unit of work will be developed. It also focuses on the context for learning as integral to establishing a unit of work that is relevant to students.
  • This slide shows the three parts of the Essential Learnings that should be considered to ‘ Identify curriculum’ . These three parts of the Essential Learnings have distinct and important roles, and together they help teachers plan curriculum. Each part of the Essential Learnings should inform the development of a unit of work. Activity 3a: See Facilitator’s Guide . Important messages from the Essential Learnings underpin curriculum planning. These messages are found in: 1. the Learning and assessment focus statement that provides an overview of the: orientation of the curriculum in the KLA by the end of Years 3, 5, 7 and 9 ways students learn in the KLA – i.e. through investigations, use of tools and technologies importance of using Ways of working (processes) together with Knowledge and understanding (concepts, facts and procedures of the KLA) assessable elements of the KLA. 2. the Ways of working, which describe the set of processes students use to develop and demonstrate their knowledge and understanding , including higher order thinking skills and capabilities. 3. Knowledge and understanding, which describes essential concepts, facts and procedures of the KLA that all students should have opportunities to learn. Knowledge and understanding is organised under headings that relate to the broad conceptual categories that are the focus of the KLA. Conceptual statements are presented in bold text. These describe the essential concepts or big ideas of the KLAs. Maintaining a focus on the conceptual statements when planning a unit helps to ensure that the unit focuses on students building conceptual understandings. Where statements contain the word “including”, schools should ensure that these are a component of their planned curriculum. The examples are not mandatory and have been included to clarify the intent of the statements. When planning, teachers are encouraged to think about efficient ways to integrate the concepts within and across KLAs – i.e. efficient ways to connect the big ideas of the Essential Learnings rather than teaching each of the bullet points individually.
  • This slide illustrates factors that influence the context for a unit of work. Activity 3b: See Facilitator’s guide . When planning units of work, it is important that the focus or context for learning connects with issues of personal or social relevance to students e.g. healthy lifestyles, sustainability and community participation. The context should also take into account students’ needs and prior learning. While the Essential Learnings highlight what students should know, understand and be able to do, they can be contextualised to be responsive to the interests, prior learning and needs of students. Where appropriate, contexts for learning can be negotiated with students in order to ensure that the contexts are authentic for students. This means that, as Newmann & Wehlage (1993) propose, learning activities need to be closely related to their context of use, to facilitate their application in everyday situations beyond school. Newman and Wehlage (1993) also argue that there are two key problems with some school experiences – that the work students do: often does not allow students to actively engage in thinking often has no intrinsic meaning or value to students beyond achieving success in school. Therefore it is important to actively engage students in learning that is relevant to, and of interest to them. This diagram shows that while the context for learning influences the selection of Essential Learnings in the planning process, the Essential Learnings support the development of learning and teaching as well as the choice of assessments. When planning a unit of work, setting the Essential Learnings within a context supports the development of aligned learning activities, teaching strategies, and assessment. These assessment choices within a unit include deciding what assessments will be used and what evidence will be looked for in student work.
  • This slide provides an example of a unit planner. Using a planning template can promote a common understanding of curriculum expectations for teachers. It can be the first step in developing consistency of teacher judgments. Activity 2: Refer to Handouts 2 and 3. See Facilitator’s Guide. The unit planner ( Handout 2 ) is a template to help teachers focus on effective planning processes when developing units of work. The coloured ‘dots’ align sections of the planner with the five processes discussed in Slide 6 of this workshop. The template is accompanied by Handout 3: Planning checklist, which can be used to review existing units or support planning of new units of work. It uses the five processes and asks questions that guide teachers through the unit planner handout. The checklist ensures unit planning covers all the necessary areas of both curriculum planning and assessment development. The unit planner headings indicate considerations that should be the focus of planning when aiming to align curriculum, assessment and reporting.
  • This slide provides an example of a unit planner. Using a planning template can promote a common understanding of curriculum expectations for teachers. It can be the first step in developing consistency of teacher judgments. Activity 2: Refer to Handouts 2 and 3. See Facilitator’s Guide. The unit planner ( Handout 2 ) is a template to help teachers focus on effective planning processes when developing units of work. The coloured ‘dots’ align sections of the planner with the five processes discussed in Slide 6 of this workshop. The template is accompanied by Handout 3: Planning checklist, which can be used to review existing units or support planning of new units of work. It uses the five processes and asks questions that guide teachers through the unit planner handout. The checklist ensures unit planning covers all the necessary areas of both curriculum planning and assessment development. The unit planner headings indicate considerations that should be the focus of planning when aiming to align curriculum, assessment and reporting.
  • This slide elaborates on the process: ‘Sequence learning’. The Essential Learnings and Standards support the active engagement of students in their own learning. If students are to learn effectively, learning experiences and teaching strategies need to be selected and sequenced to support active engagement in learning and intellectual challenge. The sequence of learning should also bring together the Ways of working with Knowledge and understanding , providing opportunities for students to both acquire and transform knowledge. Activity 3c: See Facilitator’s Guide . Information relevant to the activity: Learning experiences and teaching strategies need to have explicit links to the Essential Learnings (that are the focus of the unit of work) so that students have opportunities to develop and demonstrate the processes (described in the Ways of Working ), and the concepts, facts and procedures (described in Knowledge and understanding ). Teachers may choose to use an inquiry model to frame the teaching strategies and learning experiences. Such models support active engagement/student-centred approaches to learning. Inquiry models typically include four broad phases: establishing what is to be investigated finding out – gathering, analysing and evaluating information and evidence deciding what to do with what has been found out reflecting.
  • This slide provides an example of a unit planner. Using a planning template can promote a common understanding of curriculum expectations for teachers. It can be the first step in developing consistency of teacher judgments. Activity 2: Refer to Handouts 2 and 3. See Facilitator’s Guide. The unit planner ( Handout 2 ) is a template to help teachers focus on effective planning processes when developing units of work. The coloured ‘dots’ align sections of the planner with the five processes discussed in Slide 6 of this workshop. The template is accompanied by Handout 3: Planning checklist, which can be used to review existing units or support planning of new units of work. It uses the five processes and asks questions that guide teachers through the unit planner handout. The checklist ensures unit planning covers all the necessary areas of both curriculum planning and assessment development. The unit planner headings indicate considerations that should be the focus of planning when aiming to align curriculum, assessment and reporting.
  • This slide provides an example of a unit planner. Using a planning template can promote a common understanding of curriculum expectations for teachers. It can be the first step in developing consistency of teacher judgments. Activity 2: Refer to Handouts 2 and 3. See Facilitator’s Guide. The unit planner ( Handout 2 ) is a template to help teachers focus on effective planning processes when developing units of work. The coloured ‘dots’ align sections of the planner with the five processes discussed in Slide 6 of this workshop. The template is accompanied by Handout 3: Planning checklist, which can be used to review existing units or support planning of new units of work. It uses the five processes and asks questions that guide teachers through the unit planner handout. The checklist ensures unit planning covers all the necessary areas of both curriculum planning and assessment development. The unit planner headings indicate considerations that should be the focus of planning when aiming to align curriculum, assessment and reporting.
  • This slide elaborates on the process: ‘Sequence learning’. The Essential Learnings and Standards support the active engagement of students in their own learning. If students are to learn effectively, learning experiences and teaching strategies need to be selected and sequenced to support active engagement in learning and intellectual challenge. The sequence of learning should also bring together the Ways of working with Knowledge and understanding , providing opportunities for students to both acquire and transform knowledge. Activity 3c: See Facilitator’s Guide . Information relevant to the activity: Learning experiences and teaching strategies need to have explicit links to the Essential Learnings (that are the focus of the unit of work) so that students have opportunities to develop and demonstrate the processes (described in the Ways of Working ), and the concepts, facts and procedures (described in Knowledge and understanding ). Teachers may choose to use an inquiry model to frame the teaching strategies and learning experiences. Such models support active engagement/student-centred approaches to learning. Inquiry models typically include four broad phases: establishing what is to be investigated finding out – gathering, analysing and evaluating information and evidence deciding what to do with what has been found out reflecting.
  • This slide provides an example of a unit planner. Using a planning template can promote a common understanding of curriculum expectations for teachers. It can be the first step in developing consistency of teacher judgments. Activity 2: Refer to Handouts 2 and 3. See Facilitator’s Guide. The unit planner ( Handout 2 ) is a template to help teachers focus on effective planning processes when developing units of work. The coloured ‘dots’ align sections of the planner with the five processes discussed in Slide 6 of this workshop. The template is accompanied by Handout 3: Planning checklist, which can be used to review existing units or support planning of new units of work. It uses the five processes and asks questions that guide teachers through the unit planner handout. The checklist ensures unit planning covers all the necessary areas of both curriculum planning and assessment development. The unit planner headings indicate considerations that should be the focus of planning when aiming to align curriculum, assessment and reporting.
  • This slide provides an example of a unit planner. Using a planning template can promote a common understanding of curriculum expectations for teachers. It can be the first step in developing consistency of teacher judgments. Activity 2: Refer to Handouts 2 and 3. See Facilitator’s Guide. The unit planner ( Handout 2 ) is a template to help teachers focus on effective planning processes when developing units of work. The coloured ‘dots’ align sections of the planner with the five processes discussed in Slide 6 of this workshop. The template is accompanied by Handout 3: Planning checklist, which can be used to review existing units or support planning of new units of work. It uses the five processes and asks questions that guide teachers through the unit planner handout. The checklist ensures unit planning covers all the necessary areas of both curriculum planning and assessment development. The unit planner headings indicate considerations that should be the focus of planning when aiming to align curriculum, assessment and reporting.
  • This slide acknowledges the beginning of the process: ‘Develop assessment’. To begin planning assessment, teachers need to look back at the learning sequence to ensure that they have adequately catered for the assessments needed to provide evidence of learning by the students. Activity 4: See Facilitator’s Guide. In developing assessments, teachers need to ask themselves: How will I know whether the learning has been achieved? How do I evaluate the learning? Understanding and using the Standards and the assessable elements is crucial to this process, and integral to the alignment of curriculum, assessment and reporting. For teachers, parents and students, the Standards and assessable elements provide a common language for describing the quality of student achievement. The Standards describe how well a student has demonstrated their learning (what they know, understand and can do) through a collection of evidence. The Standards are the same for all key learning areas. They can be referred to as 'achievement standards' because they distinguish between the degrees of quality in student work. They are linked to the Essential Learnings . Quality assessment is evaluated in relation to: credibility intellectual quality authenticity user friendliness. Activity 5: See Facilitator’s Guide.
  • This slide shows the three parts of the Essential Learnings that should be considered to ‘ Identify curriculum’ . These three parts of the Essential Learnings have distinct and important roles, and together they help teachers plan curriculum. Each part of the Essential Learnings should inform the development of a unit of work. Activity 3a: See Facilitator’s Guide . Important messages from the Essential Learnings underpin curriculum planning. These messages are found in: 1. the Learning and assessment focus statement that provides an overview of the: orientation of the curriculum in the KLA by the end of Years 3, 5, 7 and 9 ways students learn in the KLA – i.e. through investigations, use of tools and technologies importance of using Ways of working (processes) together with Knowledge and understanding (concepts, facts and procedures of the KLA) assessable elements of the KLA. 2. the Ways of working, which describe the set of processes students use to develop and demonstrate their knowledge and understanding , including higher order thinking skills and capabilities. 3. Knowledge and understanding, which describes essential concepts, facts and procedures of the KLA that all students should have opportunities to learn. Knowledge and understanding is organised under headings that relate to the broad conceptual categories that are the focus of the KLA. Conceptual statements are presented in bold text. These describe the essential concepts or big ideas of the KLAs. Maintaining a focus on the conceptual statements when planning a unit helps to ensure that the unit focuses on students building conceptual understandings. Where statements contain the word “including”, schools should ensure that these are a component of their planned curriculum. The examples are not mandatory and have been included to clarify the intent of the statements. When planning, teachers are encouraged to think about efficient ways to integrate the concepts within and across KLAs – i.e. efficient ways to connect the big ideas of the Essential Learnings rather than teaching each of the bullet points individually.
  • This slide provides an overview of the five components of the QCAR Framework. The QCAR Framework consists of five components. These work together and are interrelated. The Framework is designed to support teachers and schools, and uphold the value of school-based curriculum development. It is intended to be a valuable resource to refine and enhance curriculum programs. Through the Essential Learnings, the Framework provides clarity for teachers about what to teach by clearly stating what is essential for students to know, understand and be able to do at specific junctures across the learning continuum.
  • This slide positions QCATs within the assessment continuum. Handout 1: See Facilitator’s Guide. Ways of collecting evidence of student learning vary greatly — from short-answer tests to student portfolios. QCATs are performance-based, authentic assessment tasks. Performance-based assessment involves students demonstrating or applying their skills and knowledge through undertaking meaningful tasks. Authentic assessment involves students using relevant and useful knowledge, thinking and practical skills to create a product or response to a meaningful problem. QCATs are both performance-based and authentic assessment tasks because they: are based directly on the curriculum expectations of the targeted Essential Learnings encompass both Ways of working and Knowledge and understanding require students to integrate their knowledge and skills in meaningful learning experiences give students the opportunity to demonstrate the transfer of knowledge and skills into a context other than that in which the knowledge was acquired. The development of QCATs has been supported by positive feedback which included the following responses: teachers liked the fact that the assessments were not tests teachers said the assessment tasks were not ‘scary’ for their students teachers liked the scaffolded approach in assessment tasks teachers felt that they were trusted as professionals teachers valued the opportunity to talk about their students’ learning with colleagues students valued their teachers’ support students enjoyed the meaningful contexts of the tasks.
  • This slide elaborates on the process: ‘ Identify curriculum’. ‘ Identify curriculum’ means select the focus or intent of the unit of work. This involves selecting the relevant Essential Learnings and the school priorities around which the unit of work will be developed. It also focuses on the context for learning as integral to establishing a unit of work that is relevant to students.
  • This slide provides an example of a unit planner. Using a planning template can promote a common understanding of curriculum expectations for teachers. It can be the first step in developing consistency of teacher judgments. Activity 2: Refer to Handouts 2 and 3. See Facilitator’s Guide. The unit planner ( Handout 2 ) is a template to help teachers focus on effective planning processes when developing units of work. The coloured ‘dots’ align sections of the planner with the five processes discussed in Slide 6 of this workshop. The template is accompanied by Handout 3: Planning checklist, which can be used to review existing units or support planning of new units of work. It uses the five processes and asks questions that guide teachers through the unit planner handout. The checklist ensures unit planning covers all the necessary areas of both curriculum planning and assessment development. The unit planner headings indicate considerations that should be the focus of planning when aiming to align curriculum, assessment and reporting.
  • This slide elaborates on the process: ‘ Identify curriculum’. ‘ Identify curriculum’ means select the focus or intent of the unit of work. This involves selecting the relevant Essential Learnings and the school priorities around which the unit of work will be developed. It also focuses on the context for learning as integral to establishing a unit of work that is relevant to students.
  • This slide provides an example of a unit planner. Using a planning template can promote a common understanding of curriculum expectations for teachers. It can be the first step in developing consistency of teacher judgments. Activity 2: Refer to Handouts 2 and 3. See Facilitator’s Guide. The unit planner ( Handout 2 ) is a template to help teachers focus on effective planning processes when developing units of work. The coloured ‘dots’ align sections of the planner with the five processes discussed in Slide 6 of this workshop. The template is accompanied by Handout 3: Planning checklist, which can be used to review existing units or support planning of new units of work. It uses the five processes and asks questions that guide teachers through the unit planner handout. The checklist ensures unit planning covers all the necessary areas of both curriculum planning and assessment development. The unit planner headings indicate considerations that should be the focus of planning when aiming to align curriculum, assessment and reporting.
  • Transcript

    • 1. 2139EPS Technology Education Lecture 9 Unit Planning
    • 2.  
    • 3.  
    • 4.  
    • 5.  
    • 6.  
    • 7.  
    • 8.  
    • 9.  
    • 10. School name: ___________________________ Unit title: KLAs: Year levels: Duration of unit: <ul><li>Identify curriculum </li></ul>Ways of working Knowledge and understanding Context for learning School priorities <ul><li>Sequence learning </li></ul>Learning experiences and teaching strategies Adjustments for the needs of learners Resources <ul><li>Develop assessment </li></ul><ul><li>Make judgments </li></ul>Type of assessment What will be assessed When will it be assessed Purpose of assessment Assessable elements <ul><li>Use feedback </li></ul>Ways to monitor learning and assessment
    • 11.  
    • 12. Knowledge and understanding Describes essential concepts, facts and procedures of the KLA. Ways of working Describes the essential processes that students use to develop and demonstrate their knowledge and understanding. Learning and assessment focus Describes the focus of learning and assessment within the juncture.
    • 13. Essential Learnings Learning and teaching Assessment Context
    • 14. School name: ___________________________ Unit title: KLAs: Year levels: Duration of unit: <ul><li>Identify curriculum </li></ul>Ways of working Knowledge and understanding Context for learning School priorities <ul><li>Sequence learning </li></ul>Learning experiences and teaching strategies Adjustments for the needs of learners Resources <ul><li>Develop assessment </li></ul><ul><li>Make judgments </li></ul>Type of assessment What will be assessed When will it be assessed Purpose of assessment Assessable elements <ul><li>Use feedback </li></ul>Ways to monitor learning and assessment
    • 15. School name: ___________________________ Unit title: KLAs: Year levels: Duration of unit: <ul><li>Identify curriculum </li></ul>Ways of working Knowledge and understanding Context for learning School priorities <ul><li>Sequence learning </li></ul>Learning experiences and teaching strategies Adjustments for the needs of learners Resources <ul><li>Develop assessment </li></ul><ul><li>Make judgments </li></ul>Type of assessment What will be assessed When will it be assessed Purpose of assessment Assessable elements <ul><li>Use feedback </li></ul>Ways to monitor learning and assessment
    • 16.  
    • 17. School name: ___________________________ Unit title: KLAs: Year levels: Duration of unit: <ul><li>Identify curriculum </li></ul>Ways of working Knowledge and understanding Context for learning School priorities <ul><li>Sequence learning </li></ul>Learning experiences and teaching strategies Adjustments for the needs of learners Resources <ul><li>Develop assessment </li></ul><ul><li>Make judgments </li></ul>Type of assessment What will be assessed When will it be assessed Purpose of assessment Assessable elements <ul><li>Use feedback </li></ul>Ways to monitor learning and assessment
    • 18. School name: ___________________________ Unit title: KLAs: Year levels: Duration of unit: <ul><li>Identify curriculum </li></ul>Ways of working Knowledge and understanding Context for learning School priorities <ul><li>Sequence learning </li></ul>Learning experiences and teaching strategies Adjustments for the needs of learners Resources <ul><li>Develop assessment </li></ul><ul><li>Make judgments </li></ul>Type of assessment What will be assessed When will it be assessed Purpose of assessment Assessable elements <ul><li>Use feedback </li></ul>Ways to monitor learning and assessment
    • 19.  
    • 20. School name: ___________________________ Unit title: KLAs: Year levels: Duration of unit: <ul><li>Identify curriculum </li></ul>Ways of working Knowledge and understanding Context for learning School priorities <ul><li>Sequence learning </li></ul>Learning experiences and teaching strategies Adjustments for the needs of learners Resources <ul><li>Develop assessment </li></ul><ul><li>Make judgments </li></ul>Type of assessment What will be assessed When will it be assessed Purpose of assessment Assessable elements <ul><li>Use feedback </li></ul>Ways to monitor learning and assessment
    • 21. School name: ___________________________ Unit title: KLAs: Year levels: Duration of unit: <ul><li>Identify curriculum </li></ul>Ways of working Knowledge and understanding Context for learning School priorities <ul><li>Sequence learning </li></ul>Learning experiences and teaching strategies Adjustments for the needs of learners Resources <ul><li>Develop assessment </li></ul><ul><li>Make judgments </li></ul>Type of assessment What will be assessed When will it be assessed Purpose of assessment Assessable elements <ul><li>Use feedback </li></ul>Ways to monitor learning and assessment
    • 22.  
    • 23.  
    • 24.  
    • 25.  
    • 26.  
    • 27. Knowledge and understanding Describes essential concepts, facts and procedures of the KLA. Ways of working Describes the essential processes that students use to develop and demonstrate their knowledge and understanding. Learning and assessment focus Describes the focus of learning and assessment within the juncture.
    • 28.  
    • 29.  
    • 30.  
    • 31.  
    • 32.  
    • 33. School name: ___________________________ Unit title: KLAs: Year levels: Duration of unit: <ul><li>Identify curriculum </li></ul>Ways of working Knowledge and understanding Context for learning School priorities <ul><li>Sequence learning </li></ul>Learning experiences and teaching strategies Adjustments for the needs of learners Resources <ul><li>Develop assessment </li></ul><ul><li>Make judgments </li></ul>Type of assessment What will be assessed When will it be assessed Purpose of assessment Assessable elements <ul><li>Use feedback </li></ul>Ways to monitor learning and assessment
    • 34.  
    • 35. School name: ___________________________ Unit title: KLAs: Year levels: Duration of unit: <ul><li>Identify curriculum </li></ul>Ways of working Knowledge and understanding Context for learning School priorities <ul><li>Sequence learning </li></ul>Learning experiences and teaching strategies Adjustments for the needs of learners Resources <ul><li>Develop assessment </li></ul><ul><li>Make judgments </li></ul>Type of assessment What will be assessed When will it be assessed Purpose of assessment Assessable elements <ul><li>Use feedback </li></ul>Ways to monitor learning and assessment
    • 36.  
    • 37.  
    • 38.  
    • 39.  

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