2139EPS Technology Education 09S2L11

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Common Assessment Tasks

Common Assessment Tasks

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  • Slide 1 Show this slide as participants arrive.
  • This slide elaborates on the process: ‘Sequence learning’. The Essential Learnings and Standards support the active engagement of students in their own learning. If students are to learn effectively, learning experiences and teaching strategies need to be selected and sequenced to support active engagement in learning and intellectual challenge. The sequence of learning should also bring together the Ways of working with Knowledge and understanding , providing opportunities for students to both acquire and transform knowledge. Activity 3c: See Facilitator’s Guide . Information relevant to the activity: Learning experiences and teaching strategies need to have explicit links to the Essential Learnings (that are the focus of the unit of work) so that students have opportunities to develop and demonstrate the processes (described in the Ways of Working ), and the concepts, facts and procedures (described in Knowledge and understanding ). Teachers may choose to use an inquiry model to frame the teaching strategies and learning experiences. Such models support active engagement/student-centred approaches to learning. Inquiry models typically include four broad phases: establishing what is to be investigated finding out – gathering, analysing and evaluating information and evidence deciding what to do with what has been found out reflecting.
  • This slide provides an overview of the five components of the QCAR Framework. The QCAR Framework consists of five components. These work together and are interrelated. The Framework is designed to support teachers and schools, and uphold the value of school-based curriculum development. It is intended to be a valuable resource to refine and enhance curriculum programs. Through the Essential Learnings, the Framework provides clarity for teachers about what to teach by clearly stating what is essential for students to know, understand and be able to do at specific junctures across the learning continuum.
  • This slide positions QCATs within the assessment continuum. Handout 1: See Facilitator’s Guide. Ways of collecting evidence of student learning vary greatly — from short-answer tests to student portfolios. QCATs are performance-based, authentic assessment tasks. Performance-based assessment involves students demonstrating or applying their skills and knowledge through undertaking meaningful tasks. Authentic assessment involves students using relevant and useful knowledge, thinking and practical skills to create a product or response to a meaningful problem. QCATs are both performance-based and authentic assessment tasks because they: are based directly on the curriculum expectations of the targeted Essential Learnings encompass both Ways of working and Knowledge and understanding require students to integrate their knowledge and skills in meaningful learning experiences give students the opportunity to demonstrate the transfer of knowledge and skills into a context other than that in which the knowledge was acquired. The development of QCATs has been supported by positive feedback which included the following responses: teachers liked the fact that the assessments were not tests teachers said the assessment tasks were not ‘scary’ for their students teachers liked the scaffolded approach in assessment tasks teachers felt that they were trusted as professionals teachers valued the opportunity to talk about their students’ learning with colleagues students valued their teachers’ support students enjoyed the meaningful contexts of the tasks.
  • This slide elaborates on the process: ‘ Identify curriculum’. ‘ Identify curriculum’ means select the focus or intent of the unit of work. This involves selecting the relevant Essential Learnings and the school priorities around which the unit of work will be developed. It also focuses on the context for learning as integral to establishing a unit of work that is relevant to students.
  • This slide elaborates on the process: ‘ Identify curriculum’. ‘ Identify curriculum’ means select the focus or intent of the unit of work. This involves selecting the relevant Essential Learnings and the school priorities around which the unit of work will be developed. It also focuses on the context for learning as integral to establishing a unit of work that is relevant to students.

Transcript

  • 1. 2139EPS Technology Education Lecture 11 Common Assessment Tasks
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  • 30. What is feedback?
  • 31. What is feedback? • Feedback is a way for students and teachers to inform future learning.
  • 32. What is feedback? • Feedback is a way for students and teachers to inform future learning. • Feedback is an opportunity for students to identify strengths and possible improvements in their work. It focuses on a student’s achievement of overall expectations and promotes a culture of school success.
  • 33. What is feedback? • Feedback is a way for students and teachers to inform future learning. • Feedback is an opportunity for students to identify strengths and possible improvements in their work. It focuses on a student’s achievement of overall expectations and promotes a culture of school success. • Feedback is also an opportunity for teachers to reflect on student learning and understanding, and to consider how to adjust instruction to meet student needs.
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  • 35. What is feedback? • Feedback is a way for students and teachers to inform future learning. • Feedback is an opportunity for students to identify strengths and possible improvements in their work. It focuses on a student’s achievement of overall expectations and promotes a culture of school success. • Feedback is also an opportunity for teachers to reflect on student learning and understanding, and to consider how to adjust instruction to meet student needs. • The role of the teacher is a coaching role — to reinforce what has been done correctly and focus students on improvement and success. • Feedback is essential — students and teachers both benefit from receiving information that helps them reflect on their role in learning.
  • 36. How can feedback be given to students? Feedback should come from a variety of sources and in a variety of forms:
  • 37. How can feedback be given to students? Feedback should come from a variety of sources and in a variety of forms: • Teachers: Teachers can ask questions or make comments that help students reflect on their learning.
  • 38. How can feedback be given to students? Feedback should come from a variety of sources and in a variety of forms: • Teachers: Teachers can ask questions or make comments that help students reflect on their learning. • Study guides: Teachers could make a simple self-help guide of common problems students might face completing a particular learning activity, with suggestions about how these might be solved.
  • 39. How can feedback be given to students? Feedback should come from a variety of sources and in a variety of forms: • Teachers: Teachers can ask questions or make comments that help students reflect on their learning. • Study guides: Teachers could make a simple self-help guide of common problems students might face completing a particular learning activity, with suggestions about how these might be solved. • Real audiences: Learning activities in real situations often provide immediate feedback — for example, a student speaking Chinese to a background speaker of Chinese will receive immediate feedback about whether they are understood.
  • 40. How can feedback be given to students? Feedback should come from a variety of sources and in a variety of forms: • Teachers: Teachers can ask questions or make comments that help students reflect on their learning. • Study guides: Teachers could make a simple self-help guide of common problems students might face completing a particular learning activity, with suggestions about how these might be solved. • Real audiences: Learning activities in real situations often provide immediate feedback — for example, a student speaking Chinese to a background speaker of Chinese will receive immediate feedback about whether they are understood . • ICT: Some computer programs and software applications can provide rapid, frequent and consistent feedback to students for particular learning activities.
  • 41. How can feedback be given to students? Feedback should come from a variety of sources and in a variety of forms: • Teachers: Teachers can ask questions or make comments that help students reflect on their learning. • Study guides: Teachers could make a simple self-help guide of common problems students might face completing a particular learning activity, with suggestions about how these might be solved. • Real audiences: Learning activities in real situations often provide immediate feedback — for example, a student speaking Chinese to a background speaker of Chinese will receive immediate feedback about whether they are understood. • ICT: Some computer programs and software applications can provide rapid, frequent and consistent feedback to students for particular learning activities. • Classmates: Encourage students to comment on classmates’ work using feedback frameworks and questionnaires.
  • 42. How can feedback be given to students? Feedback should come from a variety of sources and in a variety of forms: • Teachers: Teachers can ask questions or make comments that help students reflect on their learning. • Study guides: Teachers could make a simple self-help guide of common problems students might face completing a particular learning activity, with suggestions about how these might be solved. • Real audiences: Learning activities in real situations often provide immediate feedback — for example, a student speaking Chinese to a background speaker of Chinese will receive immediate feedback about whether they are understood. • ICT: Some computer programs and software applications can provide rapid, frequent and consistent feedback to students for particular learning activities. • Classmates: Encourage students to comment on classmates’ work using feedback frameworks and questionnaires. • Students: The goal of feedback is to help students become independent learners — students should have opportunities to record their own progress and monitor their own learning.
  • 43. When should feedback occur?
  • 44. When should feedback occur? Immediate feedback is best — the best feedback is ongoing and purposeful.
  • 45. What does good feedback to students look like?
  • 46. What does good feedback to students look like? • Assessment feedback goes beyond a simple mark or grade — comment on the strengths of students’ achievement grades and on the areas in need of improvement. Assessment feedback is more helpful if the specific elements of knowledge and skills are identified, and specific suggestions are provided.
  • 47. What does good feedback to students look like? • Assessment feedback goes beyond a simple mark or grade — comment on the strengths of students’ achievement grades and on the areas in need of improvement. Assessment feedback is more helpful if the specific elements of knowledge and skills are identified, and specific suggestions are provided. • All feedback should use descriptive language that helps students assess their progress and to understand how to achieve learning and assessment expectations.
  • 48. What does good feedback to students look like? • Assessment feedback goes beyond a simple mark or grade — comment on the strengths of students’ achievement grades and on the areas in need of improvement. Assessment feedback is more helpful if the specific elements of knowledge and skills are identified, and specific suggestions are provided. • All feedback should use descriptive language that helps students assess their progress and to understand how to achieve learning and assessment expectations. • Feedback involves students — they should have opportunities to ask follow-up questions, share their learning observations or experiences, compare opinions, and relate their learning to their lives outside school.
  • 49. What does good feedback to students look like? • Assessment feedback goes beyond a simple mark or grade — comment on the strengths of students’ achievement grades and on the areas in need of improvement. Assessment feedback is more helpful if the specific elements of knowledge and skills are identified, and specific suggestions are provided. • All feedback should use descriptive language that helps students assess their progress and to understand how to achieve learning and assessment expectations. • Feedback involves students — they should have opportunities to ask follow-up questions, share their learning observations or experiences, compare opinions, and relate their learning to their lives outside school. • When giving feedback, teachers should be focused on progress. Emphasise the student’s continuous progress relative to their previous achievement and to the learning expectations — avoid comparing students with their classmates.
  • 50. What does good feedback to students look like? • Make feedback personal — excessive public feedback can create a competitive or ego-oriented classroom environment.
  • 51. What does good feedback to students look like? • Make feedback personal — excessive public feedback can create a competitive or ego-oriented classroom environment. • Vary the feedback — provide feedback in a number of ways (including verbal and written feedback) and use a variety of words to describe student work.
  • 52. What does good feedback to students look like? • Make feedback personal — excessive public feedback can create a competitive or ego-oriented classroom environment. • Vary the feedback — provide feedback in a number of ways (including verbal and written feedback) and use a variety of words to describe student work. • Praise is a powerful form of feedback.
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