2139 E P S Lecture 4

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  • 2139 E P S Lecture 4

    1. 1. <ul><li>Lecture 4 </li></ul>2139EPS Technology Education
    2. 2. Teachers
    3. 3. Reflections
    4. 4. Transfer <ul><li>Transfer during learning </li></ul><ul><li>Transfer of Learning </li></ul>
    5. 5. Types of transfer <ul><li>Positive transfer </li></ul><ul><li>Negative transfer </li></ul>
    6. 6. Never underestimate the power of transfer. Past learning always influences the acquisition of new learning.
    7. 8. Thematic units and an integrated curriculum enhance the transfer process.
    8. 9. CONTEXT and the degree of original learning
    9. 10. SIMILARITY
    10. 11. CRITICAL ATTRIBUTES
    11. 12. ASSOCIATION
    12. 14. Characteristics of learners in Technology <ul><ul><ul><li>Years 1 to 10 </li></ul></ul></ul>
    13. 15. Early primary learners Years 1 – 3 <ul><li>Students have gained a variety of experiences prior to coming to school. </li></ul><ul><li>Design experiences relate to the creation of a range of products using various construction materials. </li></ul>
    14. 16. Early primary learners Years 1 – 3 <ul><li>Fine motor skills are still developing. </li></ul><ul><li>Products designed and developed are interesting and innovative, if not always functional. </li></ul><ul><li>Design processes are very flexible. </li></ul><ul><li>Initial draft design ideas differ significantly from eventual products. </li></ul>
    15. 17. Early primary learners Years 1 – 3 <ul><li>Design tasks allow students to draw on information and knowledge they already have or can locate easily in the familiar environment of their school and classroom. </li></ul><ul><li>They design products predominantly for their own use and have some consideration of the needs of others. </li></ul>
    16. 18. Early primary learners Years 1 – 3 <ul><li>Students: </li></ul><ul><li>record their design ideas using simple annotated drawings </li></ul><ul><li>identify the basic features and functions of their products </li></ul><ul><li>compare their final products with their initial design ideas and discuss the reasons for any differences. </li></ul>
    17. 19. <ul><li>Information </li></ul><ul><li>Students: </li></ul><ul><li>identify different forms of information </li></ul><ul><li>use their understandings of the different purposes and forms of information to lay out and design information products for themselves and others. </li></ul>Early primary learners Years 1 – 3
    18. 20. Early primary learners Years 1 – 3 <ul><li>Materials </li></ul><ul><li>Students: </li></ul><ul><li>explore equipment and techniques and meaningfully manipulate materials to create a range of products . </li></ul>
    19. 21. Early primary learners Years 1 – 3 <ul><li>Systems </li></ul><ul><li>Students: </li></ul><ul><li>design and develop simple systems to carry out familiar tasks and describe the order of the components in familiar systems. </li></ul>
    20. 22. Middle primary learners Years 4 – 5 <ul><li>Students: </li></ul><ul><li>‘ work technologically’ to design products to meet their needs and the needs of others </li></ul><ul><li>work cooperatively to create shared designs </li></ul><ul><li>devise and follow production procedures to create products that reflect their design ideas. </li></ul>
    21. 23. Middle primary learners Years 4 – 5 <ul><li>Students: </li></ul><ul><li>recognise processes that they have used to design and develop their products </li></ul><ul><li>determine how they might alter these processes if they were undertaking the design task again </li></ul><ul><li>recognise that different solutions can be designed for, and are often used by, different users. </li></ul>
    22. 24. Middle primary learners Years 4 – 5 <ul><li>Middle primary learners recognise the need to draw on a range of resources to inform the design process. This may involve resources such as reference books, peers and the Internet. </li></ul>
    23. 25. Middle primary learners Years 4 – 5 <ul><li>Students: </li></ul><ul><li>judge the effectiveness of their own and others’ products and processes </li></ul><ul><li>record their ideas in a Technology project folio that contains information about progressive design and development of their products. </li></ul>
    24. 26. <ul><li>Information </li></ul><ul><li>Students: </li></ul><ul><li>describe the advantages and disadvantages of different forms and sources of information </li></ul><ul><li>generate, modify and present information for different purposes. </li></ul>Middle primary learners Years 4 – 5
    25. 27. Middle primary learners Years 4 – 5 <ul><li>Materials </li></ul><ul><li>Students: </li></ul><ul><li>select materials appropriate to their purpose according to characteristics that make the material better suited to their product. </li></ul>
    26. 28. Middle primary learners Years 4 – 5 <ul><li>Systems </li></ul><ul><li>Students: </li></ul><ul><li>describe the relationship between inputs, processes and outputs of systems and use this information as they assemble and trial systems of their own. </li></ul>
    27. 29. Upper primary learners Years 6 – 7 <ul><li>Students: </li></ul><ul><li>communicate their ideas using presentations, models and technical terms </li></ul><ul><li>consult with others to inform some of their design ideas </li></ul><ul><li>draw on the practical expertise of others to inform their design and construction processes. </li></ul>
    28. 30. Upper primary learners Years 6 – 7 <ul><li>Students: </li></ul><ul><li>identify and clarify the issues surrounding design challenges </li></ul><ul><li>research a range of alternative design ideas. </li></ul>
    29. 31. <ul><li>Information </li></ul><ul><li>Students: </li></ul><ul><li>analyse forms and sources of information </li></ul><ul><li>match information to design requirements </li></ul><ul><li>transform and transmit information to different audiences. </li></ul>Upper primary learners Years 6 – 7
    30. 32. Upper primary learners Years 6 – 7 <ul><li>Materials </li></ul><ul><li>Students: </li></ul><ul><li>understand and explain how the characteristics of the materials they have selected affect the ways in which the materials can be manipulated </li></ul><ul><li>draw on the practical knowledge of others to assist in the manipulation of materials to enhance their products. </li></ul>
    31. 33. Upper primary learners Years 6 – 7 <ul><li>Systems </li></ul><ul><li>Students: </li></ul><ul><li>explain the logic of the systems and subsystems they have created and incorporate feedback to refine and modify their systems. </li></ul>
    32. 34. Lower secondary learners Years 8 – 10 <ul><li>Students: </li></ul><ul><li>understand the significance of drawing together knowledge, ideas and data to inform their design process </li></ul><ul><li>recognise and analyse the links between knowledge, ideas and data gathered,and the design and development of appropriate new products. </li></ul>
    33. 35. Lower secondary learners Years 8 – 10 <ul><li>Students often work collaboratively in teams, sharing tasks and managing much of the design process independently of the teacher. They manage most aspects of the design and development process. </li></ul>
    34. 36. Lower secondary learners Years 8 – 10 <ul><li>Students focus on creating quality products that meet predetermined standards. </li></ul><ul><li>They negotiate and refine production procedures to meet detailed specifications and design requirements. </li></ul><ul><li>There is a strong relationship between their ideas and their eventual products. </li></ul>
    35. 37. Lower secondary learners Years 8 – 10 <ul><li>Students: </li></ul><ul><li>use predetermined criteria to make judgments about the appropriateness of the products and processes they used </li></ul><ul><li>make informed comparisons between their products and those that may be commercially available. </li></ul>
    36. 38. <ul><li>Information </li></ul><ul><li>Students: </li></ul><ul><li>explain how changes in forms, sources and the management of information affected the design and production decisions associated with the creation of information products </li></ul><ul><li>select appropriate ways of presenting information to specific users. </li></ul>Lower secondary learners Years 8 – 10
    37. 39. Lower secondary learners Years 8 – 10 <ul><li>Materials </li></ul><ul><li>Students: </li></ul><ul><li>compare different materials and select those that meet the predetermined criteria of their design challenge </li></ul><ul><li>manipulate materials to meet predetermined standards to ensure the needs of users are met and to assure the quality of the product. </li></ul>
    38. 40. Lower secondary learners Years 8 – 10 <ul><li>Systems </li></ul><ul><li>Students: </li></ul><ul><li>explain the structure, control and management of systems they have made and others have designed </li></ul><ul><li>incorporate a range of mechanisms to control and manage the operation of systems they have designed. </li></ul>
    39. 41. Beyond Level 6 <ul><li>Students are able to formally analyse knowledge, ideas and data in order to meet design challenges in innovative and enterprising ways. </li></ul><ul><li>They have the ability to undertake an in-depth analysis of the appropriateness of their products while making judgments about the feasibility and commercial potential of their design ideas, production processes and products. </li></ul>
    40. 42. <ul><li>Students are able to describe and capitalise on changes in society in innovative and enterprising ways in the areas of information, materials and systems. </li></ul>Beyond Level 6 They work from both an existing individual or community need, or investigate and create potential new opportunities through the creation of innovative and commercially feasible design ideas and products.
    41. 43. A DREAM       I DREAMED I STOOD IN A STUDIO AND WATCHED TWO SCULPTORS THERE,   THE CLAY THEY USED WAS A YOUNG CHILD'S MIND AND THEY FASHIONED IT WITH CARE.   ONE WAS A TEACHER, THE TOOLS HE USED WERE BOOKS AND MUSIC AND ART;   ONE A PARENT WITH A GUIDING HAND AND A GENTLE, LOVING HEART.   DAY AFTER DAY THE TEACHER TOILED WITH TOUCH THAT WAS DEFT AND SURE,   WHILE THE PARENT LABOURED BY HIS SIDE AND POLISHED AND SMOOTHED IT O'ER.   WHEN AT LAST THEIR WORK WAS DONE, THEY WERE PROUD OF WHAT THEY WROUGHT,   FOR THE THINGS THEY HAD MOULDED INTO THE CHILD COULD NEITHER BE SOLD NOR BOUGHT.   AND EACH AGREED THEY WOULD HAVE FAILED IF THEY HAD WORKED ALONE,   FOR BEHIND THE PARENT STOOD THE SCHOOL, AND BEHIND THE TEACHER THE HOME.     Anon

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