Your SlideShare is downloading. ×
  • Like
Identifying, quantifying and communicating the benefits of transboundary water cooperation
Upcoming SlideShare
Loading in...5
×

Thanks for flagging this SlideShare!

Oops! An error has occurred.

×

Now you can save presentations on your phone or tablet

Available for both IPhone and Android

Text the download link to your phone

Standard text messaging rates apply

Identifying, quantifying and communicating the benefits of transboundary water cooperation

  • 53 views
Published

Chantal Demilecamps. 7th GEF Biennial International Waters Conference. Oct 26-31, 2013 in Barbados.

Chantal Demilecamps. 7th GEF Biennial International Waters Conference. Oct 26-31, 2013 in Barbados.

Published in Technology , Business
  • Full Name Full Name Comment goes here.
    Are you sure you want to
    Your message goes here
    Be the first to comment
    Be the first to like this
No Downloads

Views

Total Views
53
On SlideShare
0
From Embeds
0
Number of Embeds
1

Actions

Shares
Downloads
0
Comments
0
Likes
0

Embeds 0

No embeds

Report content

Flagged as inappropriate Flag as inappropriate
Flag as inappropriate

Select your reason for flagging this presentation as inappropriate.

Cancel
    No notes for slide
  • Signed on 17 March 1992
    Entered into force on 6 October 1996
    Counts 39 Parties
    Amendments to allow accession to the Convention by all UN Member States entered into force in 2013. This turns the Water Convention into a global legal framework for transboundary water cooperation. Early 2014 (after the amendments become operational) countries from outside the ECE region shoud be able to join the Convention, with the same rights and responsibilities as existing Parties.
    The Convention has been into force for more than 15 years and has supported the development of transboundary agreements, the establishment of joint bodies and the strengthening of water cooperation at both technical and political levels.
    The Convention is based on three complementary and mutually sustaining obligations,
    THREE PILLARS:
    The obligation to take all appropriate measure to prevent control and reduce transboundary impacts.
    The obligation to ensure that transboundary waters are used in a reasonable and equitable way, so that all riparian should benefit from the water in an equitable manner, offering benefits and placing similar demands on both upstream and downstream countries.
    The obligation for riparian to cooperate through the establishment of agreements that foresee joint bodies responsible for joint management
    The translation in practice of the first 2 pillars can only be achieved through cooperation and agreement by riparian countries. The Convention fosters the establishment of legal and institutional mechanism and the implementation of agreements, but also to develop to adapt to possibly changing conditions.
    Consult and exchange of information
    Joint monitoring and assessment
    Elaborate joint objectives and concerted action programme for their shared waters
    The Convention takes a holistic approach based on the understanding that water resources play an integral part in ecosystems as well as in human societies and economies.
  • Programme of work of the Water Convention adopted at the sixth session of the Meeting of the Parties (Nov. 2012)
  • Programme of work of the Water Convention adopted at the sixth session of the Meeting of the Parties (Nov. 2012)
  • Stakeholders to involve: : water and environmental economists, practitioners, policy makers, water diplomats

Transcript

  • 1. Identifying, quantifying and communicating the benefits of transboundary water cooperation Chantal Demilecamps Secretariat of the Water Convention, UNECE
  • 2. Transboundary cooperation under the Water Convention • Protection of transboundary waters by preventing, controlling and reducing transboundary impacts • Reasonable and equitable use of transboundary waters • Obligation to cooperate through agreements and joint institutions => Objective: sustainable water management, looking at economic, social & environmental dimensions of water
  • 3. Identifying, quantifying & communicating the benefits of transboundary cooperation • Background Limited scope of cooperation Willigness to cooperate depends on perception of potential benefits Need for more qualitative & quantitative data on benefits • Objectives  Support countries to understand and estimate the full range of potential benefits of transboundary water cooperation  Encourage the broadening of cooperation
  • 4. Identifying, quantifying & communicating the benefits of transboundary cooperation • Methodology Development of a Policy Guidance Note on Identifying, Quantifying and Communicating the benefits of cooperation • Activities – Expert framing workshop (June 2013) – Workshop to gather & share experiences (22-23 May 2014) – Expert Workshop to finalize the policy guidance note and discuss next steps (Nov. 2014, tbc)  Contribute to the development of the Policy Guidance Note  Share experience during the Workshop in May 2014
  • 5. Structure of the Guidance Note • • • • • Executive Summary Ch1 – Setting the Context Ch2 – Identifying benefits Ch3 – Quantifying benefits Ch4 – Maximizing the policy impact of benefit assessment • Technical annexes
  • 6. DRAFT TYPOLOGY OF BENEFITS I. Benefits for the transboundary waters Environmental benefits (avoided habitat degradation and biodiversity loss) II. Benefits from the transboundary waters Improved human satisfaction (recreation, cultural values), improved health (reduced water-borne diseases), and direct economic benefits (increased economic production in sectors, reduced costs of carrying out productive activities, avoided losses from floods & droughts, increased value of properties) as a consequence of managing water better • Reduced costs (managing water, complying with treaties, defense spending) and improved benefits (in other policy areas) as a consequence of building trust between countries III. Benefits thanks to the transboundary waters IV. Benefits beyond the transboundary waters • Economic growth and poverty reduction generated by more cross-border investment and open markets for goods, services and labor (as a second order consequence of direct economic benefits and increased trust)
  • 7. Challenges of the work on benefits of cooperation • Need to build on existing knowledge and to bridge science and policy • Need to develop a policy-makers oriented guidance note, based on concrete experience (GEF projects) • Not all benefits can be valued: qualitative and quantitative information • Many tools and methodologies available for economic valuation, to be communicated in an easy way to influence the policy process • High request to develop guidance on valuation of benefits related to trust building
  • 8. Which benefits of transboundary water cooperation have you identified in your project? DRAFT TYPOLOGY OF BENEFITS I. Benefits for the transboundary waters Environmental benefits II. Benefits from the transboundary waters Consequences of managing water better, direct economic benefits III. Benefits thanks to the transboundary waters Consequences of building trust between countries IV. Benefits beyond the transboundary waters Economic growth and poverty reduction generated Have some benefits of transboundary water cooperation already been quantified? (in a qualitative or quantitative way)
  • 9.  In your projects, have benefits of transboundary water cooperation been communicated to influence the policy process? How?  How could we better communicate the benefits? How can the assessment of benefits be integrated into the policy process?
  • 10. Thank you! More information http://unece.org/env/water On the activities on quantifying the benefits of transboundary cooperation http://www.unece.org/env/water/ benefits_cooperation.html Chantal.Demilecamps@unece.org