'Blue Carbon+: Efforts to harness coastal and
marine ecosystem values for improved
ecosystem management
Experiences from t...
Building Blue Carbon Projects
Presentation agenda:
1. What is Blue Carbon & why is it
important?
2. What does a Blue Carbo...
What is Blue Carbon?
 A recent concept in marine conservation that advances the role
some coastal ecosystems play in stor...
What
is Blue
Carbon?
Annual mitigation
potential for all
three habitat types
is roughly between
300 and 900
million t carb...
Why Blue Carbon?
 These ecosystems are also vitally important to the livelihoods
of many in coastal communities around th...
Why Blue Carbon?
“Textbook” total ecosystem service values

- VS -

The values local users and communities place on these
...
Why Blue Carbon?

- Over 30 % of global mangroves are thought of as degraded
Why Blue Carbon?
• Healthy ecosystems store and sequester carbon
• Degraded ecosystems release carbon

iStockphoto
UNEP/GEF Blue Forests Project
Project under GEF-5 Work Programme
The Blue Forests Project is a UNEP proposal to implement
...
GEF
Blue
Forests
Project
Partners

•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•

UNEP
GRID-Arendal
UNEP-WCMC
Duke University
IUCN
B...
GEF Blue Forests Project
Blue Forests Project Components
Component 1 – development of guidance for implementation
Project-level support
Component 2...
The small-scale interventions

Madagascar – Ecuador – Mozambique – Indonesia – UAE
• Improved understanding
of carbon and ...
Options for improved ecosystem management through
• Carbon market or other payment for ecosystem service
• Conservation ag...
Abu Dhabi Blue Carbon Demonstration Project
• Abu-Dhabi Global Environmental Data Initiative
(AGEDI)
• GRID-Arendal, UNEP,...
Mangroves in UAE - A Unique Marine Ecosystem Legacy
• Recognizing the importance of mangrove ecosystem services, the
late ...
What does
a Blue Forests Blue Carbon+
Project look
like?
(Abu Dhabi
Blue Carbon
Demonstration
Project)
Baseline Carbon Assessment
• Conducted by local and international science team
Capacity building
• Local experts and management and blue carbon science
teams from Madagascar and Indonesia

Lessons lear...
Ecosystem Services Assessment
• Conducted by Forest trends
Policy Assessment
• Conducted by UNEP
Policy Assessment
Academic approach

~ Research > deliverable (report)

Abu Dhabi approach
• Consult with decision makers
...
Mikoko Pamoja - community-led mangrove carbon and
conservation project
• Kenya Marine and Fisheries Research Institute, Ea...
Mikoko Pamoja – Project timeline
June 2010

Approval of Project Idea Note (PIN).

July 2012

Validation of project (refore...
Negotiated
Financial
Flow of
Mikoko
Pamoja

External Buyer of the Carbon Credits
Estimated Income per year is $15,000 USD
...
Lessons learned and elements for success in 'bridging the gap‘
between valuation and policy making
• Consult with policy m...
Tussen takk!
Steven Lutz - steven.lutz@grida.no
Blue Carbon Portal - http://bluecarbonportal.org
Questions for facilitated discussion
- bridging the gap • Are there any other examples of successful efforts in
bridging t...
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Blue Carbon+: Efforts to harness coastal and marine ecosystem values for improved ecosystem management

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7th GEF Biennial International Waters Conference in Barbados Presentation on Experiences from the Abu Dhabi Blue Carbon Demonstration Project and the GEF/UNEP Blue Forests Project (PPG) by Steven Lutz

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  • Title: 'Blue Carbon+: Efforts to harness coastal and marine ecosystem values for improved ecosystem management'  
    Abstract:
    This case study considers efforts to harness the values of blue carbon and other ecosystem services (ES) for improved coastal ecosystem management. Blue carbon ecosystems include mangrove forests, sea grass meadows, and saltwater marshes, and blue carbon and the valuation of ES are new potential tools for improved coastal ecosystem management and policy makers. The presentation will examine introductory efforts to 'bridge the gap' between valuation and policy making through the use of blue carbon and ES values in the carbon market, conservation agreements or other mechanisms that recognize these values in policy and management. The presentation is based on lessons learned from the Abu Dhabi Blue Carbon Demonstration Project and the GEF/UNEP Blue Forests Project Preparation Grant phase.
  • Blue Carbon+: Efforts to harness coastal and marine ecosystem values for improved ecosystem management

    1. 1. 'Blue Carbon+: Efforts to harness coastal and marine ecosystem values for improved ecosystem management Experiences from the Abu Dhabi Blue Carbon Demonstration Project and the GEF/UNEP Blue Forests Project (PPG) Steven Lutz Garth Cripps, Blue Ventures
    2. 2. Building Blue Carbon Projects Presentation agenda: 1. What is Blue Carbon & why is it important? 2. What does a Blue Carbon / Blue Forests project look like? – Abu Dhabi Blue Carbon Demonstration Project – GEF Blue Forests Project – Mikoko Pajoma project 3. Lessons learned and key elements for ‘bridging the gap’
    3. 3. What is Blue Carbon?  A recent concept in marine conservation that advances the role some coastal ecosystems play in storing greenhouse gasses, thereby helping to mitigate climate change.  Blue carbon ecosystems include mangrove forests, seagrass meadows and saltwater marshlands.
    4. 4. What is Blue Carbon? Annual mitigation potential for all three habitat types is roughly between 300 and 900 million t carbon, approximately equal to the industry and energy emissions of Poland and Germany respectfully (Murray et al, 2011).
    5. 5. Why Blue Carbon?  These ecosystems are also vitally important to the livelihoods of many in coastal communities around the world, through the myriad of valuable ecosystem services they provide.
    6. 6. Why Blue Carbon? “Textbook” total ecosystem service values - VS - The values local users and communities place on these ecosystems.
    7. 7. Why Blue Carbon? - Over 30 % of global mangroves are thought of as degraded
    8. 8. Why Blue Carbon? • Healthy ecosystems store and sequester carbon • Degraded ecosystems release carbon iStockphoto
    9. 9. UNEP/GEF Blue Forests Project Project under GEF-5 Work Programme The Blue Forests Project is a UNEP proposal to implement better coastal ecosystem management by harnessing the values associated with carbon and ecosystem services at a number of demonstration sites throughout the globe. • • • • • $4.5m USD over 4 years Co-financing: over $23m USD Currently finalizing PPG phase FSP submission to GEF in Sept 2013 ‘Blue Forests’ = carbon & ecosystem services
    10. 10. GEF Blue Forests Project Partners • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • UNEP GRID-Arendal UNEP-WCMC Duke University IUCN Blue Ventures Conservation International WWF AGEDI Indonesia Ministry of Marine Affairs And Fisheries UNEP-ROLAC Kenya Marine and Fisheries Research Institute US Forest Service South African Institute of International Affairs The Ocean Foundation NOAA Stockholm University Charles Darwin University
    11. 11. GEF Blue Forests Project
    12. 12. Blue Forests Project Components Component 1 – development of guidance for implementation Project-level support Component 2 – application of Blue Forests Madagascar – Ecuador – Mozambique –Indonesia – UAE Kenya – Central America Component 3 – improved understanding Targeted research Component 4 – adoption of methodologies and approaches Policy and greater GEF IW and international application Component 5 – monitoring, networking and information sharing Project management
    13. 13. The small-scale interventions Madagascar – Ecuador – Mozambique – Indonesia – UAE • Improved understanding of carbon and ecosystem services for blue forests ecosystems • Improved capacity and ecosystem management for blue forests ecosystems
    14. 14. Options for improved ecosystem management through • Carbon market or other payment for ecosystem service • Conservation agreements - Incentives for conservation actions e.g., Change monofilament gillnets for lobster traps > market access or product certification • Recognition of carbon and ES in policy and management - Existing legislation related to environmental management or climate change - Commitments in biodiversity or climate change • Other mechanisms - Debt swap? - Specialized funds for development mitigation?
    15. 15. Abu Dhabi Blue Carbon Demonstration Project • Abu-Dhabi Global Environmental Data Initiative (AGEDI) • GRID-Arendal, UNEP, UNEP-WCMC, Forest Trends, expert science team • $1.8 USD million (%100 co-finance to the GEF Blue Forest Project) • Assess all three blue carbon ecosystems + ES • Nov. 2012- Dec. 2013 • Part of the Oceans and Blue Carbon Special Iniative
    16. 16. Mangroves in UAE - A Unique Marine Ecosystem Legacy • Recognizing the importance of mangrove ecosystem services, the late Sheikh Zayed initiated a massive mangrove forestation programme. • The UAE is one of the only countries in the world to experience a positive growth in area of mangrove cover • More than 75% of the total mangrove forest area in the UAE is located in Abu Dhabi.
    17. 17. What does a Blue Forests Blue Carbon+ Project look like? (Abu Dhabi Blue Carbon Demonstration Project)
    18. 18. Baseline Carbon Assessment • Conducted by local and international science team
    19. 19. Capacity building • Local experts and management and blue carbon science teams from Madagascar and Indonesia Lessons learned from the experience will help ‘safeguard the ecological goods and services critical to increasingly poor and vulnerable Malagasy coastal communities, while also safeguarding critical biodiversity.’ - Lalao Aigrette, Mangrove Field Scientist, Madagascar
    20. 20. Ecosystem Services Assessment • Conducted by Forest trends
    21. 21. Policy Assessment • Conducted by UNEP
    22. 22. Policy Assessment Academic approach ~ Research > deliverable (report) Abu Dhabi approach • Consult with decision makers - Decide on plan of action and target stakeholders & clear and consistent messaging • Consult with stakeholders • Bring stakeholders together - present preliminary results, engage discussion • Re-assess deliverable (policy options) • Consult and bring stakeholders together again - present final results, engage discussion
    23. 23. Mikoko Pamoja - community-led mangrove carbon and conservation project • Kenya Marine and Fisheries Research Institute, Earthwatch, Napier Uni. • Gazi Bay, Kenya (107ha, small-scale) • Considered co-finance to the GEF project (through KMFRI). • Certified under the Plan Vivo Standard A framework for supporting communities to manage their natural resources more sustainably, with a view to generating climate, livelihood, and ecosystem benefits through payments for ecosystem services (PES); in this case mangrove carbon. Background: Mangroves extensively degraded since the 1970’s, through commercial logging and land conversion. Impacts to local communities - shortages of firewood and building poles, decline in fisheries, and increased coastal erosion. Kairo, et al, in press (not for citation)
    24. 24. Mikoko Pamoja – Project timeline June 2010 Approval of Project Idea Note (PIN). July 2012 Validation of project (reforestation and avoided deforestation). . June 2013 Independent verification of project. Fall 2013 Payments expected to be realized *Once the Kenyan Government issues a Forest Management Agreement to the Gazi Bay community. Intended funder - AVIVA - British multinational insurance company headquartered in London, UK. It is the sixthlargest insurance company in the world. Kairo, et al, in press (not for citation)
    25. 25. Negotiated Financial Flow of Mikoko Pamoja External Buyer of the Carbon Credits Estimated Income per year is $15,000 USD Mikoko Pamoja Coordinating Group Kairo, et al, in press (not for citation) 3 % of Income Group Expenses (Stationery etc) 97 % of the Income Mikoko Pamoja Community Based Organization 33 % of Income Projects for Community Benefit. Expenditure determined through a community benefit consultation process 37 % of Income 25 % of Income 3 % of Income Project Coordinator Salary Group Expenses (Stationery etc) Mikoko Pamoja Work Teams Nursery establishment Mangrove policing Monitoring and Evaluation tasks
    26. 26. Lessons learned and elements for success in 'bridging the gap‘ between valuation and policy making • Consult with policy makers at the beginning - understand local demand and desired outcomes • Gain authority for project and your stakeholder engagement (political support) • Engage stakeholders through a continual consultation process • Effective communication key, especially clear messaging of scope of project and desired outcomes • An honest discussion of expectations and limitations (avoid overselling) • Policy engagement cannot be ignored!
    27. 27. Tussen takk! Steven Lutz - steven.lutz@grida.no Blue Carbon Portal - http://bluecarbonportal.org
    28. 28. Questions for facilitated discussion - bridging the gap • Are there any other examples of successful efforts in bridging the gap or key elements to consider that you would like to share with us? • What types of additional information and processes are necessary to bridge the gap? • What other types of information, in terms of human dimensions, should be considered in bridging the gap?

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