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CAMERA USE, BASICS
CAMERA USE, BASICS
CAMERA USE, BASICS
CAMERA USE, BASICS
CAMERA USE, BASICS
CAMERA USE, BASICS
CAMERA USE, BASICS
CAMERA USE, BASICS
CAMERA USE, BASICS
CAMERA USE, BASICS
CAMERA USE, BASICS
CAMERA USE, BASICS
CAMERA USE, BASICS
CAMERA USE, BASICS
CAMERA USE, BASICS
CAMERA USE, BASICS
CAMERA USE, BASICS
CAMERA USE, BASICS
CAMERA USE, BASICS
CAMERA USE, BASICS
CAMERA USE, BASICS
CAMERA USE, BASICS
CAMERA USE, BASICS
CAMERA USE, BASICS
CAMERA USE, BASICS
CAMERA USE, BASICS
CAMERA USE, BASICS
CAMERA USE, BASICS
CAMERA USE, BASICS
CAMERA USE, BASICS
CAMERA USE, BASICS
CAMERA USE, BASICS
CAMERA USE, BASICS
CAMERA USE, BASICS
CAMERA USE, BASICS
CAMERA USE, BASICS
CAMERA USE, BASICS
CAMERA USE, BASICS
CAMERA USE, BASICS
CAMERA USE, BASICS
CAMERA USE, BASICS
CAMERA USE, BASICS
CAMERA USE, BASICS
CAMERA USE, BASICS
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CAMERA USE, BASICS

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CAMERA USE, BASICS

CAMERA USE, BASICS

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  • These are the topics we will cover in this presentation
  • Lens focal length really tells us about the field-of-view of the lens – how wide it can see. Longer lenses have a narrower field-of-view, often referred to as FOV.
  • Lens choice has a big impact on the final image. It is one of the major advantages of SLR cameras over compacts.
    Here is the same scene photographed with lenses from the 15mm fisheye through to a 600mm.
  • This name or description of the lens tells you most things that you need to know about it:
    The Type of lens, e.g. EF or EF-S tells you what type of EOS body it will fit. EF lenses fit all EOS bodies but EF-S lenses fit only certain bodies such as the EOS 400D, 450D and 40D. Certain specialist lenses for extreme close up photography (macro photography) are designated MP and Tilt and Shift (TS-E) lenses are for architectural and studio photography.
    The Focal length is indicated in millimetres. A double number e.g. 100-400mm indicates the zoom range.
    The maximum aperture is indicated by its f/number. A double number e.g. f/4.5-5.6 means the maximum aperture varies according to the zoom position.
    L indicates an L Series lens. IS indicates Images Stabilizer function and USM stands for Ultra Sonic Motor – a very fast and silent form of autofocus motor.
  • Wide-angle lenses capture a wide view of the subject. They are useful for landscapes and range in focal length from 10mm to 35mm.
  • Standard lenses are so called as they used to be the ‘standard’ lens provided with a camera. The lenses range from 35-50mm and give a field-of-view similar to that of the human eye. They also give a natural perspective and do not distort subjects.
    Because they are similar to the human eye, they require extra input from the photographer to get the best from them and to find the best angles.
  • Telephoto lenses are used for everything from portraits to more distant subjects. They range in focal length from 50mm to 300mm.
    They have the effect of compressing perspective so subjects, such as mountains, can appear to be layered 2-dimensionally.
  • Super-telephoto lenses range from 400mm to 800mm. They are used for subjects you can not, or do not want, to get close to.
    They help isolate a subject from its surroundings and are mainly used by sports and wildlife photographers.
    Depth-of-field: The amount of the scene from front to back that is rendered acceptably sharp in the photograph.
  • Zoom lenses are the lenses most photographers use. They provide a range of focal lengths in one lens and therefore offer more versatility and reduce the need for a photographer having to carry as many lenses.
    Mode 1 - is the standard IS mode on an Image Stabilizer lens. It is used for general shooting.
  • Prime lenses are single focal length lenses. They usually have higher image quality, and are smaller, lower cost and lighter than zoom lenses. They are also easier to manufacture. There is also usually less design compromise with a single focal length lens, hence the higher image quality.
  • Kit lenses are the basic lenses supplied with the consumer cameras such as the EOS 450D. They are lightweight and offer good image quality in a small, cheap package aimed at the beginner or low-end consumer user.
  • Mid-range lenses are those which are in between the kit lenses and L lens standards. They feature higher build quality and better optics than the kit lenses, and they are also usually heavier and more expensive. They are aimed at the mid-range consumers. This is the largest group of lenses within the Canon lens range covering a wide range of focal lengths.
  • L series lenses are the highest quality lenses in the range. They are aimed at professionals and enthusiast photographers looking to get the highest image quality. They feature the best image quality and generally have the fastest maximum apertures. They are signified by a red band on the lens barrel and in focal lengths over 200mm the lenses are also usually white to reflect heat.
    Since these are the Luxury lenses, they generally cost more than those in other lens ranges.
  • Before autofocus, we used split screen viewfinders to judge focus. These showed the image split into two halves. By changing the focus on the lens the two halves were bought into alignment and then the image was in focus. An AF system effectively does the same thing, but it measures how far out of alignment the two halves of the image are and then makes adjustments to bring it into focus automatically. It can do this at any of the focus points within the viewfinder allowing the user to focus using whichever focus point is closest to the subject.
  • Before autofocus, we used split screen viewfinders to judge focus. These showed the image split into two halves. By changing the focus on the lens the two halves were bought into alignment and then the image was in focus. An AF system effectively does the same thing, but it measures how far out of alignment the two halves of the image are and then makes adjustments to bring it into focus automatically. It can do this at any of the focus points within the viewfinder allowing the user to focus using whichever focus point is closest to the subject.
  • Consumer EOS Models feature 3 Autofocus modes.
    Professional EOS models feature 2 Autofocus modes.
    All cameras can also be focused manually where you adjust the focus distance using the focus ring on the lens
  • One Shot AF is used for subjects that are stationary. Once autofocus is activated and locked in One Shot mode, it will not re-focus until the shutter button is released and autofocus reactivated.
  • AI Servo is used for moving subjects. The camera will track the subject and calculate the speed of travel so that at the point you take the picture, it will be focused at the correct point, despite the momentary black-out that happens between pressing the shutter button and the image actually being taken.
    This mode is mainly used by sports and wildlife photographers.
  • AI Focus is a combination of One shot and AI Servo. When the subject is static, it will act in One shot mode. Once the subject is moving the camera will switch over to AI Servo to track the subject.
    It is only found on the consumer models as professionals will generally shoot in either One Shot or AI Servo, and will know when to switch between them as they see fit.
  • Everyone’s eyesight is different, so the cameras feature a dioptre correction so that the camera can be tailored to the user’s eyes. The dioptre dial is located next to the viewfinder and offers a range of +3 to -1 adjustment. For extra adjustment, accessory lenses are available.
    To adjust the dioptre, remove the lens and look through the viewfinder, then rotate the dioptre wheel until the camera information is in the viewfinder and the focus points are in sharp focus. DEMO this with a real camera.
  • EOS models offer three basic drive modes. The drive mode determines whether the camera takes one shot at a time, a series of shots continuously or a shot after a fixed period of time.
    Self-timer continuous is only found on the EOS 450D.
  • Single shot is for when you only want to take a single image at a time. It is perfect for use with static subjects when you only want one photograph.
  • Continuous shooting mode allows you to keep taking pictures by simply keeping the shutter button pressed. The maximum frame rate will depend on the EOS model. This mode is used for capturing action, and is most widely used by sports and wildlife photographers.
    The quoted frame rate is the maximum attainable, it is not a guaranteed rate as it depends on shutter speed and the charge available in the battery.
  • Self-time mode delays the firing of the shutter for a fixed period of time after the shutter button has been pressed.
    It is very useful for static macro subjects without using a remote release cable, where pressing the shutter button could create camera shake.
  • Timer continuous is new on the EOS 450D. It acts as a self timer so delays the shutter release after the button is pressed, but allows the user to program in a number of images to be captured in a sequence.
    The images show a self portrait shot using the Timer Continuous setting. In the first image the subject was not quite in place, in the second the expression is not quite right, but in the third everything came together to produce the best of the series.
  • The camera’s buffer determines the number of images that can be captured in a continuous sequence. It is quoted as the number of large JPEG files that can be captured before the camera has to stop to write data to the memory card. Models higher in the EOS range have a larger and faster buffer memory capacity.
  • The camera’s buffer determines the number of images that can be captured in a continuous sequence. It is quoted as the number of large JPEG files that can be captured before the camera has to stop to write data to the memory card. Models higher in the EOS range have a larger and faster buffer memory capacity.
  • Shooting modes determine what settings you can make to the shutter speed, aperture and ISO when taking an image. There are two sets of shooting modes, the BASIC modes and the Creative modes. In Level 1 we will only look at the BASIC modes and what they set.
    Creative modes give more control to the user, whereas BASIC modes control almost all the settings for you.
  • For general shooting. Green square sets all the required settings. This makes the camera like a point-and-shoot compact model.
    In each of the Basic modes, the camera will always set the ISO, white balance, focusing, exposure and flash.
    Green square mode specifically sets: AI Focus, Auto Flash, Auto ISO, and Shutter speed fast enough to ensure hand-holding based on the focal length of the lens.
  • Designed for shooting portraits of people. Tries to provide good background blur to help the subject stand out. Amount of blur will depend on the lens being used.
    In each of the Basic modes, the camera will always set the ISO, white balance, focusing, exposure and flash.
  • The Landscape Mode is designed for taking photographs of landscapes with wide angle lenses. If a wide angle lens is used then the camera will select an aperture capable of giving a good depth-of-field.
    If a telephoto lens is used then the requirement of a shutter speed fast enough to hand hold the camera may override other characteristics that are set within this mode.
    In each of the Basic modes, the camera will always set the ISO, white balance, focusing, exposure and flash.
  • The Close-up Basic mode is designed to avoid camera shake and then to give a good depth-of-field if possible.
    The best magnifications are obtained with zoom lenses when set to the maximum tele-setting on the lens. But this also increases the shutter speed needed to hand hold the lens and makes it difficult to get the depth-of-field desirable for close up photography. It should be noted that this mode is designed for close up and not true macro photography (magnifications greater than 1:1). In each of the Basic modes, the camera will always set the ISO, white balance, focusing, exposure and flash.
  • Sport Basic mode sets the highest shutter speed available to freeze the subject. The focusing is set to AI Servo mode to ensure that the camera can track and follow the subject as it moves.
    In each of the Basic modes, the camera will always set the ISO, white balance, focusing, exposure and flash.
  • Use of an external flash is recommend in this mode, but not essential. This mode allows the flash to fire to illuminate near subjects, then uses a long shutter speed to capture the ambient light. A tripod is also advised when using this mode as shutter speeds can be long.
    In each of the Basic modes, the camera will always set the ISO, white balance, focusing, exposure and flash.
  • Used for taking pictures of floodlit buildings at night. Flash cannot be used as it is not powerful enough to light up an entire building.
    A tripod is recommended in this mode.
    In each of the Basic modes, the camera will always set the ISO, white balance, focusing, exposure and flash.
  • The table shows what is set in each of the Basic modes.
  • Creative modes are for photographers who want to be involved in the photograph taking process. They require more thought and input from the photographer and can give better results if used properly.
    5 modes on consumer cameras. Professional models do not have the A-DEP mode.
    These modes will be looked at in depth in level 2.
  • Transcript

    • 1. 1 Canon Training Network.
    • 2. Level 1 – Camera Use Basics 2 Canon Training Network.
    • 3. Camera Use Basics Contents Lenses Autofocus Drive Modes Shooting Modes 3 Canon Training Network.
    • 4. Camera Use Basics Lenses 4 Canon Training Network.
    • 5. Lenses Camera Use Basics • • Fisheye ‘sees’ 180 degrees • 5 Lens focal length is really about field-of-view, called FOV 500mm ‘sees’ 5 degrees Canon Training Network.
    • 6. Camera Use Basics Lenses 15mm 300mm 100mm 85mm 50mm 28mm 24mm 20mm 14mm 200mm 400mm 35mm 600mm 135mm fisheye 6 Canon Training Network.
    • 7. Understanding Camera Use Basics lens names • The name of a lens tells you all the important information about it EF 100-400mm The focal length and lens type (zoom or prime) f/4.5-5.6 The maximum aperture L An L series lens (not present on Non-L series lenses) IS Features Image Stabilizer USM 7 The lens type (EF, EF-S, MP-E, TS-E) Features an ultrasonic motor for silent and fast auto focusing Canon Training Network.
    • 8. Camera Use Basics Lenses • Wide-angle lenses – 10mm to 35mm • • 8 Capture a wide view Used for landscapes Canon Training Network.
    • 9. Camera Use Basics Lenses • Standard lenses – 35mm to 50mm • • 9 FOV similar to human eye Natural perspective Canon Training Network.
    • 10. Camera Use Basics Lenses • Telephoto lenses – 85mm to 300mm • Used for subjects further away • 10 Compress perspective Canon Training Network.
    • 11. Camera Use Basics Lenses • Super- telephoto lenses – 400mm to 800mm • • 11 Used for subjects you can not get close to Sports and wildlife Canon Training Network.
    • 12. Camera Use Basics Lenses Zoom lenses • Provide a range of focal lengths in one • E.g. EF24-105mm f4L IS USM • More versatile than single focal length • Can be Wide-angle, Standard or Telephoto lenses • Smaller maximum aperture than prime lenses • Usually heavier and larger than prime lenses Use Stabilizer Mode 1 for everyday use • 12 Canon Training Network.
    • 13. Camera Use Basics Lenses Prime lenses • • Usually high quality • Usually faster maximum aperture • E.g. EF 50mm f/1.4 USM • 13 Single focal length Can be Wide-angle, Standard or Telephoto type Canon Training Network.
    • 14. EF or EF-S Camera Use Basics • Canon has two types of lenses – EF fits all cameras – EF-S fits APS-C cameras • EF and EF-S lenses mount differently • Cameras that can use both feature two alignment marks – Red dot – EF lenses – White square – EF-S lenses 14 Canon Training Network.
    • 15. Camera Use Basics • EF or EF-S Two lens types in the Canon system – EF – approx. 50 current lenses – EF-S – approx. 10 current lenses • • EF lenses for cameras such as EOS-1D Mark III and EOS-1Ds Mark III but can also be used on all other models • 15 EF-S for cameras such as EOS 450D and EOS 40D EF-S lenses have a short back-focus design making wide-angle lenses possible with APS-C sensors Canon Training Network.
    • 16. Camera Use Basics Lens ranges Kit lenses • • E.g. EF-S 18-55mm f/3.5-5.6 IS and EF-S 55-250 f/4-5.6 IS • 16 Basic lens range aimed at beginners Low-cost and good image quality Canon Training Network.
    • 17. Camera Use Basics Lens ranges Mid-range lenses • • Higher image quality • Better build quality • 17 Largest section of the Canon lens range covering a wide range of focal lengths Aimed at mid-range consumer users Canon Training Network.
    • 18. Camera Use Basics Lens ranges L lenses • • Highest image quality • Most durable • For professionals and enthusiasts • 18 The ‘Luxury’ lenses Red band on lens Canon Training Network.
    • 19. Camera Use Basics Autofocus 19 Canon Training Network.
    • 20. Camera Use Basics Autofocus 1.2 auto focus.swf 21 Canon Training Network.
    • 21. Focus modes Camera Use Basics • AF mode – – – – One-Shot AF ONE SHOT AI FOCUS Four focus modes on consumer models AI SERVO • One Shot AI Focus AI Servo Manual focus Three focus modes on professional models – One Shot – AI Servo – Manual focus 22 Canon Training Network.
    • 22. Camera Use Basics One Shot AF • Most commonly used autofocus mode • Used for static subjects – Portraits – Landscapes 23 Canon Training Network.
    • 23. Camera Use Basics • AI Servo AF Used for moving subjects – Sports – Wildlife • 24 Predictive tracking focus keeps following the subject until the picture is taken Canon Training Network.
    • 24. Camera Use Basics AI Focus AF • • One shot normally • 25 A combination of One Shot and AI Servo AI Servo when subject movement detected Canon Training Network.
    • 25. Camera Use Basics Dioptre dial Dioptre correction Everyone has different eyesight – all models offer viewfinder dioptre adjustment • Use the dial next to the viewfinder • +3 to -1 dioptre range • Remove lens, look through the viewfinder and rotate the dial until the viewfinder info and focus points are sharp • 26 • Accessory lenses are available for further correction Canon Training Network.
    • 26. Camera Use Basics Drive Modes 27 Canon Training Network.
    • 27. Camera Use Basics Drive modes • EOS cameras offer a selection of drive mode choices • Drive modes control how the camera takes a picture • EOS Cameras typically offer three choices Single Shot Continuous Self Timer 28 Canon Training Network.
    • 28. Camera Use Basics Single shot • • Takes only one image when shutter button pressed • 29 Used for static subjects Release shutter button back to half pressure and re-press to take another image Canon Training Network.
    • 29. Camera Use Basics Continuous shooting • Used to capture action • Continues taking images while the shutter button is pressed • The maximum frame rate varies depending on the model – – 30 EOS 450D = 3.5fps EOS-1D Mark III = 10fps Canon Training Network.
    • 30. Camera Use Basics Self-timer • • Delays the release of the shutter after pressing the shutter button • 31 Used for static subjects and selfportraits 2 or 10 second delay Canon Training Network.
    • 31. Camera Use Basics • • A limited range of cameras have this mode Self timer operation with the option to set a continuous number of frames to be captured – very useful for self-portraits Not quite in place 32 Timer continuous Expression not right Just perfect! Canon Training Network.
    • 32. Camera Use Basics Buffer • The buffer is an internal memory that determines how many images can be taken in a burst • Images are written into the buffer and out to the card simultaneously rather than waiting for the buffer to fill before writing to the memory card • Once the buffer is full, shooting can only take place when there is space for at least one image in the buffer • Usually quoted as the number of Large JPEG files that can be captured in a sequence 1.2 buffer.swf 34 Canon Training Network.
    • 33. Camera Use Basics Shooting Modes 35 Canon Training Network.
    • 34. Shooting modes Camera Use Basics BASIC modes • Shooting modes determine the settings used to capture an image • Mode dial has two sections – BASIC modes • • • • • • • Full Auto Portrait Landscape Close-up Sports Night Portrait Flash off – Creative modes Creative modes 36 • • • • • P Av Tv M A-DEP Canon Training Network.
    • 35. Camera Use Basics Green square • Designed with general photography in mind • Aperture and shutter values set automatically to prevent camera shake • Camera sets: – AI Focus – Auto Flash – Auto ISO • 37 Shutter speed appropriate to focal length Canon Training Network.
    • 36. Camera Use Basics Portrait mode • • Provides a sharp subject against a blurred background Degree of blur depends on lens – Tele • good blurring – Standard • some blurring – Wide • little or no blurring • Camera sets: – One Shot focus – Continuous shooting drive mode – Auto flash 38 Canon Training Network.
    • 37. Landscape mode Camera Use Basics • Designed to give a good depth-of-field • Aperture permitted will be controlled by lens fitted and available light • Camera sets – One Shot focus – Single shot drive mode – Flash Off 39 Canon Training Network.
    • 38. Camera Use Basics Close-up mode • Designed to avoid camera shake and give good depth-of-field if possible • Maximum magnification (1:3 to 1:5) on all zoom lenses is at highest focal length – Designed for subjects 10-15cm diameter close up not macro • Camera sets – One Shot focus – Single shot drive mode – Auto flash 40 Canon Training Network.
    • 39. Camera Use Basics Sport mode • Sets highest shutter speed available • AI Servo focusing set • For a better effect pan during exposure • Camera sets: – AI Servo focus – Continuous shooting drive mode – Flash off 41 Canon Training Network.
    • 40. Night portrait Camera Use Basics mode • Designed to combine long exposures with flash • A tripod is essential as shutter speeds will be too slow to hand-hold and an external flash is recommended as the built in flash may not be powerful enough for many subjects • Camera sets – One Shot focus – Single shot drive mode – Auto flash 42 Canon Training Network.
    • 41. Flash off mode Camera Use Basics • Allows night and lowlight photographs to be taken without the flash firing when not required • For all lowlight work a tripod is essential • Camera sets: – AI Focus – Single shot drive mode – Flash off 43 Canon Training Network.
    • 42. Camera Use Basics Basic mode comparison Name Drive Setting Flash Full Auto AI Focus Single Shot Auto Portrait One Shot Continuous Shooting Auto Landscape One Shot Single Shot Off Close-up One Shot Single Shot Auto Sport AI Servo Continuous Shooting Off Night Portrait One Shot Single Shot Auto Flash Off 44 Auto Focus AI Focus Single Shot Auto Canon Training Network.
    • 43. Camera Use Basics Creative modes • • 45 Additional menus for further settings are displayed • Creative modes Creative modes give the user more creativity and ability to change more settings but require more input from the photographer and a greater understanding of photography 5 creative modes (to be covered in Level 2) – – – – – Program (P) Aperture Priority (AV) Shutter Priority (TV) Manual (M) Auto Depth (A-DEP) – on consumer models only Canon Training Network.
    • 44. Camera Use Basics What have we covered? Lenses Autofocus Drive Modes Shooting Modes 46 Canon Training Network.

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